|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Malik, N.; Raj, A.; Dhasmana, R.; Bahadur, H.
Title Effect of Late Night Studying and Excessive Use of Video Display Terminals on the Ocular Health of Medical Undergraduate Students in A Tertiary Care Hospital Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Journal of Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology Abbreviated Journal J Clin Exp Ophthalmol
Volume 09 Issue 06 Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the effect of late night study and excessive use of smart phones on the ocular health of medical undergraduate students.

Design: An observational and cross-sectional study.

Participants: Two hundred and fifty nine normal and healthy M.B.B.S students of age 18-25 y were included in the study over a period of two months.

Methods: All the volunteers underwent an interview in form of a questionnaire. A complete ophthalmic examination was done including snellen visual acuity assessment, anterior segment examination with slit lamp, posterior segment with direct or indirect ophthalmoscopy; Schirmer’s test and tear film break up time.

Results: A total of 259 subjects were included in the study and maximum subjects 160 (61.8%) were females. According to age, the students were divided in two groups as I and II with age of 17-20 y and 21-23 y respectively. Maximum 195 (75.3%) students belonged to group I. Maximum subjects 245 (94.5%) were using only smartphones and 239 (92.27%) subjects were using smartphones for more than 2 y. The maximum 136 (52.51%) students studied at night with maximum using tube light 112 (43.24%). A significant association was seen between the digital device used and age of the subject (p value=0.01). Number of symptoms experienced by the students showed significant relationship with the number of hours of smartphone usage (p value=0.02). Source of light in which the students studied at night was significantly associated with the number of symptoms experienced (p value=0.03). An association between usage of smartphones (hours) showed significant relationship with slit lamp examination (tear debri) and Schirmer’s (less than 15 mm) with p value of 0.03, 0.05 respectively.

Conclusion: Source of light used to study at night and number of hours of use of devices shows relationship with symptoms. Smart phone users showed computer-related eye problems in more than half of the subjects.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2155-9570 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2197
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yates, J.
Title Perspective: The Long-Term Effects of Light Exposure on Establishment of Newborn Circadian Rhythm Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Jcsm
Volume 14 Issue 10 Pages 1829-1830
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract Development of newborns continues postnatally. Evidence has accumulated on the early life programming effects of light exposure on the maturing visual axis and the developing circadian rhythm. Consideration of the effects of light at night and insufficient light during the day should occur when giving anticipatory guidance in the care of newborn infants. Long-term health consequences of light imprinting may occur with inappropriate light-dark environments during the newborn period.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1550-9389 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2032
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Min, J.-young; Min, K.-bok
Title Outdoor Artificial Nighttime Light and Use of Hypnotic Medications in Older Adults: A Population-Based Cohort Study Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Jcsm
Volume 14 Issue 11 Pages 1903-1910
Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing
Abstract Study Objectives

Outdoor artificial nighttime light is increasingly recognized as a form of environmental pollution. Excessive nighttime light exposure, whether from indoor or outdoor sources, has been associated with a number of deleterious effects on human health. We performed a population-based cohort study in South Korea to assess the possible association between outdoor nocturnal lighting and insomnia in older adults, as measured by prescriptions for hypnotic drugs.

Methods

This study used data from the 2002–2013 National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort (NHIS-NSC), and a total of 52,027 adults who were age 60 years or older were included in the study. Light data were based on satellite mapping of artificial light. The usage data of two hypnotic drugs, zolpidem (N05CF02) and triazolam (N05CD05), were extracted from the NHIS-NSC records.

Results

Of the 52,027 patients in this cohort, 11,738 (22%) had prescriptions for hypnotic drugs. Increasing outdoor artificial nighttime light exposure (stratified by quartile) was associated with an increased prevalence of hypnotic prescriptions and daily dose intake. Compared with individuals in the lowest quartile 1, the regression coefficients for prescription days and daily defined doses of all hypnotic drugs and certain hypotonic drugs were significantly higher among those living in areas with higher outdoor artificial nighttime light (quartiles 2 through 4).

Conclusions

Outdoor artificial nighttime light exposure was significantly associated with prescription of hypnotic drugs in older adults. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that outdoor artificial nighttime light may cause sleep disturbances.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1550-9389 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2060
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Amavilah, V.H.
Title Artificial nighttime lights and the “real” well-being of nations : “Measuring economic growth from outer space” and welfare from right here on Earth Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Journal of Economics and Political Economy Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 209-218
Keywords Economics; Remote Sensing
Abstract GDP remains too much of an imprecise measure of the standard of living. There

is a need for either substitutes or complements. Nighttime lights are a reasonable indicator of the extent, scale, and intensity of socio-economic activities, but a poor measure of national welfare. However, if nighttime lights are understood to constitute externalities, then their effects can be used to adjust measured growth for welfare. From that angle, nighttime lights appear to exert sub-optimal positive externalities in developing countries, and supra-optimal negative externality in developed countries. This means that even if we assume equal growth rates in developing and developed countries, welfare is enhanced by increasing nighttime lights in developing countries and reduced by increasing nighttime lights in developed countries.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2099
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jones, B.A.
Title Spillover health effects of energy efficiency investments: Quasi-experimental evidence from the Los Angeles LED streetlight program Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Journal of Environmental Economics and Management Abbreviated Journal Journal of Environmental Economics and Management
Volume 88 Issue Pages 283-299
Keywords Human Health; LED; public health; outdoor lighting; Los Angeles; economics; energy efficiency; breast cancer; fossil fuel carbon emissions
Abstract Payback estimates of energy efficiency investments often ignore public health externalities. This is problematic in cases where spillover health effects are substantial, such as when the application of new technology alters environmental exposures. When health externalities are included in return on investment calculations, energy efficiency programs may look more or less attractive than suggested by conventional “energy savings only” estimates. This analysis exploits the quasi-experiment provided by the 2009 Los Angeles (LA) LED streetlight efficiency program to investigate the returns on investments inclusive of an originally estimated health externality. Using the synthetic control method, we find that the LED streetlight program is associated with a lagged increase in breast cancer mortality of 0.479 per 100,000. Inclusive of the effects of LEDs on breast cancer and avoided carbon emissions, the LA LED program provides a −146.2% 10-year return compared to +118.2% when health outcomes and carbon emissions are ignored.
Address Department of Economics, University of New Mexico, 1 UNM Drive, MSC 05 3060, Albuquerque, NM, 87131, USA; bajones(at)unm.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0095-0696 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1976
Permanent link to this record