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Author Martinez, L. R.
Title How Much Should We Trust the Dictator's GDP Estimates? Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal SSRN
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Economics; Remote Sensing
Abstract I study the manipulation of GDP statistics in weak and non-democracies. I show that the elasticity of official GDP figures to nighttime lights is systematically larger in more authoritarian regimes. This autocracy gradient in the night-lights elasticity of GDP cannot be explained by differences in a wide range of factors that may affect the mapping of night lights to GDP, such as economic structure, statistical capacity, rates of urbanization or electrification. The gradient is larger when there is a stronger incentive to exaggerate economic performance (years of low growth, before elections or after becoming ineligible for foreign aid) and is only present for GDP sub-components that rely on government information and have low third-party verification. The results indicate that yearly GDP growth rates are inflated by a factor of between 1.15 and 1.3 in the most authoritarian regimes. Correcting for manipulation substantially changes our understanding of comparative economic performance at the turn of the XXI century.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1926
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Author Bergs, R.; Issa, M.
Title What do night satellite images and small-scale grid data tell us about functional changes in the rural-urban environment and the economy? Case studies Frankfurt-Rhein/Main and Ljubljana Urban Region Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract This study addresses how nocturnal satellite imagery can be used in spatial analysis of rural-urban relations. It shows how a novel approach can be used to complement the prevalent traditional survey methods below the data resolution level of official regional statistics. The overarching aim is to contribute with a novel database and different empirical tools to broaden spatial information for decision-making in policy and planning at small spatial scale amongst municipalities. The accuracy of spatial information is expected to be substantially enhanced, paving ways for better rural-urban planning coordination and synergies.
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Corporate Author PRAC - Bergs & Issa Partnership Co. , Im Hopfengarten 19b, D - 65812 Bad Soden, Germany Thesis
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2047
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Author Foth, M., Caldwell, G.A.
Title More-than-human media architecture Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Architecture; Lighting; Planning
Abstract We consider some of the planetary conditions and global circumstances that both research and practice of media architecture are embedded within, such as climate change, pollution, resource consumption, and loss of biodiversity. While there has been a notable increase in emphasis on participation and engagement in design and use, with the aim to increase the involvement of diverse and often marginalised citizens, a human-centred approach to media architecture comes with its own set of problems. In this paper, we want to draw the attention of the media architecture community to the fallacy of human exceptionalism and anthropocentrism. We present a critical review of examples of media architecture projects and installations that question our understanding of urban space as separate from nature, and designed primarily for humans and just humans. Informed by studies in disciplines such as science and technology studies, critical geography, urban planning, and interaction design, we use insights derived from our review to discuss ways towards a more-than-human approach to media architecture. We conclude by proposing for discussion nascent design considerations for media architecture to go beyond the needs of just humans and to consider new ways to appreciate and cater for our broader ecological entanglements with plants, animals, and the environment at large.
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Area Expedition Conference Media Architecture Biennale, 13-16 November 2018, Beijing, China
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2081
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Author Bará, S., Ulla, A.
Title Light Pollution in the Galician Atlantic Islands Maritime-Terrestrial National Park 2018 Report Type Report
Year 2018 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Conservation; Spain; Galicia; Europe; national park
Abstract The Galician Atlantic Islands Maritime-Terrestrial National Park (PNMTIAG), with the exception of the island of Cortegada, still has night skies of acceptable quality. However, the PNMTIAG islands are under strong photic pressures, both internal and external, that hinder the preservation of the basic features of the natural night, and call for an immediate action of all concerned stakeholders
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher USC Tragsa Place of Publication Editor
Language Galician Summary Language Galician Original Title
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2187
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Author Wallace, H. D.
Title Electric Lighting Policy in the Federal Government, 1880-2016 Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords History; Policy; Lighting
Abstract Federal policies have targeted electric lighting since the 1880s with varying success. This dissertation examines the history of those policies to understand policy makers’ intent and how their decisions affected the course of events. This qualitative study poses three research questions: How have changes in lamp efficacy affected policy development? How and why have federal policies targeted electric lighting? How have private sector actors adapted public policy to further their own goals? The analysis uses an interdisciplinary approach taking advantage of overlapping methodologies drawn from policy and political sciences, economics, and the history of technology. The concepts of path dependency, context, and actor networks are especially important. Adoption of electric lighting spurred the construction of complex and capital intensive infrastructures now considered indispensable, and lighting always consumed a significant fraction of US electric power. Engineers and scientists created many lamps over the decades, in part to meet a growing demand for energy efficient products. Invention and diffusion of those lamps occurred amid changing standards and definitions of efficiency, shifting relations between network actors, and the development of path dependencies that constrained efforts to affect change. Federal actors typically used lighting policy to conserve resources, promote national security, or to symbolically emphasize the onset of a national crisis. The study shows that after an initial introductory phase, lighting-specific policies developed during two distinct periods. The earlier period consisted of intermittent, crisis-driven federal interventions of mixed success. The later period featured a sustained engagement between public and private sectors wherein incremental adjustments achieved policy goals. A time of transition occurred between the two main periods during which technical, economic, and political contexts changed, while several core social values remained constant. In both early and later periods, private sector actors used policy opportunities to further commercial goals, a practice that public sector actors in the later period used to promote policy acceptance. Recently enacted energy standards removing ordinary incandescent lamps in favor of high efficiency lamps mark the end of the later period. Apparent success means that policy makers should reconsider how they use lighting to achieve future goals.
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Corporate Author Thesis Ph.D. thesis
Publisher University of Maryland Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2210
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