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Author Jong, M. de; Eertwegh, L. van den; Beskers, R.E.; Vries, P.P. de; Spoelstra, K.; Visser, M.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Timing of Avian Breeding in an Urbanised World Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Ardea Abbreviated Journal Ardea  
  Volume 106 Issue 1 Pages 31-38  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract A large part of the world is urbanised, and the process of urbanisation is ongoing. This causes dramatic alterations of species' habitat such as increased night light, sound levels and temperature, along with direct disturbance by human activity. We used eight years of citizen science data from ten common bird species breeding in nest boxes throughout The Netherlands to study the relationship between urbanisation and a key life history trait, timing of breeding. We used nightly light levels in the form of sky brightness and light emission as a proxy for urbanisation as the dramatic change of the night-time environment is a prominent effect of urbanisation. We expected birds to lay earlier in areas with more light at night, i.e. in more urbanised areas. We found, however, no relationship between light levels and seasonal timing in the ten species studied. A limitation of our study is that there was only limited data for the areas that were urbanised most (e.g. inside cities). Most nest box study areas are located in areas with a limited level of urbanisation, and hence with relatively low light levels of light at night. The lack of data on breeding birds in more urbanised environments, which is a rapidly expanding habitat for an increasing number of species worldwide, should be the focus of attention and citizen science would be highly suitable to also provide data for such areas.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0373-2266 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1893  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cruz, L.M.; Shillinger, G.L.; Robinson, N.J.; Tomillo, P.S.; Paladino, F.V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of light intensity and wavelength on the in-water orientation of olive ridley turtle hatchlings Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology  
  Volume 505 Issue Pages 52-56  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Light pollution, associated with coastal development, poses a growing threat to sea turtles. Hatchlings are particularly affected during their crawl to the ocean since they exhibit phototaxis and may move towards or be disoriented by artificial lights. Although much is known about how hatchlings respond to artificial light while crawling to the ocean, far less is known about their response after reaching the water. Here, we investigate how hatchling olive ridley turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) held in artificial pools responded to light of different wavelengths (red, 720 nm; yellow, 660 nm and green, 520 nm) and intensities (0.1–3.3 lx, mean 0.87 lx, SD = 0.85, 10.3–45.9 lx, mean 15.75 lx,SD = 7.12; 47.5–84.2 lx; mean 52.02 lx, SD = 9.11; 91.3–140.8 lx, mean 105 lx, SD = 13.24; 150.1–623 lx, mean 172.18 lx, SD = 73.42). When no light or red light below 39 lx was present, hatchlings oriented at a mean angle of 180° from true north and did not orient towards any discernable feature. However, hatchlings swam towards the light at intensities of red light above 39 lx, yellow light above 10 lx and green light above 5 lx. Our findings indicate that sea turtles will swim towards artificial lights even after reaching the water. Thus, we recommend light mitigation efforts should extend beyond nesting beaches and into the associated oceanic habitats.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1894  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Grubisic, M.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Manfrin, A.; Monaghan, M.T.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A transition to white LED increases ecological impacts of nocturnal illumination on aquatic primary producers in a lowland agricultural drainage ditch Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution  
  Volume 240 Issue Pages 630-638  
  Keywords Plants; Ecology  
  Abstract The increasing use of artificial light at night (ALAN) has led to exposure of freshwater ecosystems to light pollution worldwide. Simultaneously, the spectral composition of nocturnal illumination is changing, following the current shift in outdoor lighting technologies from traditional light sources to light emitting diodes (LED). LEDs emit broad-spectrum white light, with a significant amount of photosynthetically active radiation, and typically a high content of blue light that regulates circadian rhythms in many organisms. While effects of the shift to LED have been investigated in nocturnal animals, its impact on primary producers is unknown. We performed three field experiments in a lowland agricultural drainage ditch to assess the impacts of a transition from high-pressure sodium (HPS) to white LED illumination (color temperature 4000 K) on primary producers in periphyton. In all experiments, we compared biomass and pigment composition of periphyton grown under a natural light regime to that of periphyton exposed to nocturnal HPS or, consecutively, LED light of intensities commonly found in urban waters (approximately 20 lux). Periphyton was collected in time series (1–13 weeks). We found no effect of HPS light on periphyton biomass; however, following a shift to LED the biomass decreased up to 62%. Neither light source had a substantial effect on pigment composition. The contrasting effects of the two light sources on biomass may be explained by differences in their spectral composition, and in particular the blue content. Our results suggest that spectral composition of the light source plays a role in determining the impacts of ALAN on periphyton and that the ongoing transition to LED may increase the ecological impacts of artificial lighting on aquatic primary producers. Reduced biomass in the base of the food web can impact ecosystem functions such as productivity and food supply for higher trophic levels in nocturnally-lit ecosystems.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1900  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Meier; J.M. openurl 
  Title Temporal Profiles of Urban Lighting: Proposal for a research design and first results from three sites in Berlin Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 20 Issue Pages 11-28  
  Keywords Instrumentation; Lighting; Society  
  Abstract This paper presents and experimentally applies a research design for studying the temporal dimension of outdoor artificial illumination in complex lightscapes such as those of urban centres. It contributes to filling the gap between analyses of high-resolution aerial imagery, which provide detailed but static information on the spatial composition of lightscapes, and existing methods for studying their dynamics, which measure changes at high levels of aggregation. The research design adopts a small-scale, detailed approach by using close-range time-lapse videos to document the on/off patterns of individual light sources as the night progresses. It provides a framework and vocabulary for discrete and comparative analyses of the identified temporal profiles of lighting. This allows for pinpointing similarities and differences among the dynamics of different places, nights or categories of lighting. Its application to three case studies in Berlin indicate that switch-on and switch-off times are clustered, resulting in static and dynamic phases of the night. Midnight is a temporal fault-line, after which full illumination ends as portions of the illumination are extinguished. Switch-off times and -rates differ among the three lightscapes and, especially, among four functional types of lighting that were differentiated: infrastructural and commercial units largely remain on all night, while substantial portions of architectural and indoor lighting are switched off, though at fairly different times. Such findings are valuable for studies based on data collected at specific points in time (aerial imagery, measurements), for informing and monitoring temporally oriented lighting policies, and for understanding urban dynamics at large.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1901  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Flowers, N.D.; Gibson, D.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Quantified effects of artificial versus natural nighttime lighting on the Eurasian grassesBothriochloa bladhii(Poaceae) andBothriochloa ischaemum(Poaceae) and the North American grassesPanicum virgatum(Poaceae) andSorghastrum nutans(Poaceae) Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society Abbreviated Journal The Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society  
  Volume 145 Issue 2 Pages 147-155  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Artificial nighttime lighting (light pollution) is increasing worldwide and may have undocumented consequences. In this study, we asked if artificial nighttime lighting affects the performance in monoculture of four grass species: the Eurasian Bothriochloa bladhii (Retz.) S.T. Blake (Poaceae), and Bothriochloa ischaemum (L.) Keng (Poaceae); and the North American Panicum virgatum (L.) (Poaceae), and Sorghastrum nutans (L.) Nash (Poaceae). We conducted a field pot experiment to test for the effects of artificial nighttime lighting and plant density on height, biomass, and leaf number. Height of the tallest individual per population was affected by separate interactions between species and density, light, and time. Final total biomass per individual biomass was increased under nighttime lighting, but more so at low density. Leaf number was increased by artificial nighttime lighting irrespective of species. These results suggest that artificial nighttime lighting may have previously undocumented influences on plant height, biomass, and leaf number within certain species. These findings warrant more in-depth studies into the role that artificial nighttime lighting can have on various plant species.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1095-5674 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1902  
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