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Author Kelsey, E.C.; Felis, J.J.; Czapanskiy, M.; Pereksta, D.M.; Adams, J.
Title Collision and displacement vulnerability to offshore wind energy infrastructure among marine birds of the Pacific Outer Continental Shelf Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage
Volume 227 Issue Pages 229-247
Keywords Animals
Abstract Marine birds are vulnerable to collision with and displacement by offshore wind energy infrastructure (OWEI). Here we present the first assessment of marine bird vulnerability to potential OWEI in the California Current System portion of the U.S. Pacific Outer Continental Shelf (POCS). Using population size, demography, life history, flight heights, and avoidance behavior for 62 seabird and 19 marine water bird species that occur in the POCS, we present and apply equations to calculate Population Vulnerability, Collision Vulnerability, and Displacement Vulnerability to OWEI for each species. Species with greatest Population vulnerability included those listed as species of concern (e.g., Least Tern [Sternula antillarum], Marbled Murrelet [Brachyramphus marmoratus], Pink-footed Shearwater [Puffinus creatopus]) and resident year-round species with small population sizes (e.g., Ashy Storm-Petrel [Oceanodroma homochroa], Brandt's Cormorant [Phalacrocorax penicillatus], and Brown Pelican [Pelecanus occidentalis]). Species groups with the greatest Collision Vulnerability included jaegers/skuas, pelicans, terns and gulls that spend significant amounts of time flying at rotor sweep zone height and don't show macro-avoidance behavior (avoidance of entire OWEI area). Species groups with the greatest Displacement Vulnerability show high macro-avoidance behavior and low habitat flexibility and included loons, grebes, sea ducks, and alcids. Using at-sea survey data from the southern POCS, we combined species-specific vulnerabilities described above with at-sea species densities to assess vulnerabilities spatially. Spatial vulnerability densities were greatest in areas with high species densities (e.g., near-shore areas) and locations where species with high vulnerability were found in abundance. Our vulnerability assessment helps understand and minimize potential impacts of OWEI infrastructure on marine birds in the POCS and could inform management decisions.
Address U.S. Geological Survey Western Ecological Research Center, Santa Cruz, CA 95062, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30195148 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2122
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Author Christie, S.; Vincent, A.D.; Li, H.; Frisby, C.L.; Kentish, S.J.; O'Rielly, R.; Wittert, G.A.; Page, A.J.
Title A rotating light cycle promotes weight gain and hepatic lipid storage in mice Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Physiology. Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Processes involved in regulation of energy balance and intermediary metabolism are aligned to the light-dark cycle. Shift-work and high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity disrupt circadian rhythmicity and are associated with increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This study aimed to determine the effect of simulating shift work on hepatic lipid accumulation in lean and HFD-mice. C57BL/6 mice fed a standard laboratory diet (SLD) or HFD for 4wks were further allocated to a normal light (NL)-cycle (lights on:0600-1800hr) or rotating light (RL)-cycle (3-days NL and 4-days reversed (lights on:1800-0600hr) repeated) for 8wks. Tissue was collected every 3hrs beginning at 0600hr. HFD-mice gained more weight than SLD-mice, and RL-mice gained more weight than NL-mice. SLD-NL and HFD-NL mice, but not RL-mice, were more active, had higher respiratory quotients and consumed/expended more energy during the dark phase compared to the light phase. Blood glucose and plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were elevated in HFD and SLD-RL compared to SLD-NL mice. Hepatic glycogen was elevated in HFD compared to SLD-mice. Hepatic triglycerides were elevated in SLD-RL and HFD-mice compared to SLD-NL. Circadian rhythmicity of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACACA) mRNA was phase shifted in SLD-RL and HFD-NL and lost in HFD-RL mice. Hepatic ACACA protein was reduced in SLD-RL and HFD-mice compared to SLD-NL mice. Hepatic adipose triglyceride lipase was elevated in HFD-NL compared to SLD-NL but lower in RL-mice compared to NL-mice irrespective of diet. -Conclusion: A RL-cycle model of shift-work promotes weight gain and hepatic lipid storage even in lean conditions.
Address Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0193-1857 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30188750 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2123
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Author Almaida-Pagan, P.F.; Ortega-Sabater, C.; Lucas-Sanchez, A.; Martinez-Nicolas, A.; Espinosa, C.; Esteban, M.A.; Madrid, J.A.; Rol, M.; Mendiola, P.; de Costa, J.
Title Impact of a shift work-like lighting schedule on the functioning of the circadian system in the short-lived fish Nothobranchius furzeri Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Experimental Gerontology Abbreviated Journal Exp Gerontol
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals
Abstract Adult Nothobranchius furzeri of the MZM-04/10 strain were individually kept and subjected to a “5+2” shifting lighting schedule (SHIFT) for 8weeks in order to evaluate the desynchronizing effects of a simulated human-like shift-work schedule on the functioning of the circadian system (CS). With this aim, sixteen 21-week-old N. furzeri were placed into a Morning, Night and Evening schedule (lights on from 08:00 to 16:00, 00:00 to 08:00 and 16:00 to 00:00h, respectively) and fed once a day in the middle of the corresponding photophase (12:00, 04:00 and 20:00h, respectively). Then, in the weekends (2days), fish were always returned to the Morning shift. As controls, 16 fish were maintained under a non-shifting LD cycle condition (CONTROL) throughout the whole experiment, with lights on from 08:00 to 16:00h. Rest-activity rhythm (RAR) of fish subjected to SHIFT showed several symptoms of chronodisruption, such as a decrease in the percentage of diurnal activity and a reduction of the relative amplitude and the circadian function index with time. When a periodogram analysis was performed, RAR of N. furzeri under SHIFT conditions showed up to three separate circadian components: one longer than 24h (26.5h) that followed the weekly 8h delays; a short-period component (~23h) that was related to the weekend's phase advances, and finally, a 24h component. The shifting LD schedule also affected fish CS at a molecular level, with several significant differences in the expression of core genes of the molecular clock (bmal1, clock, roralpha, rev-erbalpha) between SHIFT and CONTROL animals. RAR impairment along with changes in clock gene expression could be associated with high stress and accelerated aging in these fish.
Address Chronobiology Lab, Department of Physiology, College of Biology, University of Murcia, Mare Nostrum Campus, IUIE, IMIB-Arrixaca, Spain; Ciber Fragilidad y Envejecimiento Saludable (CIBERFES), Madrid, Spain
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0531-5565 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30184464 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1999
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Author Mard, J.; Di Baldassarre, G.; Mazzoleni, M.
Title Nighttime light data reveal how flood protection shapes human proximity to rivers Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Science Advances Abbreviated Journal Sci Adv
Volume 4 Issue 8 Pages eaar5779
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract To understand the spatiotemporal changes of flood risk, we need to determine the way in which humans adapt and respond to flood events. One adaptation option consists of resettling away from flood-prone areas to prevent or reduce future losses. We use satellite nighttime light data to discern the relationship between long-term changes in human proximity to rivers and the occurrence of catastrophic flood events. Moreover, we explore how these relationships are influenced by different levels of structural flood protection. We found that societies with low protection levels tend to resettle further away from the river after damaging flood events. Conversely, societies with high protection levels show no significant changes in human proximity to rivers. Instead, such societies continue to rely heavily on structural measures, reinforcing flood protection and quickly resettling in flood-prone areas after a flooding event. Our work reveals interesting aspects of human adaptation to flood risk and offers key insights for comparing different risk reduction strategies. In addition, this study provides a framework that can be used to further investigate human response to floods, which is relevant as urbanization of floodplains continues and puts more people and economic assets at risk.
Address IHE Delft Institute for Water Education, 2611 AX Delft, Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30140738; PMCID:PMC6105301 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1989
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Author Gonzalez, M.M.C.
Title Dim Light at Night and Constant Darkness: Two Frequently Used Lighting Conditions That Jeopardize the Health and Well-being of Laboratory Rodents Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol
Volume 9 Issue Pages 609
Keywords Animals; Review
Abstract The influence of light on mammalian physiology and behavior is due to the entrainment of circadian rhythms complemented with a direct modulation of light that would be unlikely an outcome of circadian system. In mammals, physiological and behavioral circadian rhythms are regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. This central control allows organisms to predict and anticipate environmental change, as well as to coordinate different rhythmic modalities within an individual. In adult mammals, direct retinal projections to the SCN are responsible for resetting and synchronizing physiological and behavioral rhythms to the light-dark (LD) cycle. Apart from its circadian effects, light also has direct effects on certain biological functions in such a way that the participation of the SCN would not be fundamental for this network. The objective of this review is to increase awareness, within the scientific community and commercial providers, of the fact that laboratory rodents can experience a number of adverse health and welfare outcomes attributed to commonly-used lighting conditions in animal facilities during routine husbandry and scientific procedures, widely considered as “environmentally friendly.” There is increasing evidence that exposure to dim light at night, as well as chronic constant darkness, challenges mammalian physiology and behavior resulting in disrupted circadian rhythms, neural death, a depressive-behavioral phenotype, cognitive impairment, and the deregulation of metabolic, physiological, and synaptic plasticity in both the short and long terms. The normal development and good health of laboratory rodents requires cyclical light entrainment, adapted to the solar cycle of day and night, with null light at night and safe illuminating qualities during the day. We therefore recommend increased awareness of the limited information available with regards to lighting conditions, and therefore that lighting protocols must be taken into consideration when designing experiments and duly highlighted in scientific papers. This practice will help to ensure the welfare of laboratory animals and increase the likelihood of producing reliable and reproducible results.
Address Seccion Cronobiologia y Sueno, Instituto Ferrero de Neurologia y Sueno, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1664-2295 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30116218; PMCID:PMC6084421 Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2084
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