|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Manfrin, A.; Lehmann, D.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Larsen, S.; Syväranta, J.; Wharton, G.; Voigt, C.C.; Monaghan, M.T.; Hölker, F.
Title Dietary changes in predators and scavengers in a nocturnally illuminated riparian ecosystem Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Oikos Abbreviated Journal Oikos
Volume 127 Issue 7 Pages 960-969
Keywords Ecology; Animals
Abstract Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are linked by fluxes of carbon and nutrients in riparian areas. Processes that alter these fluxes may therefore change the diet and composition of consumer communities. We used stable carbon isotope (δ13C) analyses to test whether the increased abundance of aquatic prey observed in a previous study led to a dietary shift in riparian consumers in areas illuminated by artificial light at night (ALAN). We measured the contribution of aquatic-derived carbon to diets in riparian arthropods in experimentally lit and unlit sites along an agricultural drainage ditch in northern Germany. The δ13C signature of the spider Pachygnatha clercki (Tetragnathidae) was 0.7‰ lower in the ALAN-illuminated site in summer, indicating a greater assimilation of aquatic prey. Bayesian mixing models also supported higher intake of aquatic prey under ALAN in summer (34% versus 21%). In contrast, isotopic signatures for P. clercki (0.3‰) and Pardosa prativaga (0.7‰) indicated a preference for terrestrial prey in the illuminated site in summer. Terrestrial prey intake increased in spring for P. clercki under ALAN (from 70% to 74%) and in spring and autumn for P. prativaga (from 68% to 77% and from 67% to 72%) and Opiliones (from 68% to 72%; 68% to 75%). This was despite most of the available prey (up to 80%) being aquatic in origin. We conclude that ALAN changed the diet of riparian secondary consumers by increasing the density of both aquatic and terrestrial prey. Dietary changes were species- and season-specific, indicating that the effects of ALAN may interact with phenology and feeding strategy. Because streetlights can occur in high density near freshwaters, ALAN may have widespread effects on aquatic-terrestrial ecosystem linkages.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0030-1299 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1811
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author McMahon, D.M.
Title Illuminating the Enlightenment: Public Lighting Practices in the Siècle Des Lumières* Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Past & Present Abbreviated Journal
Volume 240 Issue 1 Pages 119-159
Keywords History; Psychology
Abstract This article explores the relationship between the Enlightenment as a cultural and intellectual phenomenon and actual illumination in the long 18th century. Focused on street lighting in Paris, it nonetheless seeks to situate the French case in the broader context of developments in public lighting in the French provinces, Europe, and the Atlantic World. In the concerted effort to illuminate dark streets, the Enlightenment was operationalized in ways that bore fundamentally on commerce, sociability, and perceptions of progress, enlightened government, and enlightened space. At the same time, the attempt to illuminate formerly dark spaces generated reactions. A ‘dialectic of illumination’ was the counterpart to the dialectic of Enlightenment, fostering resistance to the new regime of light and its efforts to impose, through human ingenuity and instrumental reason, greater security and social control.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0031-2746 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1972
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bian, Z.; Yang, Q.; Li, T.; Cheng, R.; Barnett, Y.; Lu, C.
Title Study of the beneficial effects of green light on lettuce grown under short-term continuous red and blue light-emitting diodes Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Physiologia Plantarum Abbreviated Journal Physiol Plant
Volume 164 Issue 2 Pages 226-240
Keywords Plants
Abstract Red and blue light are the most important light spectra for driving photosynthesis to produce adequate crop yield. It is also believed that green light may contribute to adaptations to growth. However, the effects of green light, which can trigger specific and necessary responses of plant growth, have been underestimated in the past. In this study, lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) was exposed to different continuous light (CL) conditions for 48 h by a combination of red and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) supplemented with or without green LEDs, in an environmental-controlled growth chamber. Green light supplementation enhanced photosynthetic capacity by increasing net photosynthetic rates (Pn ), maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv /Fm ), electron transport for carbon fixation (JPSII ) and chlorophyll content in plants under the CL treatment. Green light decreased malondialdehyde and H2 O2 accumulation by increasing the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.1.1) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11) after 24 h of CL. Supplemental green light significantly increased the expression of photosynthetic genes LHCb and PsbA from 6 to 12 h, and these gene expression were maintained at higher levels than those under other light conditions between 12 and 24 h. However, a notable down-regulation of both LHCb and PsbA was observed during 24 to 48 h. These results indicate that the effects of green light on lettuce plant growth, via enhancing activity of particular components of antioxidantive enzyme system and promoting of LHCb and PsbA expression to maintain higher photosynthetic capacity, alleviated a number of the negative effects caused by CL.
Address School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Science, Brackenhurst Campus, Nottingham Trent University, NG25 0QF, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0031-9317 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29493775 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1905
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Russart, K.L.G.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Light at night as an environmental endocrine disruptor Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav
Volume 190 Issue Pages 82-89
Keywords Human Health; Animals
Abstract Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are often consequences of human activity; however, the effects of EEDs are not limited to humans. A primary focus over the past approximately 30years has been on chemical EEDs, but the repercussions of non-chemical EEDs, such as artificial light at night (LAN), are of increasing interest. The sensitivity of the circadian system to light and the influence of circadian organization on overall physiology and behavior make the system a target for disruption with widespread effects. Indeed, there is increasing evidence for a role of LAN in human health, including disruption of circadian regulation and melatonin signaling, metabolic dysregulation, cancer risk, and disruption of other hormonally-driven systems. These effects are not limited to humans; domesticated animals as well as wildlife are also exposed to LAN, and at risk for disrupted circadian rhythms. Here, we review data that support the role of LAN as an endocrine disruptor in humans to be considered in treatments and lifestyle suggestions. We also present the effects of LAN in other animals, and discuss the potential for ecosystem-wide effects of artificial LAN. This can inform decisions in agricultural practices and urban lighting decisions to avoid unintended outcomes.
Address Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0031-9384 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28870443 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1719
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cleary-Gaffney, M.; Coogan, A.N.
Title Limited evidence for affective and diurnal rhythm responses to dim light-at-night in male and female C57Bl/6 mice Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav
Volume 189 Issue Pages 78-85
Keywords Animals
Abstract Circadian rhythms are recurring patterns in a range of behavioural, physiological and molecular parameters that display periods of near 24h, and are underpinned by an endogenous biological timekeeping system. Circadian clocks are increasingly recognised as being key for health. Environmental light is the key stimulus that synchronises the internal circadian system with the external time cues. There are emergent health concerns regarding increasing worldwide prevalence of electric lighting, especially man-made light-at-night, and light's impact on the circadian system may be central to these effects. A number of previous studies have demonstrated increased depression-like behaviour in various rodent experimental models exposed to dim light-at-night. In this study we set out to study the impact of dim light-at-night on circadian and affective behaviours in C57Bl/6 mice. We set out specifically to examine the impact of sex on light at night's effects, as well as the impact of housing conditions. We report minimal impact of light-at-night on circadian and affective behaviours, as measured by the tail suspension test, the forced swim test, the sucrose preference test and the elevated plus maze. Light-at-night was also not associated with an increase in body weight, but was associated with a decrease in the cell proliferation marker Ki-67 in the dentate gyrus. In summary, we conclude that experimental contextual factors, such as model species or strain, may be considerable importance in the investigation of the impact of light at night on mood-related parameters.
Address Department of Psychology, Maynooth University, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Ireland. Electronic address: andrew.coogan@mu.ie
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0031-9384 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29540316 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1826
Permanent link to this record