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Author Hoyos-Díaz, J. M., Villalba-Alemán, E., Ramoni-Perazzi, P., & Muñoz-Romo, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of artificial lighting on capture success in two species of frugivorous bats (chiroptera: phyllostomidae) in an urban locality from the Venezuelan Andes Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Mastozoologia Neotropical Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 25 Issue 2 Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light is becoming a major issue for bats because it affects critical activities such as foraging, reproduction, and communication. We assessed the effect of artificial lighting on Artibeus lituratus and Artibeus jamaicensis in a small secondary growth forest patch near a street subjected to unexpected illumination. Bats were captured in the forest patch using a 12-m long mist net. Results indicated a nearly six-fold, significant decrease in capture success after the street lamps were installed. Artificial light from street lamps functions as a “light barrier” that inhibits bats from conducting short and long-distance movements, which might have detrimental consequences for bats and the plants they disperse. RESUMEN. Impacto de la luz artificial en el éxito de captura de dos especies de murciélagos frugívoros (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) en una localidad urbana de Los Andes venezolanos. La luz artificial se ha convertido en un problema grave para los murciélagos, porque está afectando actividades críticas que incluyen forrajeo, reproducción y comunicación. Evaluamos el efecto de la luz artificial en los murciélagos frugívoros Artibeus lituratus y Artibeus jamaicensis, en un pequeño parche de bosque secundario, cercano a una calle sujeta a una iluminación artificial inesperada. Capturamos a los murciélagos en el bosque secundario, empleando una red de neblina de 12 m de longitud. Los resultados indican que el éxito de captura disminuyó significativamente casi seis veces después de la instalación de los bombillos. La luz artificial de las lámparas funciona como “barreras u obstáculos de luz” que inhiben a los murciélagos de realizar movimientos de corta y larga distancia, lo cual podría tener consecuencias perjudiciales para los murciélagos y las plantas que ellos dispersan.  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2318  
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Author Challéat, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Le socioécosystème environnement nocturne : un objet de recherche interdisciplinaire Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Natures Sciences Sociétés Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 26 Issue 3 Pages 257-269  
  Keywords Commentary; Review  
  Abstract Résumé

Cet article expose le cheminement par lequel nous constituons lʼenvironnement nocturne en objet de recherche interdisciplinaire. Apparue dans les années 1990 suite à la requalification environnementale de lʼéclairage urbain en pollution lumineuse, cette notion floue vise à appréhender les systèmes – humains ou non – fonctionnellement liés à la nuit et à lʼobscurité. En nous appuyant sur lʼobservation des processus de construction, de légitimation et de territorialisation de lʼenvironnement nocturne, nous montrons que cette notion opère une jonction entre différentes acceptions et approches fortement cloisonnées des rôles, fonctions et effets de lʼéclairage artificiel nocturne (ALAN, pour artificial light at night1). Nous proposons dʼaborder son étude suivant le cadre dʼanalyse des socioécosystèmes qui nécessite la mise en interaction des différentes approches de lʼALAN par les sciences de la société et les sciences du vivant.

Abstract

This paper explains the scientific reasoning that led us to institute the “night environment” as new interdisciplinary research topic from a social-ecological perspective. Sociocultural, ecological and health costs of artificial light at night (ALAN) have been gradually highlighted since the second half of the twentieth century in a range of scientific fields, from astronomy to medicine through ecology and energy. At the same time an environmentalist movement was emerging: the “dark-sky movement” which condemns “light pollution” and carries its demands within local, national or international arenas. In the 1990s, the requalification of urban lighting as light pollution gave rise to the ill-defined notion of night environment. This notion aims to understand the systems, both human and non-human, that are functionally related to the night and darkness. Building on medium and long-term observations of the processes of construction, legitimation and territorialization of the nocturnal environment, we demonstrate that this notion enables to establish a junction between the different strongly compartmentalized meanings and approaches of the roles, functions and effects of ALAN, and more specifically of urban lighting. We propose to approach its study based on the social-ecological systems framework. This requires creating strong interactions between the different approaches of ALAN: those of the social sciences and those of the experimental, life and health sciences.
 
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  Language French Summary Language Original Title  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2317  
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Author Mascovich, K. A., Larson, L. R., & Andrews, K. M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lights On, or Lights Off? Hotel Guests' Response to Nonpersonal Educational Outreach Designed to Protect Nesting Sea Turtles Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Chelonian Conservation and Biology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 206-215  
  Keywords Education; Psychology  
  Abstract Light pollution from beachfront hotels has the potential to impact nesting and hatching sea turtles. Education strategies could be used to alter visitor behavior and mitigate this threat. We tested the efficacy of a sea turtle–friendly education card that encouraged visitors to “protect the night, hide the light.” Cards were placed in beachfront hotel rooms at a prominent sea turtle nesting site: Jekyll Island, Georgia. We assessed visitor responses by conducting nightly observations to determine the proportion of occupied guest rooms with beach-visible lights under 2 different scenarios (cards present or cards absent). We found that less than half of all hotel guests closed room blinds to minimize artificial light on the nesting beach, and compliance rates seemed to be lower during peak visitation times. The nonpersonal educational treatment (card) had little effect on visitors' sea turtle–friendly lighting choices and behaviors, highlighting the need for other approaches to encourage responsible tourist behavior at ecologically sensitive beach destinations.  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2316  
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Author Windle, A. E., Hooley, D. S., & Johnston, D. W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Robotic Vehicles Enable High-Resolution Light Pollution Sampling of Sea Turtle Nesting Beaches Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 5 Issue 493 Pages  
  Keywords Instrumentation; Animals; Skyglow  
  Abstract Nesting sea turtles appear to avoid brightly lit beaches and often turn back to sea prematurely when exposed to artificial light. Observations and experiments have noted that nesting turtles prefer darker areas where buildings and high dunes act as light barriers. As a result, sea turtles often nest on darker beaches, creating spatial concentrations of nests. Artificial nighttime light, or light pollution, has been quantified using a variety of methods. However, it has proven challenging to make accurate measurements of ambient light at fine scales and on smaller nesting beaches. Additionally, light has traditionally been measured from stationary tripods perpendicular to beach vegetation, disregarding the point of view of a nesting sea turtle. In the present study, nighttime ambient light conditions were assessed on three beaches in central North Carolina: a developed coastline of a barrier island, a nearby State Park on the same barrier island comprised of protected and undeveloped land, and a completely uninhabited wilderness on an adjacent barrier island in the Cape Lookout National Seashore. Using an autonomous terrestrial rover, high resolution light measurements (mag/arcsec2) were collected every minute with two ambient light sensors along transects on each beach. Spatial comparisons between ambient light and nesting density at and between these locations reveal that highest densities of nests occur in regions with lowest light levels, supporting the hypothesis that light pollution from coastal development may influence turtle nesting distribution. These results can be used to support ongoing management strategies to mitigate this pressing conservation issue.  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2315  
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Author Lee, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Do We Use Artificial Light Appropriately? Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Psychiatry Investigation Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 15 Issue 12 Pages  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2314  
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