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Author Hasler, B.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Commentary on Bedroom Light Exposure at Night and the Incidence of Depressive Symptoms: A Longitudinal Study of the HEIJOKYO Cohort (Obayashi et al) Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 187 Issue 3 Pages (down) 435-438  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health  
  Abstract In modern society, we are increasingly disconnected from natural light/dark cycles and beset by round-the-clock exposure to artificial light. Light has powerful effects on physical and mental health, in part via the circadian system, and thus the timing of light exposure dictates whether it is helpful or harmful. In their compelling paper, Obayashi and colleagues offer evidence that light at night can prospectively predict an elevated incidence of depressive symptoms in older adults. Strengths of the study include the longitudinal design and direct, objective assessment of light levels, as well as accounting for multiple plausible confounders during analyses. Follow-up studies should address the study's limitations, including reliance on a global self-report of sleep quality and a two-night assessment of light exposure that may not reliably represent typical light exposure. In addition, experimental studies including physiological circadian measures will be necessary to determine if the light effects on depression are mediated through the circadian system or are so-called “direct” effects of light. In any case, these exciting findings could inform novel new approaches to preventing depressive disorders in older adults.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1716  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Donners, M.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Groenendijk, D.; van Langevelde, F.; Bikker, J.W.; Longcore, T.; Veenendaal, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Colors of attraction: Modeling insect flight to light behavior Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol  
  Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages (down) 434-440  
  Keywords Animals; ecology; Lighting  
  Abstract Light sources attract nocturnal flying insects, but some lamps attract more insects than others. The relation between the properties of a light source and the number of attracted insects is, however, poorly understood. We developed a model to quantify the attractiveness of light sources based on the spectral output. This model is fitted using data from field experiments that compare a large number of different light sources. We validated this model using two additional datasets, one for all insects and one excluding the numerous Diptera. Our model facilitates the development and application of light sources that attract fewer insects without the need for extensive field tests and it can be used to correct for spectral composition when formulating hypotheses on the ecological impact of artificial light. In addition, we present a tool allowing the conversion of the spectral output of light sources to their relative insect attraction based on this model.  
  Address Plant Ecology and Nature Conservation, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29944198 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1944  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Jahnichen, D.; Grubisic, M.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Slugs (Arionidae) benefit from nocturnal artificial illumination Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol  
  Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages (down) 429-433  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial illumination increases around the globe and this has been found to affect many groups of organisms and ecosystems. By manipulating nocturnal illumination using one large experimental field site with 24 streetlights and one dark control, we assessed the impact of artificial illumination on slugs over a period of 4 years. The number of slugs, primarily Arionidae, increased strongly in the illuminated site but not on the dark site. There are several nonexclusive explanations for this effect, including reduced predation and increased food quality in the form of carcasses of insects attracted by the light. As slugs play an important role in ecosystems and are also important pest species, the increase of slugs under artificial illumination cannot only affect ecosystem functioning but also have important economic consequences.  
  Address Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB), Berlin, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29761669 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1913  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Kurumatani, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bedroom Light Exposure at Night and the Incidence of Depressive Symptoms: A Longitudinal Study of the HEIJO-KYO Cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol  
  Volume 187 Issue 3 Pages (down) 427-434  
  Keywords Human Health; Mental Health; indoor light; geriatrics; Sleep; Sleep Disorders  
  Abstract Previous studies have indicated that minimal exposure to light at night (LAN) increases depression risk, even at 5 lux, in nocturnal and diurnal mammals. Although such low-level LAN may affect human circadian physiology, the association between exposure to LAN and depressive symptoms remains uncertain. In the present study, bedroom light intensity was measured objectively, and depressive symptoms were assessed, during 2010-2014 in Nara, Japan. Of 863 participants (mean age = 71.5 years) who did not have depressive symptoms at baseline, 73 participants reported development of depressive symptoms during follow-up (median, 24 months). Compared with the “dark” group (average of <5 lux; n = 710), the LAN group (average of >/=5 lux; n = 153) exhibited a significantly higher depression risk (hazard ratio = 1.89; 95% CI: 1.13, 3.14), according to a Cox proportional hazards model adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and economic status. Further, the significance remained in a multivariable model adjusting for hypertension, diabetes, and sleep parameters (hazard ratio = 1.72; 95% CI: 1.03, 2.89). Sensitivity analyses using bedroom light data with a cutoff value of >/=10 lux suggested consistent results. In conclusion, these results indicated that exposure to LAN in home settings was independently associated with subsequent depression risk in an elderly general population.  
  Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, 840 Shijocho, Kashiharashi, Nara 634-8521, Japan; e-mail: obayashi(at)naramed-u.ac.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28992236 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1815  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Souman, J.L.; Borra, T.; de Goijer, I.; Schlangen, L.J.M.; Vlaskamp, B.N.S.; Lucassen, M.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spectral Tuning of White Light Allows for Strong Reduction in Melatonin Suppression without Changing Illumination Level or Color Temperature Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages (down) 420-431  
  Keywords Human Health; Lighting  
  Abstract Studies with monochromatic light stimuli have shown that the action spectrum for melatonin suppression exhibits its highest sensitivity at short wavelengths, around 460 to 480 nm. Other studies have demonstrated that filtering out the short wavelengths from white light reduces melatonin suppression. However, this filtering of short wavelengths was generally confounded with reduced light intensity and/or changes in color temperature. Moreover, it changed the appearance from white light to yellow/orange, rendering it unusable for many practical applications. Here, we show that selectively tuning a polychromatic white light spectrum, compensating for the reduction in spectral power between 450 and 500 nm by enhancing power at even shorter wavelengths, can produce greatly different effects on melatonin production, without changes in illuminance or color temperature. On different evenings, 15 participants were exposed to 3 h of white light with either low or high power between 450 and 500 nm, and the effects on salivary melatonin levels and alertness were compared with those during a dim light baseline. Exposure to the spectrum with low power between 450 and 500 nm, but high power at even shorter wavelengths, did not suppress melatonin compared with dim light, despite a large difference in illuminance (175 vs. <5 lux). In contrast, exposure to the spectrum with high power between 450 and 500 nm (also 175 lux) resulted in almost 50% melatonin suppression. For alertness, no significant differences between the 3 conditions were observed. These results open up new opportunities for lighting applications that allow for the use of electrical lighting without disturbance of melatonin production.  
  Address Philips Lighting Research, Department Lighting Applications, Eindhoven, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29984614 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1985  
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