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Author Park, C.Y.
Title Night Light Pollution and Ocular Fatigue Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Korean Medical Science Abbreviated Journal J Korean Med Sci
Volume 33 Issue 38 Pages e257
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract
Address Department of Ophthalmology, Dongguk University, Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1011-8934 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30220898; PMCID:PMC6137033 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2011
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Author McGlashan, E.M.; Nandam, L.S.; Vidafar, P.; Mansfield, D.R.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Cain, S.W.
Title The SSRI citalopram increases the sensitivity of the human circadian system to light in an acute dose Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Psychopharmacology Abbreviated Journal Psychopharmacology (Berl)
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Human Health
Abstract RATIONALE: Disturbances of the circadian system are common in depression. Though they typically subside when depression is treated with antidepressants, the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Despite being the most commonly prescribed class of antidepressants, the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on the human circadian clock is not well understood. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of the SSRI citalopram (30 mg) on the sensitivity of the human circadian system to light. METHODS: This study used a double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects, crossover design. Participants completed two melatonin suppression assessments in room level light (~ 100 lx), taking either a single dose of citalopram 30 mg or a placebo at the beginning of each light exposure. Melatonin suppression was calculated by comparing placebo and citalopram light exposure conditions to a dim light baseline. RESULTS: A 47% increase in melatonin suppression was observed after administration of an acute dose of citalopram, with all participants showing more suppression after citalopram administration (large effect, d = 1.54). Further, melatonin onset occurred later under normal room light with citalopram compared to placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Increased sensitivity of the circadian system to light could assist in explaining some of the inter-individual variability in antidepressant treatment responses, as it is likely to assist in recovery in some patients, while causing further disruption for others.
Address Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, 18 Innovation Walk, Clayton, VIC, 3800, Australia. sean.cain@monash.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0033-3158 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30219986 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2012
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Author Taufique, S.K.T.; Prabhat, A.; Kumar, V.
Title Illuminated night alters hippocampal gene expressions and induces depressive-like responses in diurnal corvids Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial light at night induces circadian disruptions and causes cognitive impairment and mood disorders; yet very little is known about the neural and molecular correlates of these effects in diurnal animals. We manipulated the night environment and examined cellular and molecular changes in hippocampus, the brain region involved in cognition and mood, of Indian house crows (Corvus splendens) exposed to 12 h light (150 lux): 12 h darkness (0 lux). Diurnal corvids are an ideal model species with cognitive abilities at par with mammals. Dim light (6 lux) at night (dLAN) altered daily activity:rest pattern, reduced sleep and induced depressive-like responses (decreased eating and self-grooming, self-mutilation and reduced novel object exploration); return to an absolute dark night reversed these negative effects. dLAN suppressed nocturnal melatonin levels, however, diurnal corticosterone levels were unaffected. Concomitant reduction of immunoreactivity for DCX and BDNF suggested dLAN-induced suppression of hippocampal neurogenesis and compromised neuronal health. dLAN also negatively influenced hippocampal expression of genes associated with depressive-like responses (bdnf, il-1beta, tnfr1, nr4a2), but not of those associated with neuronal plasticity (egr1, creb, syngap, syn2, grin2a, grin2b), cellular oxidative stress (gst, sod3, cat1) and neuronal death (caspase2, caspase3, foxo3). Furthermore, we envisaged the role of BDNF and showed epigenetic modification of bdnf gene by decreased histone H3 acetylation and increased hdac4 expression under dLAN. These results demonstrate transcriptional and epigenetic bases of dLAN-induced negative effects in diurnal crows, and provide insights into the risks of exposure to illuminated nights to animals including humans in an urban setting. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address IndoUS Center for Biological Timing Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, Delhi, 110 007, India
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30218624 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2010
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Author Stern, M.; Broja, M.; Sansone, R.; Grone, M.; Skene, S.S.; Liebmann, J.; Suschek, C.V.; Born, M.; Kelm, M.; Heiss, C.
Title Blue light exposure decreases systolic blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and improves endothelial function in humans Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication European Journal of Preventive Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Prev Cardiol
Volume 25 Issue 17 Pages 1875-1883
Keywords Human Health; Blue light; blood pressure; endothelial function; forearm blood flow; pulse wave velocity
Abstract AIMS: Previous studies have shown that ultraviolet light can lead to the release of nitric oxide from the skin and decrease blood pressure. In contrast to visible light the local application of ultraviolet light bears a cancerogenic risk. Here, we investigated whether whole body exposure to visible blue light can also decrease blood pressure and increase endothelial function in healthy subjects. METHODS: In a randomised crossover study, 14 healthy male subjects were exposed on 2 days to monochromatic blue light or blue light with a filter foil (control light) over 30 minutes. We measured blood pressure (primary endpoint), heart rate, forearm vascular resistance, forearm blood flow, endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation), pulse wave velocity and plasma nitric oxide species, nitrite and nitroso compounds (secondary endpoints) during and up to 2 hours after exposure. RESULTS: Blue light exposure significantly decreased systolic blood pressure and increased heart rate as compared to control. In parallel, blue light significantly increased forearm blood flow, flow-mediated dilation, circulating nitric oxide species and nitroso compounds while it decreased forearm vascular resistance and pulse wave velocity. CONCLUSION: Whole body irradiation with visible blue light at real world doses improves blood pressure, endothelial function and arterial stiffness by nitric oxide released from photolabile intracutanous nitric oxide metabolites into circulating blood.
Address Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Stag Hill, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK. Email: c.heiss(at)
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2047-4873 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30196723 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2157
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Author Kelsey, E.C.; Felis, J.J.; Czapanskiy, M.; Pereksta, D.M.; Adams, J.
Title Collision and displacement vulnerability to offshore wind energy infrastructure among marine birds of the Pacific Outer Continental Shelf Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage
Volume 227 Issue Pages 229-247
Keywords Animals
Abstract Marine birds are vulnerable to collision with and displacement by offshore wind energy infrastructure (OWEI). Here we present the first assessment of marine bird vulnerability to potential OWEI in the California Current System portion of the U.S. Pacific Outer Continental Shelf (POCS). Using population size, demography, life history, flight heights, and avoidance behavior for 62 seabird and 19 marine water bird species that occur in the POCS, we present and apply equations to calculate Population Vulnerability, Collision Vulnerability, and Displacement Vulnerability to OWEI for each species. Species with greatest Population vulnerability included those listed as species of concern (e.g., Least Tern [Sternula antillarum], Marbled Murrelet [Brachyramphus marmoratus], Pink-footed Shearwater [Puffinus creatopus]) and resident year-round species with small population sizes (e.g., Ashy Storm-Petrel [Oceanodroma homochroa], Brandt's Cormorant [Phalacrocorax penicillatus], and Brown Pelican [Pelecanus occidentalis]). Species groups with the greatest Collision Vulnerability included jaegers/skuas, pelicans, terns and gulls that spend significant amounts of time flying at rotor sweep zone height and don't show macro-avoidance behavior (avoidance of entire OWEI area). Species groups with the greatest Displacement Vulnerability show high macro-avoidance behavior and low habitat flexibility and included loons, grebes, sea ducks, and alcids. Using at-sea survey data from the southern POCS, we combined species-specific vulnerabilities described above with at-sea species densities to assess vulnerabilities spatially. Spatial vulnerability densities were greatest in areas with high species densities (e.g., near-shore areas) and locations where species with high vulnerability were found in abundance. Our vulnerability assessment helps understand and minimize potential impacts of OWEI infrastructure on marine birds in the POCS and could inform management decisions.
Address U.S. Geological Survey Western Ecological Research Center, Santa Cruz, CA 95062, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30195148 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2122
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