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Author Gaston, K.J.; Holt, L.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nature, extent and ecological implications of night‐time light from road vehicles Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 55 Issue 5 Pages (down) 2296-2307  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology; Lighting; Review  
  Abstract The erosion of night‐time by the introduction of artificial lighting constitutes a profound pressure on the natural environment. It has altered what had for millennia been reliable signals from natural light cycles used for regulating a host of biological processes, with impacts ranging from changes in gene expression to ecosystem processes.

Studies of these impacts have focused almost exclusively on those resulting from stationary sources of light emissions, and particularly streetlights. However, mobile sources, especially road vehicle headlights, contribute substantial additional emissions.

The ecological impacts of light emissions from vehicle headlights are likely to be especially high because these are (1) focused so as to light roadsides at higher intensities than commonly experienced from other sources, and well above activation thresholds for many biological processes; (2) projected largely in a horizontal plane and thus can carry over long distances; (3) introduced into much larger areas of the landscape than experience street lighting; (4) typically broad “white” spectrum, which substantially overlaps the action spectra of many biological processes and (5) often experienced at roadsides as series of pulses of light (produced by passage of vehicles), a dynamic known to have major biological impacts.

The ecological impacts of road vehicle headlights will markedly increase with projected global growth in numbers of vehicles and the road network, increasing the local severity of emissions (because vehicle numbers are increasing faster than growth in the road network) and introducing emissions into areas from which they were previously absent. The effects will be further exacerbated by technological developments that are increasing the intensity of headlight emissions and the amounts of blue light in emission spectra.

Synthesis and applications. Emissions from vehicle headlights need to be considered as a major, and growing, source of ecological impacts of artificial night‐time lighting. It will be a significant challenge to minimise these impacts whilst balancing drivers' needs at night and avoiding risk and discomfort for other road users. Nonetheless, there is potential to identify solutions to these conflicts, both through the design of headlights and that of roads.
 
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  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1841  
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Author Rahman, S.A.; St Hilaire, M.A.; Gronfier, C.; Chang, A.-M.; Santhi, N.; Czeisler, C.A.; Klerman, E.B.; Lockley, S.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Functional decoupling of melatonin suppression and circadian phase resetting in humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Physiol  
  Volume 596 Issue 11 Pages (down) 2147-2157  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract KEY POINTS: There is assumed to be a monotonic association between melatonin suppression and circadian phase resetting induced by light exposure. We tested the association between melatonin suppression and phase resetting in humans. Sixteen young healthy participants received nocturnal bright light ( approximately 9500 lux) exposure of continuous or intermittent patterns, and different durations ranging from 12 min to 6.5 h. Intermittent exposure patterns showed significant phase shifts with disproportionately less melatonin suppression. Each and every bright light stimulus in an intermittent exposure pattern induced a similar degree of melatonin suppression, but did not appear to cause an equal magnitude of phase shift. These results suggest that phase shifts and melatonin suppression are functionally independent such that one cannot be used as a proxy measure of the other. ABSTRACT: Continuous experimental light exposures show that, in general, the conditions that produce greater melatonin suppression also produce greater phase shift, leading to the assumption that one can be used as a proxy for the other. We tested this association in 16 healthy individuals who participated in a 9-day inpatient protocol by assessing melatonin suppression and phase resetting in response to a nocturnal light exposure (LE) of different patterns: (i) dim-light control (<3 lux; n = 6) or (ii) two 12-min intermittent bright light pulses (IBL) separated by 36 min of darkness ( approximately 9500 lux; n = 10). We compared these results with historical data from additional LE patterns: (i) dim-light control (<3 lux; n = 11); (ii) single continuous bright light exposure of 12 min (n = 9), 1.0 h (n = 10) or 6.5 h (n = 6); or (iii) an IBL light pattern consisting of six 15-min pulses with 1.0 h dim-light recovery intervals between them during a total of 6.5 h (n = 7). All light exposure groups had significantly greater phase-delay shifts than the dim-light control condition (P < 0.0001). While a monotonic association between melatonin suppression and circadian phase shift was observed, intermittent exposure patterns showed significant phase shifts with disproportionately less melatonin suppression. Each and every IBL stimulus induced a similar degree of melatonin suppression, but did not appear to cause an equal magnitude of phase shift. These results suggest unique specificities in how light-induced phase shifts and melatonin suppression are mediated such that one cannot be used as a proxy measure of the other.  
  Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-3751 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29707782 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1887  
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Author Zhao, Z., Zhou, Y., Tan, G., & Li, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Research progress about the effect and prevention of blue light on eyes Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Ophthalmology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 11 Issue 12 Pages (down) 1999-2003  
  Keywords Vision; Human Health; Review  
  Abstract In recent years, people have become increasingly attentive to light pollution influences on their eyes. In the visible spectrum, short-wave blue light with wavelength between 415 nm and 455 nm is closely related to eye light damage. This high energy blue light passes through the cornea and lens to the retina causing diseases such as dry eye, cataract, age-related macular degeneration, even stimulating the brain, inhibiting melatonin secretion, and enhancing adrenocortical hormone production, which will destroy the hormonal balance and directly affect sleep quality. Therefore, the effect of Blu-rays on ocular is becoming an important concern for the future. We describe blue light's effects on eye tissues, summarize the research on eye injury and its physical prevention and medical treatment.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2313  
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Author Coesfeld, J.; Anderson, S.; Baugh, K.; Elvidge, C.; Schernthanner, H.; Kyba, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Variation of Individual Location Radiance in VIIRS DNB Monthly Composite Images Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 10 Issue 12 Pages (down) 1964  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation  
  Abstract With the growing size and use of night light time series from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Day/Night Band (DNB), it is important to understand the stability of the dataset. All satellites observe differences in pixel values during repeat observations. In the case of night light data, these changes can be due to both environmental effects and changes in light emission. Here we examine the stability of individual locations of particular large scale light sources (e.g., airports and prisons) in the monthly composites of DNB data from April 2012 to September 2017. The radiances for individual pixels of most large light emitters are approximately normally distributed, with a standard deviation of typically 15–20% of the mean. Greenhouses and flares, however, are not stable sources. We observe geospatial autocorrelation in the monthly variations for nearby sites, while the correlation for sites separated by large distances is small. This suggests that local factors contribute most to the variation in the pixel radiances and furthermore that averaging radiances over large areas will reduce the total variation. A better understanding of the causes of temporal variation would improve the sensitivity of DNB to lighting changes.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2129  
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Author Su, Y.; Yue, J.; Liu, X.; Miller, S.D.; Ш, W.C.S.; Smith, S.M.; Guo, D.; Guo, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mesospheric Bore Observations Using Suomi-NPP VIIRS DNB during 2013–2017 Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 10 Issue 12 Pages (down) 1935  
  Keywords Airglow; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract This paper reports mesospheric bore events observed by Day/Night Band (DNB) of the Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NOAA/NASA) Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) environmental satellite over five years (2013–2017). Two types of special mesospheric bore events were observed, enabled by the wide field of view of VIIRS: extremely wide bores (>2000 km extension perpendicular to the bore propagation direction), and those exhibiting more than 15 trailing crests and troughs. A mesospheric bore event observed simultaneously from space and ground was investigated in detail. DNB enables the preliminary global observation of mesospheric bores for the first time. DNB mesospheric bores occurred more frequently in March, April and May. Their typical lengths are between 300 km and 1200 km. The occurrence rate of bores at low latitudes is higher than that at middle latitudes. Among the 61 bore events, 39 events occurred in the tropical region (20°S–20°N). The high occurrence rate of mesospheric bores during the spring months in the tropical region coincides with the reported seasonal and latitudinal variations of mesospheric inversion layers.  
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  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2128  
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