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Author Kumar, P.; Sajjad, H.; Joshi, P.K.; Elvidge, C.D.; Rehman, S.; Chaudhary, B.S.; Tripathy, B.R.; Singh, J.; Pipal, G.
Title Modeling the luminous intensity of Beijing, China using DMSP-OLS night-time lights series data for estimating population density Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, Parts A/B/C Abbreviated Journal Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, Parts A/B/C
Volume 109 Issue Pages 31-39
Keywords (up) Remote Sensing
Abstract Various scientific researches were conducted to monitor human activities and natural phenomena with the availability of various night time satellite data such as Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMPS). Population growth especially in a faster growing economy like China is an important indicator for assessing socio-economic development, urban planning and environmental management. Thus, spatial distribution of population is instrumental in assessing growth and developmental activities in Beijing city of China. The satellite observation data derived from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) was utilized to estimate population density through the measurement of light flux with radiometric recording. The data was calibrated using C0, C1, C2 parameters before processing. Population density of Beijing city was estimated using light volume of this calibrated data. Regression analysis between urban population and light volume revealed high correlation (r2=0.89)r2=0.89). Thus, population density can effectively be estimated using light intensity. The model used for estimating urban population density can effectively be utilized for other major cities of the world.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1474-7065 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1934
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Author Fehrer, D.; Krarti, M.
Title Spatial distribution of building energy use in the United States through satellite imagery of the earth at night Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Building and Environment Abbreviated Journal Building and Environment
Volume 142 Issue Pages 252-264
Keywords (up) remote sensing
Abstract Despite the importance of geospatial analysis of energy use in buildings, the data available for such exercises is limited. A potential solution is to use geospatial information, such as that obtained from satellites, to disaggregate building energy use data to a more useful scale. Many researchers have used satellite imagery to estimate the extent of human activities, including building energy use and population distribution. Much of the reported work has been carried out in rapidly developing countries such as India and China where urban development is dynamic and not always easy to measure. In countries with less rapid urbanization, such as the United States, there is still value in using satellite imagery to estimate building energy use for the purposes of identifying energy efficiency opportunities and planning electricity transmission. This study evaluates nighttime light imagery obtained from the VIIRS instrument aboard the SUOMI NPP satellite as a predictor of building energy use intensity within states, counties, and cities in the United States. It is found that nighttime lights can explain upwards of 90% of the variability in energy consumption in the United States, depending on conditions and geospatial scale. The results of this research are used to generate electricity and fuel consumption maps of the United States with a resolution of less than 200 square meters. The methodologies undertaken in this study can be replicated globally to create more opportunities for geospatial energy analysis without the hurdles often associated with disaggregated building energy use data collection.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0360-1323 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1938
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Author Zheng, Q.; Weng, Q.; Huang, L.; Wang, K.; Deng, J.; Jiang, R.; Ye, Z.; Gan, M.
Title A new source of multi-spectral high spatial resolution night-time light imagery—JL1-3B Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 215 Issue Pages 300-312
Keywords (up) Remote Sensing
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) provides a unique footprint of human activities and settlements. However, the adverse effects of ALAN on human health and ecosystems have not been well understood. Because of a lack of high resolution data, studies of ALAN in China have been confined to coarse resolution, and fine-scale details are missing. The fine details of ALAN are pertinent, because the highly dense population in Chinese cities has created a distinctive urban lighting pattern. In this paper, we introduced a new generation of high spatial resolution and multi-spectral night-time light imagery from the satellite JL1-3B. We examined its effectiveness for monitoring the spatial pattern and discriminating the types of artificial light based on a case study of Hangzhou, China. Specifically, local Moran's I analysis was applied to identify artificial light hotspots. Then, we analyzed the relationship between artificial light brightness and land uses at the parcel-level, which were generated from GF-2 imagery and open social datasets. Third, a machine learning based method was proposed to discriminate the type of lighting sources – between high pressure sodium lamps (HPS) and light-emitting diode lamps (LED) – by incorporating their spectral information and morphology feature. The result shows a complicated heterogeneity of illumination characteristics across different land uses, where main roads, commercial and institutional areas were brightly lit while residential area, industrial area and agricultural land were dark at night. It further shows that the proposed method was effective at separating light emitted by HPS and LED, with an overall accuracy and kappa coefficient of 83.86% and 0.67, respectively. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of JL1-3B and its superiority over previous night-time light data in detecting details of lighting objects and the nightscape pattern, and suggests that JL1-3B and alike could open up new opportunities for the advancement of night-time remote sensing.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1945
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Author Ge, W.; Yang, H.; Zhu, X.; Ma, M.; Yang, Y.
Title Ghost City Extraction and Rate Estimation in China Based on NPP-VIIRS Night-Time Light Data Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information Abbreviated Journal Ijgi
Volume 7 Issue 6 Pages 219
Keywords (up) Remote Sensing
Abstract The ghost city phenomenon is a serious problem resulting from the rapid urbanization process in China. Estimation of the ghost city rate (GCR) can provide information about vacant dwellings. This paper developed a methodology to quantitatively evaluate GCR values at the national scale using multi-resource remote sensing data. The Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership–Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer (NPP-VIIRS) night-time light data and moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) land cover data were used in the evaluation of the GCR values in China. The average ghost city rate (AGCR) was 35.1% in China in 2013. Shanghai had the smallest AGCR of 21.7%, while Jilin has the largest AGCR of 47.27%. There is a significant negative correlation between both the provincial AGCR and the per capita disposable income of urban households (R = −0.659, p < 0.01) and the average selling prices of commercial buildings (R =−0.637, p < 0.01). In total, 31 ghost cities are mainly concentrated in the economically underdeveloped inland provinces. Ghost city areas are mainly located on the edge of urban built-up areas, and the spatial pattern of ghost city areas changed in different regions. This approach combines statistical data with the distribution of vacant urban areas, which is an effective method to capture ghost city information.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2220-9964 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1949
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Author Jiang, W.; He, G.; Leng, W.; Long, T.; Wang, G.; Liu, H.; Peng, Y.; Yin, R.; Guo, H.
Title Characterizing Light Pollution Trends across Protected Areas in China Using Nighttime Light Remote Sensing Data Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information Abbreviated Journal Ijgi
Volume 7 Issue 7 Pages 243
Keywords (up) Remote Sensing
Abstract Protected areas (PAs) with natural, ecological, and cultural value play important roles related to biological processes, biodiversity, and ecosystem services. Over the past four decades, the spatial range and intensity of light pollution in China has experienced an unprecedented increase. Few studies have been documented on the light pollution across PAs in China, especially in regions that provide a greater amount of important biodiversity conservation. Here, nighttime light satellite images from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) were selected to characterize light pollution trends across PAs using nighttime light indexes and hot spot analysis, and then the light pollution changes in PAs were classified. Furthermore, the causes of light pollution changes in PAs were determined using high-resolution satellite images and statistical data. The results showed the following: (1) Approximately 57.30% of PAs had an increasing trend from 1992 to 2012, and these PAs were mainly located in the eastern region, the central region, and a small part of the western region of China. Hot spot analysis showed that the patterns of change for the total night light and night light mean had spatial agglomeration characteristics; (2) The PAs affected by light pollution changes were divided into eight classes, of which PAs with stable trends accounted for 41%, and PAs with high increasing trends accounted for 10%. PAs that had high increasing trends with low density accounted for the smallest amount, i.e., only 1%; (3) The factors influencing light pollution changes in PAs included the distance to urban areas, mineral exploitation, and tourism development and the migration of residents. Finally, based on the status of light pollution encroachment into PAs, strategies to control light pollution and enhance the sustainable development of PAs are recommended.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2220-9964 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1952
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