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Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K. M., & Schieck, A. F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Designing digital displays and interactive media in today’s cities by night. Do we know enough about attracting attention to do so? Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Conscious Cities Anthology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords (up) Commentary; Lighting  
  Abstract With the huge transformation in the development of digital screen technology and its consistently decreasing cost, digital billboards are progressively replacing traditional static, two-dimensional poster advertisements in our cities1. Previously, due to the substantial expenditure involved, they were only available to major international brands with vast promotional resources to build their brand fame. Today, however, they are being used increasingly by advertisers to deliver all kinds of messages from simple ones to more sophisticated, interactive storytelling. Soon, however, even newer ways of purchasing advertisements using computers will be introduced by the outdoor media industry to address the public, so potentially everybody will be able to rent out available advertising space and communicate the message. But are we ready for this next step? As there are no proper guidelines or regulations in place for this new medium in the urban realm, today we are facing issues such as no integration of the display’s location into the built environment, no specifications based on knowledge of human perception and the human centric design approach, no control over its content quality, and so called ‘display blindness’2 seems to be a common collective urban experience at night. Taking London as one of the most cutting-edge outdoor digital advertising environments in the world3 (with the largest number of these screens traditionally located in or in close proximity to Piccadilly Circus) this paper discusses various aspects of this new medium. Besides the layout and geometry of the space, it also focuses on navigation and attracting the visual attention of passers-by at night in a practical human oriented context. Additionally, questions regarding complex sensory, social, special and interactional issues and the necessity for interdisciplinary collaboration have been addressed.  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2351  
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Author Boyce, P.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Present and Future of Lighting Research Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication SDAR* Journal of Sustainable Design & Applied Research Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords (up) Commentary; Lighting; Vision; Human Health  
  Abstract The aim of this paper is to consider where lighting research is today and what its future might be. There is little doubt that, today, lighting research is an active field. A brief review of the topics being studied reveals that they range from residual studies on visibility and visual discomfort, through attempts to identify the influence of lighting on factors beyond visibility such as mood and behaviour, to the whole new field of light and health. But activity alone is not enough to justify a future. For lighting research to have a future it is necessary for it to

be influential. To become influential, research needs to focus its attention on outcomes that matter to people and the elements of those outcomes on which lighting is known to have a major influence. Further, researchers will have to be determined to overcome the barriers to changing lighting practice. By doing this, lighting research may change the world for the better, to be an important topic, not an irrelevance.
 
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  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2113  
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Author Challéat, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Le socioécosystème environnement nocturne : un objet de recherche interdisciplinaire Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Natures Sciences Sociétés Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 26 Issue 3 Pages 257-269  
  Keywords (up) Commentary; Review  
  Abstract Résumé

Cet article expose le cheminement par lequel nous constituons lʼenvironnement nocturne en objet de recherche interdisciplinaire. Apparue dans les années 1990 suite à la requalification environnementale de lʼéclairage urbain en pollution lumineuse, cette notion floue vise à appréhender les systèmes – humains ou non – fonctionnellement liés à la nuit et à lʼobscurité. En nous appuyant sur lʼobservation des processus de construction, de légitimation et de territorialisation de lʼenvironnement nocturne, nous montrons que cette notion opère une jonction entre différentes acceptions et approches fortement cloisonnées des rôles, fonctions et effets de lʼéclairage artificiel nocturne (ALAN, pour artificial light at night1). Nous proposons dʼaborder son étude suivant le cadre dʼanalyse des socioécosystèmes qui nécessite la mise en interaction des différentes approches de lʼALAN par les sciences de la société et les sciences du vivant.

Abstract

This paper explains the scientific reasoning that led us to institute the “night environment” as new interdisciplinary research topic from a social-ecological perspective. Sociocultural, ecological and health costs of artificial light at night (ALAN) have been gradually highlighted since the second half of the twentieth century in a range of scientific fields, from astronomy to medicine through ecology and energy. At the same time an environmentalist movement was emerging: the “dark-sky movement” which condemns “light pollution” and carries its demands within local, national or international arenas. In the 1990s, the requalification of urban lighting as light pollution gave rise to the ill-defined notion of night environment. This notion aims to understand the systems, both human and non-human, that are functionally related to the night and darkness. Building on medium and long-term observations of the processes of construction, legitimation and territorialization of the nocturnal environment, we demonstrate that this notion enables to establish a junction between the different strongly compartmentalized meanings and approaches of the roles, functions and effects of ALAN, and more specifically of urban lighting. We propose to approach its study based on the social-ecological systems framework. This requires creating strong interactions between the different approaches of ALAN: those of the social sciences and those of the experimental, life and health sciences.
 
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  Language French Summary Language Original Title  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2317  
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Author Manning, R., Newman, P., Barber, J., Monz, C., Hallo, J., & Lawson, S. openurl 
  Title Principles for Studying and Managing Natural Quiet and Natural Darkness in National Parks and Other Protected Areas Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The George Wright Forum Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 35 Issue 3 Pages 350-362  
  Keywords (up) Conservation; Planning; Regulation  
  Abstract A substantial body of research on natural quiet and natural darkness in national

parks, and protected areas more broadly, has been reported in the scientific and professional literature in recent years. However, this literature is widely scattered over many academic and professional journals that cover both the natural and social sciences. To help integrate and synthesize this body of work, we surveyed this diverse literature and collected representative examples in a book (Manning et al. 2018). We conclude our book with a series of principles

that we have distilled to help guide park managers to protect natural quiet and natural darkness. This paper presents those principles.

Much of our book focuses on national parks in the United States, and in the remainder of this paper the phrase “the national parks” refers to them. But we feel that the principles we have derived from our review of the scientific and professional literature on natural quiet and natural darkness apply equally well to a variety of parks and protected areas in the United States and elsewhere.

Natural quiet is generally defined as the sounds of nature uninterrupted by human-caused noise, and natural darkness is darkness unaffected by human-caused light. It is important to note that natural quiet and natural darkness do not necessarily mean absolute quiet or darkness, as the natural world often generates sounds of its own (e.g., birds calling, wind blowing,

rivers rushing) and has sources of illumination (e.g., the glow of celestial bodies and the fluorescence of some plants and animals).
 
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2297  
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Author Benfield, J.A.; Nutt, R.J.; Taff, B.D.; Miller, Z.D.; Costigan, H.; Newman, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A laboratory study of the psychological impact of light pollution in National Parks Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Environmental Psychology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Environmental Psychology  
  Volume 57 Issue Pages 67-72  
  Keywords (up) Conservation; Skyglow; Psychology  
  Abstract Light pollution is ubiquitous in much of the developed and developing world, including rural and wilderness areas. Other sources of pollution, such as noise or motorized vehicle emissions, are known to impact the perceived quality of natural settings as well as the psychological well-being and satisfaction of visitors to those locations, but the effects of light pollution on visitors to natural settings is largely unstudied. Using experimental manipulations of light pollution levels in virtual reality simulations of three U.S. National Parks, the current study aimed to provide initial evidence of an effect on visitors. Results show that light pollution impacts a range of psychological and scene evaluation dimensions but that pristine night skies are not necessarily viewed as the ideal, likely due to being viewed as unfamiliar or unrealistic because so few have experienced the true baseline.  
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  ISSN 0272-4944 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1941  
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