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Author Bian, Z.; Cheng, R.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Lu, C.
Title Effect of green light on nitrate reduction and edible quality of hydroponically grown lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L.) under short-term continuous light from red and blue light-emitting diodes Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Environmental and Experimental Botany Abbreviated Journal Environmental and Experimental Botany
Volume 153 Issue Pages 63-71
Keywords Plants
Abstract Most leafy vegetables can accumulate large amounts of nitrate, which are often associated with harmful effects on human health. Nitrate assimilation in plants is determined by various growth conditions, especially light conditions including light intensity, light duration and light spectral composition. Red and blue light are the most important since both drive photosynthesis. Increasingly, recent evidence demonstrates a role for green light in the regulation of plant growth and development by regulating the expression of some specific genes. However, the effect of green light on nitrate assimilation has been underestimated. In this study, lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Butterhead) was treated with continuous light (CL) for 48 h by combined red and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) supplemented with or without green LED in an environment-controlled growth chamber. The results showed that nitrate reductase (NR) and nitrite reductase (NiR) related-gene expression and nitrate assimilation enzyme activities were affected by light spectral composition and light duration of CL. Adding green light to red and blue light promoted NR and NiR expressions at 24 h, subsequently, it reduced expression of these genes during CL. Compared with red and blue LEDs, green light supplementation significantly increased NR, NiR, glutamate synthase (GOGAT) and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities. Green-light supplementation under red and blue light was more efficient in promoting nutritional values by maintaining high net photosynthetic rates (Pn) and maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm).
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ISSN (up) 0098-8472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1915
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Author Kong, Y.; Stasiak, M.; Dixon, M.A.; Zheng, Y.
Title Blue light associated with low phytochrome activity can promote elongation growth as shade-avoidance response: A comparison with red light in four bedding plant species Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Environmental and Experimental Botany Abbreviated Journal Environmental and Experimental Botany
Volume 155 Issue Pages 345-359
Keywords Plants
Abstract o explore the action mode of blue light on elongation growth of bedding plants, the plant growth and morphology traits of petunia (Petunia × hybrida, ‘Duvet Red’), calibrachoa (Calibrachoa × hybrida, ‘Kabloom Deep Blue’), geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum, ‘Pinto Premium Salmon’), and marigold (Tagetes erecta, ‘Antigua Orange’) were compared under four light quality treatments: (1) R, “pure” red light (660 nm); (2) B, “pure” blue light (450 nm); (3) BR, “unpure” blue light created by mixing B with a low level of R to provide B/R ≈ 9; (4) BRF, “unpure” blue light created by adding a low level of far red light to BR with red/far red ≈ 1. Continuous (24-h) light-emitting diode lighting with either 100 or 50 μmol m−2 s−1 photosynthetic photon flux density at ≈ 23℃ was used with the above treatments. After 14–20 day of lighting treatment, B promoted elongation growth compared to R, as demonstrated by a greater canopy height, main stem length, internode length, and daily main stem extension rate. However, BR showed similar or inhibitory effects on these traits relative to R, while BRF exhibited similar promotion effects as B. The calculated phytochrome photoequilibrium, an indication of phytochrome activity, was higher for R (0.89) and BR (0.74) than for B (0.49) and BRF (0.63). Adding red (or far red) light reversed the effects of B (or BR) on elongation growth and the phytochrome photoequilibrium, suggesting that blue light promotion of elongation growth is related to the lower phytochrome activity. Also, B and BRF, when compared to R or BR, promoted elongation growth to a greater degree at 50 than 100 μmol m−2 s−1 for petunia and calibrachoa. In addition to the promoted elongation growth, B and BRF reduced side branch number, biomass allocation to side branches, leaf epinasty, leaf angle, and/or leaf chlorophyll content relative to R or BR, but increased individual leaf area, petiole length, and/or biomass allocation to main stem, which varied with different species. It suggests that the promoted elongation growth by blue light associated with lower phytochrome activity is one of shade-avoidance responses with varying sensitivity among species.
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ISSN (up) 0098-8472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1973
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Author Levin, N.; Ali, S.; Crandall, D.
Title Utilizing remote sensing and big data to quantify conflict intensity: The Arab Spring as a case study Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Applied Geography Abbreviated Journal Applied Geography
Volume 94 Issue Pages 1-17
Keywords Remote Sensing; Society; Human Health
Abstract Tracking global and regional conflict zones requires spatially explicit information in near real-time. Here, we examined the potential of remote sensing time-series data (night lights) and big data (data mining of news events and Flickr photos) for monitoring and understanding crisis development and refugee flows. We used the recent Arab Spring as a case study, and examined temporal trends in monthly time series of variables which we hypothesized to indicate conflict intensity, covering all Arab countries. Both Flickr photos and night-time lights proved as sensitive indicators for loss of economic and human capital, and news items from the Global Data on Events, Location and Tone (GDELT) project on fight events were positively correlated with actual deaths from conflicts. We propose that big data and remote sensing datasets have potential to provide disaggregated and timely data on conflicts where official statistics are lacking, offering an effective approach for monitoring geopolitical and environmental changes on Earth.
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ISSN (up) 0143-6228 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1918
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Author Tan, M.; Li, X.; Li, S.; Xin, L.; Wang, X.; Li, Q.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Xiang, W.
Title Modeling population density based on nighttime light images and land use data in China Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Applied Geography Abbreviated Journal Applied Geography
Volume 90 Issue Pages 239-247
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Population change is a key variable that influences climate change, ecological construction, soil and water use, and economic growth. Census data are always point data, whereas planar data are often required in scientific research. By using nighttime light (NTL) images and land use data, combined with the fifth and sixth census data of China at the county level, we carried out spatial matching on the population of each county, respectively, and established population density diagrams of China for 2000 and 2010, which had a spatial resolution of 1 × 1 km. The method proposed in this paper is relatively simple and has a high simulation precision. The results showed that during the first ten years of the 21st century, there are some remarkable characteristics in Chinese population spatial pattern change: 1) the “disappearance” of intermediate-density regions; namely, areas with a population density between 500 and 1500 persons/km2 have decreased by 41% during the ten years; 2) continuous growth of high-density regions; namely, areas with a population density of more than 1500 persons/km2 have increased by 76%; 3) an expansion tendency of low-density regions similar to high-density regions.
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ISSN (up) 0143-6228 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2481
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Author Landis, E.G.; Yang, V.; Brown, D.M.; Pardue, M.T.; Read, S.A.
Title Dim Light Exposure and Myopia in Children Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science Abbreviated Journal Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci
Volume 59 Issue 12 Pages 4804-4811
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Purpose: Experimental myopia in animal models suggests that bright light can influence refractive error and prevent myopia. Additionally, animal research indicates activation of rod pathways and circadian rhythms may influence eye growth. In children, objective measures of personal light exposure, recorded by wearable light sensors, have been used to examine the effects of bright light exposure on myopia. The effect of time spent in a broad range of light intensities on childhood refractive development is not known. This study aims to evaluate dim light exposure in myopia. Methods: We reanalyzed previously published data to investigate differences in dim light exposure across myopic and nonmyopic children from the Role of Outdoor Activity in Myopia (ROAM) study in Queensland, Australia. The amount of time children spent in scotopic (<1-1 lux), mesopic (1-30 lux), indoor photopic (>30-1000 lux), and outdoor photopic (>1000 lux) light over both weekdays and weekends was measured with wearable light sensors. Results: We found significant differences in average daily light exposure between myopic and nonmyopic children. On weekends, myopic children received significantly less scotopic light (P = 0.024) and less outdoor photopic light than nonmyopic children (P < 0.001). In myopic children, more myopic refractive errors were correlated with increased time in mesopic light (R = -0.46, P = 0.002). Conclusions: These findings suggest that in addition to bright light exposure, rod pathways stimulated by dim light exposure could be important to human myopia development. Optimal strategies for preventing myopia with environmental light may include both dim and bright light exposure.
Address School of Optometry and Vision Science, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0146-0404 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30347074; PMCID:PMC6181186 Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2097
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