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Author Challéat, S.; Lapostolle, D.; Milian, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Night-time Environment in French Mountain Areas. A Resource and a Transition Operator Towards Sustainability Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Revue de géographie alpine Abbreviated Journal rga  
  Volume 106 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Darkness; Society  
  Abstract This article presents our approach to construct the night-time environment (NE) as an interdisciplinary research subject. Understood within the framework of various French mountain areas, we show that the NE is highly indicative of different development trajectories. We analyse them by combining traditional social science research into territory with the ecosystem approaches of the experimental sciences. We show how the NE resource (NER) is transformed into an operator that facilitates the transition towards sustainability. By highlighting three of the NE’s specifications, this work lays the groundwork for a transdisciplinary approach.  
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  ISSN (up) 0035-1121 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1867  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Charlier, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title “You Know the Pyrenees by Day – Come See Them by Night...” Reflections on in visu Artialisation of Nocturnal Skyscapes in the Pyrenees Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Revue de géographie alpine Abbreviated Journal rga  
  Volume 106 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Society; Economics; Darkness  
  Abstract “Nocturnal skyscapes. You know the Pyrenees by day – come see them by night... ”: thus the title of an exhibition of photographs set up in 2012 by the Pays de Lourdes et des Vallées des Gaves (Hautes-Pyrénées département) to help raise public awareness about the project for the Pic du Midi International Dark Sky Reserve (IDSR), mainly among the local population and stakeholders in the areas concerned.

Although its evocative title might suggest otherwise, this is rather more than an exhibition on the iconic sites of the Pyrenees seen at night. What it seems to do is to bring out new landscapes that are not just “mountainscapes at night”, or simply night-time versions of landscapes seen by day.

The night skies that characterise these landscapes therefore represent an new category, they need to be considered in their entirety as conveying a meaning that encompasses all that is both construed and material in our relationships with landscape. As in many areas with similar projects either in place (North America, Europe) or emerging (the Cévennes and Mercantour national parks in France, for example), the creation of the Pic du Midi IDSR will have helped to bring a new kind of “landscape object” (Besse, 2009) into being in the Pyrenean region.
 
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0035-1121 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1869  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Aubé, M.; Simoneau, A.; Wainscoat, R.; Nelson, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modeling the effects of phosphor converted LED lighting to the night sky of the Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 478 Issue 2 Pages 1776-1783  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract The goal of this study is to evaluate the current level of light pollution in the night sky at the Haleakala Observatory on the island of Maui in Hawaii. This is accomplished with a numerical model that was tested in the first International Dark Sky Reserve located in Mont-Mégantic National Park in Canada. The model uses ground data on the artificial light sources present in the region of study, geographical data, and remotely sensed data for: 1) the nightly upward radiance; 2) the terrain elevation; and, 3) the ground spectral reflectance of the region. The results of the model give a measure of the current state of the sky spectral radiance at the Haleakala Observatory. Then, using the current state as a reference point, multiple light conversion plans are elaborated and evaluated using the model. We can thus estimate the expected impact of each conversion plan on the night sky radiance spectrum. A complete conversion to white (LEDs) with (CCT) of 4000K and 3000K are contrasted with a conversion using (PC) amber (LEDs). We include recommendations concerning the street lamps to be used in sensitive areas like the cities of Kahului and Kihei and suggest best lighting practices related to the color of lamps used at night.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0035-8711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1907  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gaynor, K.M.; Hojnowski, C.E.; Carter, N.H.; Brashares, J.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The influence of human disturbance on wildlife nocturnality Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 360 Issue 6394 Pages 1232-1235  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Rapid expansion of human activity has driven well-documented shifts in the spatial distribution of wildlife, but the cumulative effect of human disturbance on the temporal dynamics of animals has not been quantified. We examined anthropogenic effects on mammal diel activity patterns, conducting a meta-analysis of 76 studies of 62 species from six continents. Our global study revealed a strong effect of humans on daily patterns of wildlife activity. Animals increased their nocturnality by an average factor of 1.36 in response to human disturbance. This finding was consistent across continents, habitats, taxa, and human activities. As the global human footprint expands, temporal avoidance of humans may facilitate human-wildlife coexistence. However, such responses can result in marked shifts away from natural patterns of activity, with consequences for fitness, population persistence, community interactions, and evolution.  
  Address Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher AAAS Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29903973 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1988  
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Author Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lighting up the nighttime Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 362 Issue 6416 Pages 744-746  
  Keywords Commentary  
  Abstract Among the most visually compelling images of the whole Earth have been those created using data obtained at night by astronauts or from satellites. The proliferation in use of electric lighting—including from industrial, commercial, municipal, and domestic sources—is striking. It sketches the spatial distribution of much of the human population, outlining a substantial proportion of the world's coastline, highlighting a multitude of towns and cities, and drawing the major highways that connect them. The data embodied in these nighttime images have been used to estimate and map levels of energy use, urbanization, and economic activity. They have also been key in focusing attention on the environmental impacts of the artificial light at night itself. Explicit steps need to be taken to limit these impacts, which vary according to the intensity, spectrum, spatial extent, and temporal dynamics of this lighting.  
  Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, UK. k.j.gaston@exeter.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30442788 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2058  
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