|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Mulvin, D.
Title Media Prophylaxis: Night Modes and the Politics of Preventing Harm Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Information & Culture Abbreviated Journal Information & Culture
Volume 53 Issue 2 Pages 175-202
Keywords History; Lighting; Society
Abstract This article develops the term “media prophylaxis” to analyze the ways technologies are applied to challenges of calibrating one’s body with its environment and as defenses against endemic, human-made harms. In recent years, self-illuminated screens (like those of computers, phones, and tablets) have been identified by scientists, journalists, and concerned individuals as particularly pernicious sources of sleep-disrupting light. By tracing the history of circadian research, the effects of light on sleep patterns, and the recent appearance of software like “f.lux,” Apple’s “Night Shift,” and “Twilight,” this article shows how media-prophylactic technologies can individualize responsibility for preventing harm while simultaneously surfacing otherwise ignored forms of chronic suffering.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2164-8034 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1917
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Eccard, J.A.; Scheffler, I.; Franke, S.; Hoffmann, J.; Leather, S.; Stewart, A.
Title Off-grid: solar powered LED illumination impacts epigeal arthropods Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Insect Conservation and Diversity Abbreviated Journal Insect Conserv Divers
Volume 11 Issue 6 Pages 600-607
Keywords Animals; Ecology
Abstract Advances in LED technology combined with solar, storable energy bring light to places remote from electricity grids. Worldwide more than 1.3 billion of people are living off‐grid, often in developing regions of high insect biodiversity. In developed countries, dark refuges for wildlife are threatened by ornamental garden lights. Solar powered LEDs (SPLEDs) are cheaply available, dim, and often used to illuminate foot paths, but little is known on their effects on ground living (epigeal) arthropods.

We used off‐the‐shelf garden lamps with a single ‘white’ LED (colour temperature 7250 K) to experimentally investigate effects on attraction and nocturnal activity of ground beetles (Carabidae).

We found two disparate and species‐specific effects of SPLEDs. (i) Some nocturnal, phototactic species were not reducing activity under illumination and were strongly attracted to lamps (>20‐fold increase in captures compared to dark controls). Such species aggregate in lit areas and SPLEDs may become ecological traps, while the species is drawn from nearby, unlit assemblages. (ii) Other nocturnal species were reducing mobility and activity under illumination without being attracted to light, which may cause fitness reduction in lit areas.

Both reactions offer mechanistic explanations on how outdoor illumination can change population densities of specific predatory arthropods, which may have cascading effects on epigeal arthropod assemblages. The technology may thus increase the area of artificial light at night (ALAN) impacting insect biodiversity.

Measures are needed to mitigate effects, such as adjustment of light colour temperature and automated switch‐offs.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1752458X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2085
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Grenis, K.; Murphy, S.M.
Title Direct and indirect effects of light pollution on the performance of an herbivorous insect Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Insect Science Abbreviated Journal Insect Sci
Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages 770-776
Keywords Animals; Plants
Abstract Light pollution is a global disturbance with resounding impacts on a wide variety of organisms, but our understanding of these impacts is restricted to relatively few higher vertebrate species. We tested the direct effects of light pollution on herbivore performance as well as indirect effects mediated by host plant quality. We found that artificial light from streetlights alters plant toughness. Additionally, we found evidence of both direct and indirect effects of light pollution on the performance of an herbivorous insect, which indicates that streetlights can have cascading impacts on multiple trophic levels. Our novel findings suggest that light pollution can alter plant-insect interactions and thus may have important community-wide consequences.
Address Department of Biological Sciences, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1672-9609 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29425403 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1865
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kernbach, M.E.; Hall, R.J.; Burkett-Cadena, N.; Unnasch, T.R.; Martin, L.B.
Title Dim light at night: physiological effects and ecological consequences for infectious disease Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Integrative and Comparative Biology Abbreviated Journal Integr Comp Biol
Volume 58 Issue 5 Pages 995-1007
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light pollution has emerged as a pervasive component of land development over the past century. Several detrimental impacts of this anthropogenic influence have been identified in night shift workers, laboratory rodents, and a plethora of wildlife species. Circadian, or daily, patterns are interrupted by the presence of light at night and have the capacity to alter rhythmic physiological or behavioral characteristics. Indeed, biorhythm disruption can lead to metabolic, reproductive, and immunological dysfunction depending on the intensity, timing, duration and wavelength of light exposure. Light pollution, in many forms and by many pathways, is thus apt to affect the nature of host-pathogen interactions. However, no research has yet investigated this possibility. The goal of this manuscript is to outline how dim light at night (dLAN), a relevant and common form of light pollution, may affect disease dynamics by interrupting circadian rhythms and regulation of immune responses as well as opportunities for host-parasite interactions and subsequent transmission risk including spillover into humans. We close by proposing some promising interventions including alternative lighting methods or vector control efforts.
Address Department of Global Health, University of South Florida, Tampa FL
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1540-7063 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29939262 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1946
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tarquini, R.; Carbone, A.; Martinez, M.; Mazzoccoli, G.
Title Daylight saving time and circadian rhythms in the neuro-endocrine-immune system: impact on cardiovascular health Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Internal and Emergency Medicine Abbreviated Journal Intern Emerg Med
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract
Address Division of Internal Medicine and Laboratory of Chronobiology, Department of Medical Sciences, Fondazione IRCCS “Casa Sollievo Della Sofferenza”, Cappuccini Avenue, San Giovanni Rotondo, Foggia, 71013, Italy. g.mazzoccoli@operapadrepio.it
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1828-0447 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30488154 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2121
Permanent link to this record