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Author Stafstrom, J.A.; Hebets, E.A.
Title Male attraction to female airborne cues by the net-casting spider, Deinopis spinosa Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Behavioural Processes Abbreviated Journal Behav Processes
Volume 159 Issue Pages 23-30
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract For many animals, finding a mate can be a difficult task. For males, it often involves actively searching for conspecific females, sometimes over great distances. This mate-searching can be aided through chemical or visual signals or cues produced by sexually receptive females. Here, we investigate the roles of olfaction and vision in mate-searching in a strictly nocturnal net-casting spider, Deinopis spinosa. First, we used an olfactometer assay to determine if mature male D. spinosa respond to conspecific airborne cues. We found that mature males, but not mature females, were attracted to airborne cues of mature female conspecifics. We next investigated the relative importance of olfaction and vision in male mate-searching. While manipulating airflow and light levels in screened enclosures in the laboratory, we tested freely moving mature males for mate-searching success. We found no effect of our airflow treatment on mate-searching success. Light levels, however, affected mate-searching in an unexpected way – males were more likely to locate females in complete darkness when compared to dim-light conditions. Our results suggest that visual cues are not necessary for successful male mate-searching in D. spinosa, but that the visual environment can nonetheless influence male behavior. In summary, we provide evidence suggesting that airborne cues, but not visual cues, are important in D. spinosa male mate-searching efforts, though the source of these chemical airborne cues remains unknown.
Address University of Nebraska – Lincoln, School of Biological Sciences, NE, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0376-6357 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30562562 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2152
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Author Wakefield, A.; Broyles, M.; Stone, E.L.; Harris, S.; Jones, G.; Minderman, J.
Title Quantifying the attractiveness of broad-spectrum street lights to aerial nocturnal insects Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Appl Ecol
Volume 55 Issue 2 Pages 714-722
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Sodium street lights, dominated by long wavelengths of light, are being replaced by broad‐spectrum, white lights globally, in particular light‐emitting diodes (LEDs). These white lights typically require less energy to operate and are therefore considered “eco‐friendly”. However, little attention has been paid to the impacts white lights may have upon local wildlife populations.

We compared insect attraction to orange (high‐pressure sodium, HPS) and white (metal halide, MH and LED) street lights experimentally using portable street lights and custom‐made flight intercept traps.

Significantly more (greater than five times as many) insects were attracted to white MH street lights than white (4,250 K) LED and HPS lights. There was no statistical difference in the numbers of insects attracted to LED and HPS lights for most taxa caught. However, rarefaction shows a greater diversity of insects caught at LED than HPS lights.

Policy implications. With the current, large‐scale conversion to white light‐emitting diode (LED) lighting, our results give insight into how changes to street light technology may affect wildlife populations and communities. We recommend avoiding metal halide light installations as they attract many more insects than competing technologies. We highlight the need to tailor LED lighting to prevent disturbances across multiple insect taxa.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2224
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Author Hoyos-Díaz, J. M., Villalba-Alemán, E., Ramoni-Perazzi, P., & Muñoz-Romo, M.
Title Impact of artificial lighting on capture success in two species of frugivorous bats (chiroptera: phyllostomidae) in an urban locality from the Venezuelan Andes Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Mastozoologia Neotropical Abbreviated Journal
Volume 25 Issue 2 Pages
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Artificial light is becoming a major issue for bats because it affects critical activities such as foraging, reproduction, and communication. We assessed the effect of artificial lighting on Artibeus lituratus and Artibeus jamaicensis in a small secondary growth forest patch near a street subjected to unexpected illumination. Bats were captured in the forest patch using a 12-m long mist net. Results indicated a nearly six-fold, significant decrease in capture success after the street lamps were installed. Artificial light from street lamps functions as a “light barrier” that inhibits bats from conducting short and long-distance movements, which might have detrimental consequences for bats and the plants they disperse. RESUMEN. Impacto de la luz artificial en el éxito de captura de dos especies de murciélagos frugívoros (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) en una localidad urbana de Los Andes venezolanos. La luz artificial se ha convertido en un problema grave para los murciélagos, porque está afectando actividades críticas que incluyen forrajeo, reproducción y comunicación. Evaluamos el efecto de la luz artificial en los murciélagos frugívoros Artibeus lituratus y Artibeus jamaicensis, en un pequeño parche de bosque secundario, cercano a una calle sujeta a una iluminación artificial inesperada. Capturamos a los murciélagos en el bosque secundario, empleando una red de neblina de 12 m de longitud. Los resultados indican que el éxito de captura disminuyó significativamente casi seis veces después de la instalación de los bombillos. La luz artificial de las lámparas funciona como “barreras u obstáculos de luz” que inhiben a los murciélagos de realizar movimientos de corta y larga distancia, lo cual podría tener consecuencias perjudiciales para los murciélagos y las plantas que ellos dispersan.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2318
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Author Stock, D. M.
Title LOCALIZED LIGHT SENSORY IN RELATION TO GRAZING ACTIVITY OF ECHINOMETRA MATHAEI Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract This paper offers insight on the regulation of nocturnal behavior in burrowing sea urchin Echinometra mathaei of the Pacific. While it is known E. mathaei maintains nocturnal hours of activity (primarily grazing, burrowing, and locomotion), it is unknown whether this pattern follows a circadian rhythm or responds to local conditions of darkness. Varying light treatments were tested to determine potential manipulation of active behavior and explore potential for habitat destruction. Light manipulation was used to determine the role light sensory plays in the regulation of normal behavior. First utilizing gradual manipulation and later utilizing sudden manipulation to differentiate response to light stimuli. It was determined that while E. mathaei maintains nocturnal

activity via localized light sensory, manipulation of latent hours could not be significantly reproduced. It was found that while light manipulation can be responsible for simulating hours of activity, light manipulation cannot replicate latent hours. Upon exploration of predator response capability in E. mathaei following manipulation, it was found that individuals exposed to prolonged periods of artificial light had slower predation response times than individuals acclimated to a regular pattern of light exposure. These findings connect potential habitat degradation via grazing behaviors of E. mathaei to anthropogenic activity in Mo’orea, French Polynesia.
Address
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2653
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Author Syposz, M.; Gonçalves, F.; Carty, M.; Hoppitt, W.; Manco, F.
Title Factors influencing Manx Shearwater grounding on the west coast of Scotland Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Ibis Abbreviated Journal Ibis
Volume 160 Issue 4 Pages 846-854
Keywords (up) Animals
Abstract Grounding of thousands of newly fledged petrels and shearwaters (family Procellariidae) in built‐up areas due to artificial light is a global problem. Due to their anatomy these grounded birds find it difficult to take off from built‐up areas and many fall victim to predation, cars, dehydration or starvation. This research investigated a combination of several factors that may influence the number of Manx Shearwater Puffinus puffinus groundings in a coastal village of Scotland located close to a nesting site for this species. A model was developed that used meteorological variables and moon cycle to predict the daily quantity of birds that were recovered on the ground. The model, explaining 46.32% of the variance of the data, revealed how new moon and strong onshore winds influence grounding. To a lesser extent, visibility conditions can also have an effect on grounding probabilities. The analysis presented in this study can improve rescue campaigns of not only Manx Shearwaters but also other species attracted to the light pollution by predicting conditions leading to an increase in the number of groundings. It could also inform local authorities when artificial light intensity needs to be reduced.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0019-1019 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2778
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