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Author Van der Westhuyzen, J.G.J., Leuschner, F.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of age on white light perception Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 29-43  
  Keywords Vision; Psychology  
  Abstract The way that persons from different age groups experience “white light” is investigated. Human eye lens transmission changes spectrally with age and this may influence the way that humans from different ages experiences light. Such a difference may be important in industrial and medical environments. Two different age groups, one group younger than 40 years of age and another group older than 50 years of age were subjected to the same “white” definition task.A conventional single-booth setup was used where observers were able to adjust the intensity of four coloured LED’s.Results of the psychophysical test procedure were used to generate specifications of two light sources, as selected by the two age groups. The two age groups selected different light sources when tasked to achieve a “perception” of white. Results show that the older group prefers a source with a colour rendering index number of 89 and the younger group prefers a source with a colour rendering index number of 74. The sources selectedby the two age groups specifycorrelated colour temperature values of 5150 K for the older age group and 6592 K for the younger group.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2065  
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Author Bará, S., Lima, R.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Photons without borders: quantifying light pollution transfer between territories Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 51-61  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract The light pollution levels experienced at any given site generally depend on a wide number of artificial light sources distributed throughout the surrounding territory. Since photons can travel long distances before being scattered by the atmosphere, any effective proposal for reducing local light pollution levels needs an accurate assessment of the relative weight of all intervening light sources, including those located tens or even hundreds of km away. In this paper we describe several ways of quantifying and visualizing these relative weights. Particular emphasis is made on the aggregate contribution of the municipalities, which are -in many regions of the world- the administrative bodies primarily responsible for the planning and maintenance of public outdoor lighting systems.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2066  
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Author Hopkins, G.R.; Gaston, K.J.; Visser, M.E.; Elgar, M.A.; Jones, T.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night as a driver of evolution across urban-rural landscapes Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Abbreviated Journal Front Ecol Environ  
  Volume 16 Issue 8 Pages 472-479  
  Keywords Ecology, Commentary  
  Abstract Light is fundamental to biological systems, affecting the daily rhythms of bacteria, plants, and animals. Artificial light at night (ALAN), a ubiquitous feature of urbanization, interferes with these rhythms and has the potential to exert strong selection pressures on organisms living in urban environments. ALAN also fragments landscapes, altering the movement of animals into and out of artificially lit habitats. Although research has documented phenotypic and genetic differentiation between urban and rural organisms, ALAN has rarely been considered as a driver of evolution. We argue that the fundamental importance of light to biological systems, and the capacity for ALAN to influence multiple processes contributing to evolution, makes this an important driver of evolutionary change, one with the potential to explain broad patterns of population differentiation across urban–rural landscapes. Integrating ALAN's evolutionary potential into urban ecology is a targeted and powerful approach to understanding the capacity for life to adapt to an increasingly urbanized world.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1540-9295 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2073  
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Author Russo, D., Ancillotto, L., Cistrone, L., Libralato, N., Domer, A., Cohen, S., Korine, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of artificial illumination on drinking bats: a field test in forest and desert habitats Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume In press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Bats show pronounced and often‐adverse reactions to artificial illumination at night (ALAN) when commuting, roosting or foraging. ALAN also affects bat drinking activity, at least when lighting occurs over short intervals. We tested whether continuous illumination of drinking sites over 4‐h periods would lead bats to tolerate ALAN and resume drinking in the course of the night. We conducted our experiments in forest (Italy) and desert (Israel) sites to test whether in the latter habitat, where water is scarce, a greater motivation to drink might lead to less adverse bat reactions. We recorded 6853 drinking buzzes and 1647 feeding buzzes from 17 species and one species group. In the forest sites, species that hunt in open spaces or along forest edges showed little (P. pipistrellus and H. savii) or no (P. kuhlii and N. leisleri) drinking activity decrease, while those associated with forest interiors (Barbastella barbastellus, Plecotus auritus and bats in the genus Myotis) exhibited a strong negative response. In the desert sites, all studied species reduced drinking activity, yet in the desert populations of P. kuhlii we recorded stronger adverse reactions only far from human settlements. The harsh reactions that the desert bat species showed towards ALAN rule out any effect of a greater motivation to drink. Illumination had no effect on foraging by most species, except in the forest sites, where Pipistrellus kuhlii and Nyctalus leisleri increased foraging when the light was on, and in the desert sites, where Hypsugo bodenheimeri decreased foraging in such situations. The progressive human encroachment that is taking place in many world regions on both forests and especially deserts, where few sites for drinking are available, may jeopardize bat populations also through increased exposure to ALAN.  
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  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2075  
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Author Foth, M., Caldwell, G.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title More-than-human media architecture Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Architecture; Lighting; Planning  
  Abstract We consider some of the planetary conditions and global circumstances that both research and practice of media architecture are embedded within, such as climate change, pollution, resource consumption, and loss of biodiversity. While there has been a notable increase in emphasis on participation and engagement in design and use, with the aim to increase the involvement of diverse and often marginalised citizens, a human-centred approach to media architecture comes with its own set of problems. In this paper, we want to draw the attention of the media architecture community to the fallacy of human exceptionalism and anthropocentrism. We present a critical review of examples of media architecture projects and installations that question our understanding of urban space as separate from nature, and designed primarily for humans and just humans. Informed by studies in disciplines such as science and technology studies, critical geography, urban planning, and interaction design, we use insights derived from our review to discuss ways towards a more-than-human approach to media architecture. We conclude by proposing for discussion nascent design considerations for media architecture to go beyond the needs of just humans and to consider new ways to appreciate and cater for our broader ecological entanglements with plants, animals, and the environment at large.  
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  Area Expedition Conference Media Architecture Biennale, 13-16 November 2018, Beijing, China  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2081  
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