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Author Mason, I.C.; Boubekri, M.; Figueiro, M.G.; Hasler, B.P.; Hattar, S.; Hill, S.M.; Nelson, R.J.; Sharkey, K.M.; Wright, K.P.; Boyd, W.A.; Brown, M.K.; Laposky, A.D.; Twery, M.J.; Zee, P.C.
Title Circadian Health and Light: A Report on the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Workshop Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume 33 Issue 5 Pages (down) 451-457
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Despite the omnipresence of artificial and natural light exposure, there exists little guidance in the United States and elsewhere on light exposure in terms of timing, intensity, spectrum, and other light characteristics known to affect human health, performance, and well-being; in parallel, there is little information regarding the quantity and characteristics of light exposure that people receive. To address this, the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research, in the Division of Lung Diseases, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, held a workshop in August 2016 on circadian health and light. Workshop participants discussed scientific research advances on the effects of light on human physiology, identified remaining knowledge gaps in these research areas, and articulated opportunities to use appropriate lighting to protect and improve circadian-dependent health. Based on this workshop, participants put forth the following strategic intent, objectives, and strategies to guide discovery, measurement, education, and implementation of the appropriate use of light to achieve, promote, and maintain circadian health in modern society.
Address Center for Circadian and Sleep Medicine, Department of Neurology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30033850 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1975
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Author Raap, T.; Pinxten, R.; Eens, M.
Title Cavities shield birds from effects of artificial light at night on sleep Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages (down) 449-456
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light pollution is an ever increasing worldwide problem disrupting animal behavior. Artificial light at night (ALAN) has been shown to affect sleep in wild birds. Even cavity-nesting bird species may be affected when sleeping inside their cavity. Correlational studies suggest that light from outside the cavity/nest box, for example from street lights, may affect sleep. We used an experimental design to study to what extent nest boxes shield animals from effects of ALAN on sleep. We recorded individual sleep behavior of free-living great tits (Parus major) that were roosting in dark nest boxes and exposed their nest box entrance to ALAN the following night (1.6 lux white LED light; a similar light intensity as was found at nest boxes near street lights). Their behavior was compared to that of control birds sleeping in dark nest boxes on both nights. Our experimental treatment did not affect sleep behavior. Sleep behavior of birds in the control group did not differ from that of individuals in the light treated group. Our results suggest that during winter cavities shield birds from some effects of ALAN. Furthermore, given that effects of ALAN and exposure to artificial light are species-, sex-, and season-dependent, it is important that studies using wild animals quantify individual exposure to light pollution, and be cautious in the interpretation and generalization of the effects, or lack thereof, from light pollution. Rigorous studies are necessary to examine individual light exposure and its consequences in cavity- and open-nesting birds.
Address Department of Biology, Behavioural Ecology and Ecophysiology Group, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29781104 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1912
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Author de Jong, M.; Lamers, K.P.; Eugster, M.; Ouyang, J.Q.; Da Silva, A.; Mateman, A.C.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K.
Title Effects of experimental light at night on extra-pair paternity in a songbird Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages (down) 441-448
Keywords animals
Abstract Light pollution is increasing worldwide and significantly affects animal behavior. In birds, these effects include advancement of morning activity and onset of dawn song, which may affect extra-pair paternity. Advanced dawn song of males may stimulate females to engage in extra-pair copulations, and the earlier activity onset may affect the males' mate guarding behavior. Earlier work showed an effect of light at night on extra-pair behavior, but this was in an area with other anthropogenic disturbances. Here, we present a two-year experimental study on effects of light at night on extra-pair paternity of great tits (Parus major). Previously dark natural areas were illuminated with white, red, and green LED lamps and compared to a dark control. In 2014, the proportion of extra-pair young in broods increased with distance to the red and white lamps (i.e., at lower light intensities), but decreased with distance to the poles in the dark control. In 2013, we found no effects on the proportion of extra-pair young. The total number of offspring sired by a male was unaffected by artificial light at night in both years, suggesting that potential changes in female fidelity in pairs breeding close to white and red light did not translate into fitness benefits for the males of these pairs. Artificial light at night might disrupt the natural patterns of extra-pair paternity, possibly negates potential benefits of extra-pair copulations and thus could alter sexual selection processes in wild birds.
Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29952126 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1953
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Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Kurumatani, N.
Title Obayashi et al. Respond to “Light at Night Predicts Depression—What Next?” Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 187 Issue 3 Pages (down) 439-440
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract Our research includes some strengths and limitations. The most important strength is objective measurement of light at night (LAN) intensity using a bedside light meter. Most previous studies evaluating the association between LAN and health outcomes have assessed indoor LAN levels using a self-reported questionnaire or outdoor LAN levels using satellite data; however, self-reported indoor LAN levels has not yet been validated with objective measurement and outdoor LAN levels are surrogates for an individual LAN exposure. The second strength of our study includes its longitudinal design using multivariable methods to adjust for confounders, which indicated LAN exposure may be a cause of the incidence of depressive symptoms. Indeed, the depressive score evaluated by questionnaires may be above or below the cut-off value over the short term; therefore, a long-term study considering such unstable outcomes should be conducted. In the current study, LAN exposure was measured for only two nights; thus, an amplitude of LAN intensity has been focused. However, multiple measurements over time in the future study would allow an analysis of fluctuations in LAN exposure, which might be important for circadian physiology.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1717
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Author Hasler, B.P.
Title Commentary on Bedroom Light Exposure at Night and the Incidence of Depressive Symptoms: A Longitudinal Study of the HEIJOKYO Cohort (Obayashi et al) Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 187 Issue 3 Pages (down) 435-438
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract In modern society, we are increasingly disconnected from natural light/dark cycles and beset by round-the-clock exposure to artificial light. Light has powerful effects on physical and mental health, in part via the circadian system, and thus the timing of light exposure dictates whether it is helpful or harmful. In their compelling paper, Obayashi and colleagues offer evidence that light at night can prospectively predict an elevated incidence of depressive symptoms in older adults. Strengths of the study include the longitudinal design and direct, objective assessment of light levels, as well as accounting for multiple plausible confounders during analyses. Follow-up studies should address the study's limitations, including reliance on a global self-report of sleep quality and a two-night assessment of light exposure that may not reliably represent typical light exposure. In addition, experimental studies including physiological circadian measures will be necessary to determine if the light effects on depression are mediated through the circadian system or are so-called “direct” effects of light. In any case, these exciting findings could inform novel new approaches to preventing depressive disorders in older adults.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1716
Permanent link to this record