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Author Wu, W.; Zhao, H.; Jiang, S.
Title A Zipf's Law-Based Method for Mapping Urban Areas Using NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light Data Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 130
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract A significant difficulty in urban studies is obtaining urban areas. Nighttime light (NTL) data provide efficient approaches to map urban areas. Previous methods have utilized visual particularities of cities with ancillary data to obtain the optimal thresholds. How cities behave differently from rural areas should be considered. A Zipf’s law-based method is proposed to bootstrap the optimal threshold based on the statistical properties of a Zipf’s law model on continuous thresholds at the country scale. In our method, the Zipf’s law model is utilized to quantify fractal, self-organized, and agglomeration behaviors of cities. The three-phase cluster dynamics are discovered and the abrupt transition between Phase 1 and Phase 2 denotes the rural-urban demarcation point. The urban areas are derived by the proposed method from the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS) NTL data in 2013 in China. An accuracy assessment is conducted to compare it with the GlobeLand30-2010 data and the overall accuracy has directly confirmed the effectiveness of the method. The validation using point of interest (POI) data verifies that the urban areas show strong responses to social interactions and production with R2 values of 0.91 and 0.92, respectively, implying that the city areas extracted by our method can be a proxy for human activities. Comparisons with existing methods validate the effectiveness and high degree of automation of the proposed method in mapping urban areas at the country level. According to our analyses, the Zipf’s law-based method shows great potential to provide a universal criterion to map urban areas from the perspective of the behaviors of urban systems without ancillary data, and a valuable tool for spatial and temporal urban studies.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1797
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Author Nagare, R.; Plitnick, B.; Figueiro, M.
Title Does the iPad Night Shift mode reduce melatonin suppression? Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume 51 Issue 3 Pages 373-383
Keywords Human Health
Abstract The increased use of self-luminous displays, especially in the evening prior to bedtime, has been associated with melatonin suppression, delayed sleep and sleep curtailment. The present study set out to investigate whether the Night Shift application provided by Apple Inc. for use on its portable electronic devices is effective for reducing acute melatonin suppression, a well-established marker of circadian phase. Participants experienced four experimental conditions: a dim light control, a high circadian stimulus true positive intervention and two Night Shift interventions delivering low and high correlated colour temperature light from the devices. Melatonin suppression did not significantly differ between the two Night Shift interventions, which indicates that changing the spectral composition of self-luminous displays without changing their brightness settings may be insufficient for preventing impacts on melatonin suppression.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @; GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1798
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Author Foster, J.J.; Smolka, J.; Nilsson, D.-E.; Dacke, M.
Title How animals follow the stars Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci
Volume 285 Issue 1871 Pages
Keywords Vision; Animals
Abstract Throughout history, the stars have provided humans with ever more information about our world, enabling increasingly accurate systems of navigation in addition to fuelling some of the greatest scientific controversies. What information animals have evolved to extract from a starry sky and how they do so, is a topic of study that combines the practical and theoretical challenges faced by both astronomers and field biologists. While a number of animal species have been demonstrated to use the stars as a source of directional information, the strategies that these animals use to convert this complex and variable pattern of dim-light points into a reliable 'stellar orientation' cue have been more difficult to ascertain. In this review, we assess the stars as a visual stimulus that conveys directional information, and compare the bodies of evidence available for the different stellar orientation strategies proposed to date. In this context, we also introduce new technologies that may aid in the study of stellar orientation, and suggest how field experiments may be used to characterize the mechanisms underlying stellar orientation.
Address Department of Biology, Lund University, Solvegatan 35, Lund 223 62, Sweden
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29367394 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1802
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Author Johns, L.E.; Jones, M.E.; Schoemaker, M.J.; McFadden, E.; Ashworth, A.; Swerdlow, A.J.
Title Domestic light at night and breast cancer risk: a prospective analysis of 105 000 UK women in the Generations Study Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication British Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Br J Cancer
Volume 118 Issue Pages 600-606
Keywords Human Health
Abstract BACKGROUND: Circadian disruption caused by exposure to light at night (LAN) has been proposed as a risk factor for breast cancer and a reason for secular increases in incidence. Studies to date have largely been ecological or case-control in design and findings have been mixed. METHODS: We investigated the relationship between LAN and breast cancer risk in the UK Generations Study. Bedroom light levels and sleeping patterns at age 20 and at study recruitment were obtained by questionnaire. Analyses were conducted on 105 866 participants with no prior history of breast cancer. During an average of 6.1 years of follow-up, 1775 cases of breast cancer were diagnosed. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs), adjusting for potential confounding factors. RESULTS: There was no association between LAN level and breast cancer risk overall (highest compared with lowest LAN level at recruitment: HR=1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88-1.15), or for invasive (HR=0.98, 95% CI: 0.85-1.13) or in situ (HR=0.96, 95% CI: 0.83-1.11) breast cancer, or oestrogen-receptor (ER) positive (HR=0.98, 95% CI: 0.84-1.14); or negative (HR=1.16, 95% CI: 0.82-1.65) tumours separately. The findings did not differ by menopausal status. Adjusting for sleep duration, sleeping at unusual times (non-peak sleep) and history of night work did not affect the results. Night waking with exposure to light, occurring around age 20, was associated with a reduced risk of premenopausal breast cancer (HR for breast cancer overall=0.74, 95% CI: 0.55-0.99; HR for ER-positive breast cancer=0.69, 95% CI: 0.49-0.97). CONCLUSIONS: In this prospective cohort analysis of LAN, there was no evidence that LAN exposure increased the risk of subsequent breast cancer, although the suggestion of a lower breast cancer risk in pre-menopausal women with a history of night waking in their twenties may warrant further investigation.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 23 January 2018; doi:10.1038/bjc.2017.359 www.bjcancer.com.
Address Division of Breast Cancer Research, The Institute of Cancer Research, London SW3 6JB, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0007-0920 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29360812 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1803
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Author Zeng, X.; Shao, X.; Qiu, S.; Ma, L.; Gao, C.; Li, C.
Title Stability Monitoring of the VIIRS Day/Night Band over Dome C with a Lunar Irradiance Model and BRDF Correction Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 189
Keywords Instrumentation; Remote Sensing
Abstract The unique feature of the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) day/night band (DNB) is its ability to take quantitative measurements of low-light scenes at night. In order to monitor the stability of the high gain stage (HGS) of the DNB, nighttime observations over the Dome C site under moonlight are analyzed in this study. The Miller and Turner 2009 (MT2009) lunar irradiance model has been used to simulate lunar illumination over Dome C. However, the MT2009 model does not differentiate the waxing and waning lunar phases. In this paper, the MT-SWC (SeaWiFS Corrected) lunar irradiance model differentiating the waxing and waning lunar phases is derived by correcting the MT2009 model using lunar observations made by the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS). In addition, a top of atmosphere (TOA) bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model during nighttime over Dome C is developed to remove the angular dependence from the nighttime TOA reflectance. The long-term stability monitoring of the DNB high-gain stage (HGS) reveals a lower reflectance factor in 2012 in comparison to the following years, which can be traced back to the change in relative spectral response (RSR) of National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS) VIIRS DNB in April 2013. It also shows the radiometric stability of DNB data, with long-term stability of less than 1.58% over the periods from 2013 to 2016. This method can be used to monitor the radiometric stability of other low-light observing sensors using vicarious calibration sites under moonlight illumination.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1805
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