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Author Russart, K.L.G.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light at night as an environmental endocrine disruptor Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav  
  Volume 190 Issue Pages 82-89  
  Keywords (up) Human Health; Animals  
  Abstract Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are often consequences of human activity; however, the effects of EEDs are not limited to humans. A primary focus over the past approximately 30years has been on chemical EEDs, but the repercussions of non-chemical EEDs, such as artificial light at night (LAN), are of increasing interest. The sensitivity of the circadian system to light and the influence of circadian organization on overall physiology and behavior make the system a target for disruption with widespread effects. Indeed, there is increasing evidence for a role of LAN in human health, including disruption of circadian regulation and melatonin signaling, metabolic dysregulation, cancer risk, and disruption of other hormonally-driven systems. These effects are not limited to humans; domesticated animals as well as wildlife are also exposed to LAN, and at risk for disrupted circadian rhythms. Here, we review data that support the role of LAN as an endocrine disruptor in humans to be considered in treatments and lifestyle suggestions. We also present the effects of LAN in other animals, and discuss the potential for ecosystem-wide effects of artificial LAN. This can inform decisions in agricultural practices and urban lighting decisions to avoid unintended outcomes.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28870443 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1719  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stern, M.; Broja, M.; Sansone, R.; Grone, M.; Skene, S.S.; Liebmann, J.; Suschek, C.V.; Born, M.; Kelm, M.; Heiss, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Blue light exposure decreases systolic blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and improves endothelial function in humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication European Journal of Preventive Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Prev Cardiol  
  Volume 25 Issue 17 Pages 1875-1883  
  Keywords (up) Human Health; Blue light; blood pressure; endothelial function; forearm blood flow; pulse wave velocity  
  Abstract AIMS: Previous studies have shown that ultraviolet light can lead to the release of nitric oxide from the skin and decrease blood pressure. In contrast to visible light the local application of ultraviolet light bears a cancerogenic risk. Here, we investigated whether whole body exposure to visible blue light can also decrease blood pressure and increase endothelial function in healthy subjects. METHODS: In a randomised crossover study, 14 healthy male subjects were exposed on 2 days to monochromatic blue light or blue light with a filter foil (control light) over 30 minutes. We measured blood pressure (primary endpoint), heart rate, forearm vascular resistance, forearm blood flow, endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation), pulse wave velocity and plasma nitric oxide species, nitrite and nitroso compounds (secondary endpoints) during and up to 2 hours after exposure. RESULTS: Blue light exposure significantly decreased systolic blood pressure and increased heart rate as compared to control. In parallel, blue light significantly increased forearm blood flow, flow-mediated dilation, circulating nitric oxide species and nitroso compounds while it decreased forearm vascular resistance and pulse wave velocity. CONCLUSION: Whole body irradiation with visible blue light at real world doses improves blood pressure, endothelial function and arterial stiffness by nitric oxide released from photolabile intracutanous nitric oxide metabolites into circulating blood.  
  Address Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Stag Hill, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK. Email: c.heiss(at)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2047-4873 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30196723 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2157  
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Author Czeisler, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Housing Immigrant Children – The Inhumanity of Constant Illumination Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The New England Journal of Medicine Abbreviated Journal N Engl J Med  
  Volume 379 Issue 2 Pages e3  
  Keywords (up) Human Health; Commentary  
  Abstract  
  Address From the Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and the Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School – both in Boston  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-4793 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29932841 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1942  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Spitschan, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comment on 'Domestic light at night and breast cancer risk: a prospective analysis of 105000 UK women in the Generations Study' Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication British Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Br J Cancer  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords (up) Human Health; Commentary  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-0920 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30584260 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2145  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jones, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spillover health effects of energy efficiency investments: Quasi-experimental evidence from the Los Angeles LED streetlight program Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Environmental Economics and Management Abbreviated Journal Journal of Environmental Economics and Management  
  Volume 88 Issue Pages 283-299  
  Keywords (up) Human Health; LED; public health; outdoor lighting; Los Angeles; economics; energy efficiency; breast cancer; fossil fuel carbon emissions  
  Abstract Payback estimates of energy efficiency investments often ignore public health externalities. This is problematic in cases where spillover health effects are substantial, such as when the application of new technology alters environmental exposures. When health externalities are included in return on investment calculations, energy efficiency programs may look more or less attractive than suggested by conventional “energy savings only” estimates. This analysis exploits the quasi-experiment provided by the 2009 Los Angeles (LA) LED streetlight efficiency program to investigate the returns on investments inclusive of an originally estimated health externality. Using the synthetic control method, we find that the LED streetlight program is associated with a lagged increase in breast cancer mortality of 0.479 per 100,000. Inclusive of the effects of LEDs on breast cancer and avoided carbon emissions, the LA LED program provides a −146.2% 10-year return compared to +118.2% when health outcomes and carbon emissions are ignored.  
  Address Department of Economics, University of New Mexico, 1 UNM Drive, MSC 05 3060, Albuquerque, NM, 87131, USA; bajones(at)unm.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0095-0696 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1976  
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