toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Malik, N.; Raj, A.; Dhasmana, R.; Bahadur, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of Late Night Studying and Excessive Use of Video Display Terminals on the Ocular Health of Medical Undergraduate Students in A Tertiary Care Hospital Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (down) Journal of Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology Abbreviated Journal J Clin Exp Ophthalmol  
  Volume 09 Issue 06 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the effect of late night study and excessive use of smart phones on the ocular health of medical undergraduate students.

Design: An observational and cross-sectional study.

Participants: Two hundred and fifty nine normal and healthy M.B.B.S students of age 18-25 y were included in the study over a period of two months.

Methods: All the volunteers underwent an interview in form of a questionnaire. A complete ophthalmic examination was done including snellen visual acuity assessment, anterior segment examination with slit lamp, posterior segment with direct or indirect ophthalmoscopy; Schirmer’s test and tear film break up time.

Results: A total of 259 subjects were included in the study and maximum subjects 160 (61.8%) were females. According to age, the students were divided in two groups as I and II with age of 17-20 y and 21-23 y respectively. Maximum 195 (75.3%) students belonged to group I. Maximum subjects 245 (94.5%) were using only smartphones and 239 (92.27%) subjects were using smartphones for more than 2 y. The maximum 136 (52.51%) students studied at night with maximum using tube light 112 (43.24%). A significant association was seen between the digital device used and age of the subject (p value=0.01). Number of symptoms experienced by the students showed significant relationship with the number of hours of smartphone usage (p value=0.02). Source of light in which the students studied at night was significantly associated with the number of symptoms experienced (p value=0.03). An association between usage of smartphones (hours) showed significant relationship with slit lamp examination (tear debri) and Schirmer’s (less than 15 mm) with p value of 0.03, 0.05 respectively.

Conclusion: Source of light used to study at night and number of hours of use of devices shows relationship with symptoms. Smart phone users showed computer-related eye problems in more than half of the subjects.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2155-9570 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2197  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mortazavi, S.A.R., Parhoodeh, S., Hosseini, M.A., Arabi, H., Malakooti, H., Nematollahi, S., Mortazavi, G., Darvish, L., Mortazavi, S.M.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Blocking Short-Wavelength Component of the Visible Light Emitted by Smartphones’ Screens Improves Human Sleep Quality Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (down) Journal of Biomedical Physics and Engineering Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 8 Issue 4 Pages 375-380  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Background: It has been shown that short-wavelength blue component of the visible light spectrum can alter the circadian rhythm and suppress the level of melatonin hormone. The short-wavelength light emitted by smartphones’ screens can affect the sleep quality of the people who use these devices at night through suppression of melatonin.

Objectives: In this study, we examined the effects of covering the screens of smartphones with different filters (changing the effective wavelength of the light) on sleep delay time in 43 healthy students.

Materials and Methods: Volunteer students were asked to go to bed at 23:00 and to use their mobile phones in bed for watching a natural life documentary movie for 60 minutes. No filter was used for one night while amber and blue filters were used for other 2 nights. Photospectrometry method was used to determine the output spectrum of the light passing through the filters used for covering the screens of the mobile phones. The order for utilizing amber or blue filters or using no filter was selected randomly. After 1 hour, the participants were asked to record their sleep delay time measured by a modified form of sleep time record sheet.

Results: The mean sleep delay time for the “no-filter” night was 20.84±9.15 minutes, while the sleep delay times for the nights with amber and blue filters were 15.26±1.04 and 26.33±1.59 minutes, respectively.

Conclusion: The findings obtained in this study support this hypothesis that blue light possibly suppresses the secretion of melatonin more than the longer wavelengths of the visible light spectrum. Using amber filter in this study significantly improved the sleep quality. Altogether, these findings lead us to this conclusion that blocking the short-wavelength component of the light emitted by smartphones’ screens improves human sleep.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2077  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mason, I.C.; Boubekri, M.; Figueiro, M.G.; Hasler, B.P.; Hattar, S.; Hill, S.M.; Nelson, R.J.; Sharkey, K.M.; Wright, K.P.; Boyd, W.A.; Brown, M.K.; Laposky, A.D.; Twery, M.J.; Zee, P.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian Health and Light: A Report on the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Workshop Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (down) Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms  
  Volume 33 Issue 5 Pages 451-457  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Despite the omnipresence of artificial and natural light exposure, there exists little guidance in the United States and elsewhere on light exposure in terms of timing, intensity, spectrum, and other light characteristics known to affect human health, performance, and well-being; in parallel, there is little information regarding the quantity and characteristics of light exposure that people receive. To address this, the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research, in the Division of Lung Diseases, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, held a workshop in August 2016 on circadian health and light. Workshop participants discussed scientific research advances on the effects of light on human physiology, identified remaining knowledge gaps in these research areas, and articulated opportunities to use appropriate lighting to protect and improve circadian-dependent health. Based on this workshop, participants put forth the following strategic intent, objectives, and strategies to guide discovery, measurement, education, and implementation of the appropriate use of light to achieve, promote, and maintain circadian health in modern society.  
  Address Center for Circadian and Sleep Medicine, Department of Neurology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30033850 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1975  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Souman, J.L.; Borra, T.; de Goijer, I.; Schlangen, L.J.M.; Vlaskamp, B.N.S.; Lucassen, M.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spectral Tuning of White Light Allows for Strong Reduction in Melatonin Suppression without Changing Illumination Level or Color Temperature Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (down) Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 420-431  
  Keywords Human Health; Lighting  
  Abstract Studies with monochromatic light stimuli have shown that the action spectrum for melatonin suppression exhibits its highest sensitivity at short wavelengths, around 460 to 480 nm. Other studies have demonstrated that filtering out the short wavelengths from white light reduces melatonin suppression. However, this filtering of short wavelengths was generally confounded with reduced light intensity and/or changes in color temperature. Moreover, it changed the appearance from white light to yellow/orange, rendering it unusable for many practical applications. Here, we show that selectively tuning a polychromatic white light spectrum, compensating for the reduction in spectral power between 450 and 500 nm by enhancing power at even shorter wavelengths, can produce greatly different effects on melatonin production, without changes in illuminance or color temperature. On different evenings, 15 participants were exposed to 3 h of white light with either low or high power between 450 and 500 nm, and the effects on salivary melatonin levels and alertness were compared with those during a dim light baseline. Exposure to the spectrum with low power between 450 and 500 nm, but high power at even shorter wavelengths, did not suppress melatonin compared with dim light, despite a large difference in illuminance (175 vs. <5 lux). In contrast, exposure to the spectrum with high power between 450 and 500 nm (also 175 lux) resulted in almost 50% melatonin suppression. For alertness, no significant differences between the 3 conditions were observed. These results open up new opportunities for lighting applications that allow for the use of electrical lighting without disturbance of melatonin production.  
  Address Philips Lighting Research, Department Lighting Applications, Eindhoven, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29984614 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1985  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Flores, D.E.F.L.; Oda, G.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Novel Light/Dark Regimens with Minimum Light Promote Circadian Disruption: Simulations with a Model Oscillator Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (down) Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial lab manipulation of LD cycles has enabled simulations of the disruptive conditions found in modern human societies, such as jet-lag, night-work and light at night. New techniques using animal models have been developed, and these can greatly improve our understanding of circadian disruption. Some of these techniques, such as in vivo bioluminescence assays, require minimum external light. This requirement is challenging because the usual lighting protocols applied in circadian desynchronization experiments rely on considerable light input. Here, we present a novel LD regimen that can disrupt circadian rhythms with little light per day, based on computer simulations of a model limit-cycle oscillator. The model predicts that a single light pulse per day has the potential to disturb rhythmicity when pulse times are randomly distributed within an interval. Counterintuitively, the rhythm still preserves an underlying 24-h periodicity when this interval is as large as 14 h, indicating that day/night cues are still detectable. Only when pulses are spread throughout the whole 24-h day does the rhythm lose any day-to-day period correlation. In addition, the model also reveals that stronger pulses of brighter light should exacerbate the disrupting effects. We propose the use of this LD schedule-which would be compatible with the requirements of in vivo bioluminescence assays-to help understand circadian disruption and associated illnesses.  
  Address Instituto de Biociencias, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30595077 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2146  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: