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Author Donners, M.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Groenendijk, D.; van Langevelde, F.; Bikker, J.W.; Longcore, T.; Veenendaal, E.
Title Colors of attraction: Modeling insect flight to light behavior Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 434-440
Keywords Animals; ecology; Lighting
Abstract Light sources attract nocturnal flying insects, but some lamps attract more insects than others. The relation between the properties of a light source and the number of attracted insects is, however, poorly understood. We developed a model to quantify the attractiveness of light sources based on the spectral output. This model is fitted using data from field experiments that compare a large number of different light sources. We validated this model using two additional datasets, one for all insects and one excluding the numerous Diptera. Our model facilitates the development and application of light sources that attract fewer insects without the need for extensive field tests and it can be used to correct for spectral composition when formulating hypotheses on the ecological impact of artificial light. In addition, we present a tool allowing the conversion of the spectral output of light sources to their relative insect attraction based on this model.
Address Plant Ecology and Nature Conservation, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29944198 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1944
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Author Zheng, Q.; Weng, Q.; Huang, L.; Wang, K.; Deng, J.; Jiang, R.; Ye, Z.; Gan, M.
Title A new source of multi-spectral high spatial resolution night-time light imagery—JL1-3B Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 215 Issue Pages 300-312
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) provides a unique footprint of human activities and settlements. However, the adverse effects of ALAN on human health and ecosystems have not been well understood. Because of a lack of high resolution data, studies of ALAN in China have been confined to coarse resolution, and fine-scale details are missing. The fine details of ALAN are pertinent, because the highly dense population in Chinese cities has created a distinctive urban lighting pattern. In this paper, we introduced a new generation of high spatial resolution and multi-spectral night-time light imagery from the satellite JL1-3B. We examined its effectiveness for monitoring the spatial pattern and discriminating the types of artificial light based on a case study of Hangzhou, China. Specifically, local Moran's I analysis was applied to identify artificial light hotspots. Then, we analyzed the relationship between artificial light brightness and land uses at the parcel-level, which were generated from GF-2 imagery and open social datasets. Third, a machine learning based method was proposed to discriminate the type of lighting sources – between high pressure sodium lamps (HPS) and light-emitting diode lamps (LED) – by incorporating their spectral information and morphology feature. The result shows a complicated heterogeneity of illumination characteristics across different land uses, where main roads, commercial and institutional areas were brightly lit while residential area, industrial area and agricultural land were dark at night. It further shows that the proposed method was effective at separating light emitted by HPS and LED, with an overall accuracy and kappa coefficient of 83.86% and 0.67, respectively. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of JL1-3B and its superiority over previous night-time light data in detecting details of lighting objects and the nightscape pattern, and suggests that JL1-3B and alike could open up new opportunities for the advancement of night-time remote sensing.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1945
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Author Kernbach, M.E.; Hall, R.J.; Burkett-Cadena, N.; Unnasch, T.R.; Martin, L.B.
Title Dim light at night: physiological effects and ecological consequences for infectious disease Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Integrative and Comparative Biology Abbreviated Journal Integr Comp Biol
Volume 58 Issue 5 Pages 995-1007
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light pollution has emerged as a pervasive component of land development over the past century. Several detrimental impacts of this anthropogenic influence have been identified in night shift workers, laboratory rodents, and a plethora of wildlife species. Circadian, or daily, patterns are interrupted by the presence of light at night and have the capacity to alter rhythmic physiological or behavioral characteristics. Indeed, biorhythm disruption can lead to metabolic, reproductive, and immunological dysfunction depending on the intensity, timing, duration and wavelength of light exposure. Light pollution, in many forms and by many pathways, is thus apt to affect the nature of host-pathogen interactions. However, no research has yet investigated this possibility. The goal of this manuscript is to outline how dim light at night (dLAN), a relevant and common form of light pollution, may affect disease dynamics by interrupting circadian rhythms and regulation of immune responses as well as opportunities for host-parasite interactions and subsequent transmission risk including spillover into humans. We close by proposing some promising interventions including alternative lighting methods or vector control efforts.
Address Department of Global Health, University of South Florida, Tampa FL
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1540-7063 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29939262 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1946
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Author Hansen, M.J.; Cocherell, D.E.; Cooke, S.J.; Patrick, P.H.; Sills, M.; Fangue, N.A.
Title Behavioural guidance of Chinook salmon smolts: the variable effects of LED spectral wavelength and strobing frequency Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Conservation Physiology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Exploiting species-specific behavioural responses of fish to light is an increasingly promising technique to reduce the entrainment or impingement of fish that results from the diversion of water for human activities, such as hydropower or irrigation. Whilst there is some evidence that white light can be an effective deterrent for Chinook salmon smolts, the results have been mixed. There is a need to test the response of fish to different spectra and strobing frequencies to improve deterrent performance. We tested the movement and spatial response of groups of four fish to combinations of light-emitting diode (LED) spectra (red, green, blue and white light) during the day and night, and strobing frequencies (constant and 2Hz) during the day, using innovative LED technology intended as a behavioural guidance device for use in the field. Whilst strobing did not alter fish behaviour when compared to constant light, the red light had a repulsive effect during the day, with fish under this treatment spending significantly less time in the half of the arena closest to the behavioural guidance device compared to both the control and blue light. Importantly, this effect disappeared at night, where there were no differences in movement and space use found between spectra. There was some evidence of a potential attractive response of fish to the blue and green light during the day. Under these light treatments, fish spent the highest amount of time closest to the behavioural guidance device. Further tests manipulating the light intensity in the different spectra are needed to verify the mechanistic determinants of the observed behaviours. Results are discussed in reference to the known spectral sensitivities of the cone and rod photopigments in these fish, and further experiments are suggested to better relate the work to mitigating the effects on fish of infrastructure used for hydropower and irrigation.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2051-1434 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1947
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Author Al Zahrani, M.H.; Omar, A.I.; Abdoon, A.M.O.; Ibrahim, A.A.; Alhogail, A.; Elmubarak, M.; Elamin, Y.E.; AlHelal, M.A.; Alshahrani, A.M.; Abdelgader, T.M.; Saeed, I.; El Gamri, T.B.; Alattas, M.S.; Dahlan, A.A.; Assiri, A.M.; Maina, J.; Li, X.H.; Snow, R.W.
Title Cross-border movement, economic development and malaria elimination in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication BMC Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Med
Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 98
Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health
Abstract Malaria at international borders presents particular challenges with regards to elimination. International borders share common malaria ecologies, yet neighboring countries are often at different stages of the control-to-elimination pathway. Herein, we present a case study on malaria, and its control, at the border between Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Malaria program activity reports, case data, and ancillary information have been assembled from national health information systems, archives, and other related sources. Information was analyzed as a semi-quantitative time series, between 2000 and 2017, to provide a plausibility framework to understand the possible contributions of factors related to control activities, conflict, economic development, migration, and climate. The malaria recession in the Yemeni border regions of Saudi Arabia is a likely consequence of multiple, coincidental factors, including scaled elimination activities, cross-border vector control, periods of low rainfall, and economic development. The temporal alignment of many of these factors suggests that economic development may have changed the receptivity to the extent that it mitigated against surges in vulnerability posed by imported malaria from its endemic neighbor Yemen. In many border areas of the world, malaria is likely to be sustained through a complex congruence of factors, including poverty, conflict, and migration.
Address Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. rsnow@kemri-wellcome.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1741-7015 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29940950 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1948
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