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Author Almaida-Pagan, P.F.; Ortega-Sabater, C.; Lucas-Sanchez, A.; Martinez-Nicolas, A.; Espinosa, C.; Esteban, M.A.; Madrid, J.A.; Rol, M.; Mendiola, P.; de Costa, J.
Title Impact of a shift work-like lighting schedule on the functioning of the circadian system in the short-lived fish Nothobranchius furzeri Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Experimental Gerontology Abbreviated Journal Exp Gerontol
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals
Abstract Adult Nothobranchius furzeri of the MZM-04/10 strain were individually kept and subjected to a “5+2” shifting lighting schedule (SHIFT) for 8weeks in order to evaluate the desynchronizing effects of a simulated human-like shift-work schedule on the functioning of the circadian system (CS). With this aim, sixteen 21-week-old N. furzeri were placed into a Morning, Night and Evening schedule (lights on from 08:00 to 16:00, 00:00 to 08:00 and 16:00 to 00:00h, respectively) and fed once a day in the middle of the corresponding photophase (12:00, 04:00 and 20:00h, respectively). Then, in the weekends (2days), fish were always returned to the Morning shift. As controls, 16 fish were maintained under a non-shifting LD cycle condition (CONTROL) throughout the whole experiment, with lights on from 08:00 to 16:00h. Rest-activity rhythm (RAR) of fish subjected to SHIFT showed several symptoms of chronodisruption, such as a decrease in the percentage of diurnal activity and a reduction of the relative amplitude and the circadian function index with time. When a periodogram analysis was performed, RAR of N. furzeri under SHIFT conditions showed up to three separate circadian components: one longer than 24h (26.5h) that followed the weekly 8h delays; a short-period component (~23h) that was related to the weekend's phase advances, and finally, a 24h component. The shifting LD schedule also affected fish CS at a molecular level, with several significant differences in the expression of core genes of the molecular clock (bmal1, clock, roralpha, rev-erbalpha) between SHIFT and CONTROL animals. RAR impairment along with changes in clock gene expression could be associated with high stress and accelerated aging in these fish.
Address Chronobiology Lab, Department of Physiology, College of Biology, University of Murcia, Mare Nostrum Campus, IUIE, IMIB-Arrixaca, Spain; Ciber Fragilidad y Envejecimiento Saludable (CIBERFES), Madrid, Spain
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0531-5565 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30184464 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1999
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Author Mard, J.; Di Baldassarre, G.; Mazzoleni, M.
Title Nighttime light data reveal how flood protection shapes human proximity to rivers Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Science Advances Abbreviated Journal Sci Adv
Volume 4 Issue 8 Pages eaar5779
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract To understand the spatiotemporal changes of flood risk, we need to determine the way in which humans adapt and respond to flood events. One adaptation option consists of resettling away from flood-prone areas to prevent or reduce future losses. We use satellite nighttime light data to discern the relationship between long-term changes in human proximity to rivers and the occurrence of catastrophic flood events. Moreover, we explore how these relationships are influenced by different levels of structural flood protection. We found that societies with low protection levels tend to resettle further away from the river after damaging flood events. Conversely, societies with high protection levels show no significant changes in human proximity to rivers. Instead, such societies continue to rely heavily on structural measures, reinforcing flood protection and quickly resettling in flood-prone areas after a flooding event. Our work reveals interesting aspects of human adaptation to flood risk and offers key insights for comparing different risk reduction strategies. In addition, this study provides a framework that can be used to further investigate human response to floods, which is relevant as urbanization of floodplains continues and puts more people and economic assets at risk.
Address IHE Delft Institute for Water Education, 2611 AX Delft, Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30140738; PMCID:PMC6105301 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1989
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Author Gonzalez, M.M.C.
Title Dim Light at Night and Constant Darkness: Two Frequently Used Lighting Conditions That Jeopardize the Health and Well-being of Laboratory Rodents Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol
Volume 9 Issue Pages 609
Keywords Animals; Review
Abstract The influence of light on mammalian physiology and behavior is due to the entrainment of circadian rhythms complemented with a direct modulation of light that would be unlikely an outcome of circadian system. In mammals, physiological and behavioral circadian rhythms are regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. This central control allows organisms to predict and anticipate environmental change, as well as to coordinate different rhythmic modalities within an individual. In adult mammals, direct retinal projections to the SCN are responsible for resetting and synchronizing physiological and behavioral rhythms to the light-dark (LD) cycle. Apart from its circadian effects, light also has direct effects on certain biological functions in such a way that the participation of the SCN would not be fundamental for this network. The objective of this review is to increase awareness, within the scientific community and commercial providers, of the fact that laboratory rodents can experience a number of adverse health and welfare outcomes attributed to commonly-used lighting conditions in animal facilities during routine husbandry and scientific procedures, widely considered as “environmentally friendly.” There is increasing evidence that exposure to dim light at night, as well as chronic constant darkness, challenges mammalian physiology and behavior resulting in disrupted circadian rhythms, neural death, a depressive-behavioral phenotype, cognitive impairment, and the deregulation of metabolic, physiological, and synaptic plasticity in both the short and long terms. The normal development and good health of laboratory rodents requires cyclical light entrainment, adapted to the solar cycle of day and night, with null light at night and safe illuminating qualities during the day. We therefore recommend increased awareness of the limited information available with regards to lighting conditions, and therefore that lighting protocols must be taken into consideration when designing experiments and duly highlighted in scientific papers. This practice will help to ensure the welfare of laboratory animals and increase the likelihood of producing reliable and reproducible results.
Address Seccion Cronobiologia y Sueno, Instituto Ferrero de Neurologia y Sueno, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1664-2295 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30116218; PMCID:PMC6084421 Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2084
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Author Ostrin, L.A.
Title Ocular and systemic melatonin and the influence of light exposure Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Clinical & Experimental Optometry Abbreviated Journal Clin Exp Optom
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Vision; Review; Human Health
Abstract Melatonin is a neurohormone known to modulate a wide range of circadian functions, including sleep. The synthesis and release of melatonin from the pineal gland is heavily influenced by light stimulation of the retina, particularly through the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. Melatonin is also synthesised within the eye, although to a much lesser extent than in the pineal gland. Melatonin acts directly on ocular structures to mediate a variety of diurnal rhythms and physiological processes within the eye. The interactions between melatonin, the eye, and visual function have been the subject of a considerable body of recent research. This review is intended to provide a broad introduction for eye-care practitioners and researchers to the topic of melatonin and the eye. The first half of the review describes the anatomy and physiology of melatonin production: how visual inputs affect the pineal production of melatonin; how melatonin is involved in a variety of diurnal rhythms within the eye, including photoreceptor disc shedding, neuronal sensitivity, and intraocular pressure control; and melatonin production and physiological roles in retina, ciliary body, lens and cornea. The second half of the review describes clinical implications of light/melatonin interactions. These include light exposure and photoreceptor contributions in melatonin suppression, leading to consideration of how blue blockers, cataract, and light therapy might affect sleep and mood in patients. Additionally, the interactions between melatonin, sleep and refractive error development are discussed. A better understanding of environmental factors that affect melatonin and subsequent effects on physiological processes will allow clinicians to develop treatments and recommend modifiable behaviours to improve sleep, increase daytime alertness, and regulate ocular and systemic processes related to melatonin.
Address University of Houston College of Optometry, Houston, Texas, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0816-4622 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30074278 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1986
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Author Pilz, L.K.; Levandovski, R.; Oliveira, M.A.B.; Hidalgo, M.P.; Roenneberg, T.
Title Sleep and light exposure across different levels of urbanisation in Brazilian communities Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 11389
Keywords Human Health; Sleep
Abstract Quilombos are settlements originally founded by Africans and African descendants (Quilombolas) in remote parts of Brazil to escape slavery. Due to individual histories, Quilombos nowadays exhibit different states of industrialisation, making them ideal for studying the influence of electrification on daily behaviour. In a comparative approach, we aimed to understand whether and how human sleep changes with the introduction of artificial light. We investigated daily rest-activity-rhythms and sleep-patterns in the Quilombolas' by both wrist actimetry and the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire (MCTQ; the results of these two instruments correlated highly). Seven communities (MCTQ: N = 213/actimetry: N = 125) were compared in this study. Light exposure, phase of activity, sleep timing and duration differ across communities with various levels of urbanisation and histories of access to electricity. People living without electricity and those, who acquired it only very recently on average sleep earlier than those in more urbanised communities (mid-sleep about 1 hour earlier); sleep duration tends to be longer. Our results and those of others show that use of electricity and modern lifestyles have changed sleep behaviour. To understand the consequences of these changes for health, further studies are warranted.
Address Visiting Professor at UFRGS/CAPES, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. roenneberg@lmu.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (down) PMID:30061685 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1968
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