toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Miller, S.D.; Straka III, W.C.; Yue, J.; Seaman, C.J.; Xu, S.; Elvidge, C.D.; Hoffmann, L.; Azeem, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Dark Side of Hurricane Matthew: Unique Perspectives from the VIIRS Day/Night Band Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.  
  Volume 99 Issue 12 Pages 2561-2574  
  Keywords remote sensing  
  Abstract Hurricane Matthew (28 Sep – 9 October 2016) was perhaps the most infamous storm of the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season, claiming over 600 lives and causing over $15 billion USD in damages across the central Caribbean and southeastern U.S. seaboard. Research surrounding Matthew and its many noteworthy meteorological characteristics (e.g., rapid intensification into the southernmost Category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic basin on record, strong lightning and sprite production, and unusual cloud morphology) is ongoing. Satellite remote sensing typically plays an important role in the forecasting and study of hurricanes, providing a top-down perspective on storms developing over the remote and inherently data sparse tropical oceans. In this regard, a relative newcomer among the suite of satellite observations useful for tropical cyclone monitoring and research is the Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB), a sensor flying onboard the NOAA/NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite. Unlike conventional instruments, the DNB's sensitivity to extremely low levels of visible/near-infrared light offers new insight on storm properties and impacts. Here, we chronicle Matthew’s path of destruction and peer through the DNB’s looking glass of low-light visible observations, including lightning connected to sprite formation, modulation of the atmospheric nightglow by storm-generated gravity waves, and widespread power outages. Collected without moonlight, these examples showcase the wealth of unique information present in DNB nocturnal low-light observations without moonlight, and their potential to complement traditional satellite measurements of tropical storms worldwide.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-0007 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1959  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Patel, J.S.; Radetsky, L.; Rea, M.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Value of Red Light at Night for Increasing Basil Yield Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Canadian Journal of Plant Science Abbreviated Journal Can. J. Plant Sci.  
  Volume 98 Issue 6 Pages 1321-1330  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Sweet basil (<i>Ocimum basilicum L.</i>) is primarily used for culinary purposes, but it is also used in the fragrance and medicinal industries. In the last few years, global sweet basil production has been significantly impacted by downy mildew caused by <i>Peronospora belbahrii</i>. Nighttime exposure to red light has been shown to inhibit sporulation of <i>P. belbahrii</i>. The objective of this study was to determine if nighttime exposure to red light from light-emitting diodes (LEDs; λ<sub>max</sub> = 625 nm) could increase plant growth (plant height and leaf size) and yield (number and weight of leaves) in basil plants. In two sets of greenhouse experiments, red light was applied at a photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of 60 µmol m<sup>-2</sup> s<sup>-1</sup> during the otherwise dark night for 10 hours (from 20:00 to 06:00). The results demonstrate that exposure to red light at night can increase the number of basil leaves per plant, plant height, leaf size (length and width), and leaf fresh and dry weight, compared to plants in darkness at night. The addition of incremental red light at night has the potential to be cost-effective for fresh organic basil production in controlled environments.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0008-4220 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1955  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zubidat, A.E.; Fares, B.; Fares, F.; Haim, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Light at Night of Different Spectral Compositions Differentially Affects Tumor Growth in Mice: Interaction With Melatonin and Epigenetic Pathways Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Cancer Control : Journal of the Moffitt Cancer Center Abbreviated Journal Cancer Control  
  Volume 25 Issue 1 Pages 1073274818812908  
  Keywords Human Health; 6-Smt; Cfl; EE-halogen; GDM-levels; body mass; carbon; corticosterone; cosinor analysis; light at night; yellow-LED  
  Abstract Lighting technology is rapidly advancing toward shorter wavelength illuminations that offer energy-efficient properties. Along with this advantage, the increased use of such illuminations also poses some health challenges, particularly breast cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the effects of artificial light at night (ALAN) of 4 different spectral compositions (500-595 nm) at 350 Lux on melatonin suppression by measuring its urine metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, global DNA methylation, tumor growth, metastases formation, and urinary corticosterone levels in 4T1 breast cancer cell-inoculated female BALB/c mice. The results revealed an inverse dose-dependent relationship between wavelength and melatonin suppression. Short wavelength increased tumor growth, promoted lung metastases formation, and advanced DNA hypomethylation, while long wavelength lessened these effects. Melatonin treatment counteracted these effects and resulted in reduced cancer burden. The wavelength suppression threshold for melatonin-induced tumor growth was 500 nm. These results suggest that short wavelength increases cancer burden by inducing aberrant DNA methylation mediated by the suppression of melatonin. Additionally, melatonin suppression and global DNA methylation are suggested as promising biomarkers for early diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer. Finally, ALAN may manifest other physiological responses such as stress responses that may challenge the survival fitness of the animal under natural environments.  
  Address 1 The Israeli Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Chronobiology, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1073-2748 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30477310; PMCID:PMC6259078 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2143  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mascovich, K. A., Larson, L. R., & Andrews, K. M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lights On, or Lights Off? Hotel Guests' Response to Nonpersonal Educational Outreach Designed to Protect Nesting Sea Turtles Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Chelonian Conservation and Biology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 206-215  
  Keywords Education; Psychology  
  Abstract Light pollution from beachfront hotels has the potential to impact nesting and hatching sea turtles. Education strategies could be used to alter visitor behavior and mitigate this threat. We tested the efficacy of a sea turtle–friendly education card that encouraged visitors to “protect the night, hide the light.” Cards were placed in beachfront hotel rooms at a prominent sea turtle nesting site: Jekyll Island, Georgia. We assessed visitor responses by conducting nightly observations to determine the proportion of occupied guest rooms with beach-visible lights under 2 different scenarios (cards present or cards absent). We found that less than half of all hotel guests closed room blinds to minimize artificial light on the nesting beach, and compliance rates seemed to be lower during peak visitation times. The nonpersonal educational treatment (card) had little effect on visitors' sea turtle–friendly lighting choices and behaviors, highlighting the need for other approaches to encourage responsible tourist behavior at ecologically sensitive beach destinations.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2316  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Madahi, P.-G.; Ivan, O.; Adriana, B.; Diana, O.; Carolina, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Constant light during lactation programs circadian and metabolic systems Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 35 Issue 8 Pages 1153-1167  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Exposure to light at night is a disruptive condition for the adult circadian system, leading to arrhythmicity in nocturnal rodents. Circadian disruption is a risk factor for developing physiological and behavioral alterations, including weight gain and metabolic disease. During early stages of development, the circadian system undergoes a critical period of adjustment, and it is especially vulnerable to altered lighting conditions that may program its function, leading to long-term effects. We hypothesized that during lactation a disrupted light-dark cycle due to light at night may disrupt the circadian system and in the long term induce metabolic disorders. Here we explored in pups, short- and long-term effects of constant light (LL) during lactation. In the short term, LL caused a loss of rhythmicity and a reduction in the immunopositive cells of VIP, AVP, and PER1 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In the short term, the affection on the circadian clock in the pups resulted in body weight gain, loss of daily rhythms in general activity, plasma glucose and triglycerides (TG). Importantly, the DD conditions during development also induced altered daily rhythms in general activity and in the SCN. Exposure to LD conditions after lactation did not restore rhythmicity in the SCN, and the number of immunopositve cells to VIP, AVP, and PER1 remained reduced. In the long term, daily rhythmicity in general activity was restored; however, daily rhythms in glucose and TG remained disrupted, and daily mean levels of TG were significantly increased. Present results point out the programming role played by the LD cycle during early development in the function of the circadian system and on metabolism. This study points out the risk represented by exposure to an altered light-dark cycle during early stages of development. ABBREVIATIONS: AVP: arginine vasopressin peptide; CRY: cryptochrome; DD: constant darkness; DM: dorsomedial; LD: light-dark cycle; LL: constant light; NICUs: neonatal intensive care units; P: postnatal days; PER: period; S.E.M.: standard error of the mean; SCN: suprachiasmatic nucleus; TG: triglycerides; VIP: vasointestinal peptide; VL: ventrolateral; ZT: zeitgeber time.  
  Address a Facultad de Medicina , Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM , Mexico City , Mexico  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29688088 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1884  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: