|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Jiang, W.; He, G.; Long, T.; Guo, H.; Yin, R.; Leng, W.; Liu, H.; Wang, G.
Title (down) Potentiality of Using Luojia 1-01 Nighttime Light Imagery to Investigate Artificial Light Pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Sensors Abbreviated Journal Sensors
Volume 18 Issue 9 Pages 2900
Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract The successful launch of Luojia 1-01 complements the existing nighttime light data with a high spatial resolution of 130 m. This paper is the first study to assess the potential of using Luojia 1-01 nighttime light imagery for investigating artificial light pollution. Eight Luojia 1-01 images were selected to conduct geometric correction. Then, the ability of Luojia 1-01 to detect artificial light pollution was assessed from three aspects, including the comparison between Luojia 1-01 and the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS), the source of artificial light pollution and the patterns of urban light pollution. Moreover, the advantages and limitations of Luojia 1-01 were discussed. The results showed the following: (1) Luojia 1-01 can detect a higher dynamic range and capture the finer spatial details of artificial nighttime light. (2) The averages of the artificial light brightness were different between various land use types. The brightness of the artificial light pollution of airports, streets, and commercial services is high, while dark areas include farmland and rivers. (3) The light pollution patterns of four cities decreased away from the urban core and the total light pollution is highly related to the economic development. Our findings confirm that Luojia 1-01 can be effectively used to investigate artificial light pollution. Some limitations of Luojia 1-01, including its spectral range, radiometric calibration and the effects of clouds and moonlight, should be researched in future studies.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1997
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rybnikova, N.; Portnov, B.A.
Title (down) Population-level study links short-wavelength nighttime illumination with breast cancer incidence in a major metropolitan area Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 35 Issue 9 Pages 1198-1208
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Several population-level studies revealed a positive association between breast cancer (BC) incidence and artificial light at night (ALAN) exposure. However, the effect of short-wavelength illumination, implicated by laboratory research and small-scale cohort studies as the main driving force behind BC-ALAN association, has not been supported by any population-level study carried out to date. We investigated a possible link between BC and ALAN of different subspectra using a multi-spectral year-2011 satellite image, taken from the International Space Station, and superimposing it with year-2013 BC incidence data available for the Great Haifa Metropolitan Area in Israel. The analysis was performed using both ordinary least square (OLS) and spatial dependency models, controlling for socioeconomic and locational attributes of the study area. The study revealed strong associations between BC and blue and green light subspectra (B = 0.336 +/- 0.001 and B = 0.335 +/- 0.002, respectively; p < 0.01), compared to a somewhat weaker effect for the red subspectrum (B = 0.056 +/- 0.001; p < 0.01). However, spatial dependency models, controlling for spatial autocorrelation of regression residuals, confirmed only a positive association between BC incidence and short-wavelength (blue) ALAN subspectrum (z = 2.462, p < 0.05) while reporting insignificant associations between BC and either green (z = 1.425, p > 0.1) or red (z = -0.604, p > 0.1) subspectra. The obtained result is in line with the results of laboratory- and small-scale cohort studies linking short-wavelength nighttime illumination with circadian disruption and melatonin suppression. The detected effect of blue lights on BC incidence may help to develop informed illumination policies aimed at minimizing the adverse health effects of ALAN exposure on human health.
Address a Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management , University of Haifa , Haifa , Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29768068 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1906
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shor, E.; Potavskaya, R.; Kurtz, A.; Paik, I.; Huq, E.; Green, R.
Title (down) PIF-mediated sucrose regulation of the circadian oscillator is light quality and temperature dependent Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Genes Abbreviated Journal Genes (Basel)
Volume 9 Issue 12 Pages
Keywords Plants
Abstract Studies are increasingly showing that metabolic and circadian (~24 h) pathways are strongly interconnected, with the circadian system regulating the metabolic state of the cell, and metabolic products feeding back to entrain the oscillator. In plants, probably the most significant impact of the circadian system on metabolism is in its reciprocal regulation of photosynthesis; however, the pathways by which this occurs are still poorly understood. We have previously shown that members of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF) family are involved in the photosynthate entrainment of the circadian oscillator. In this paper, using Arabidopsis mutants and overexpression lines, we examine how temperature and light quality affect PIF-mediated sucrose signaling to the oscillator and examine the contributions of individual PIF members. Our results also show that the quality of light is important for PIF signaling, with red and blue lights having the opposite effects, and that temperature affects PIF-mediated sucrose signaling. We propose the light sensitivity of PIF-mediated sucrose entrainment of the oscillator may be important in enabling plants to distinguish between sucrose produced de novo from photosynthesis during the day and the sucrose products of starch degradation at the end of the night.
Address Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Institute for Life Sciences, Edmond J. Safra Campus, Givat Ram, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904, Israel. rgreen@mail.huji.ac.il
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2073-4425 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30551669; PMCID:PMC6316277 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2155
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bará, S., Lima, R.C.
Title (down) Photons without borders: quantifying light pollution transfer between territories Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal
Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 51-61
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract The light pollution levels experienced at any given site generally depend on a wide number of artificial light sources distributed throughout the surrounding territory. Since photons can travel long distances before being scattered by the atmosphere, any effective proposal for reducing local light pollution levels needs an accurate assessment of the relative weight of all intervening light sources, including those located tens or even hundreds of km away. In this paper we describe several ways of quantifying and visualizing these relative weights. Particular emphasis is made on the aggregate contribution of the municipalities, which are -in many regions of the world- the administrative bodies primarily responsible for the planning and maintenance of public outdoor lighting systems.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2066
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Farnworth, B.; Innes, J.; Kelly, C.; Littler, R.; Waas, J.R.
Title (down) Photons and foraging: Artificial light at night generates avoidance behaviour in male, but not female, New Zealand weta Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut
Volume 236 Issue Pages 82-90
Keywords Animals
Abstract Avoiding foraging under increased predation risk is a common anti-predator behaviour. Using artificial light to amplify predation risk at ecologically valuable sites has been proposed to deter introduced mice (Mus musculus) and ship rats (Rattus rattus) from degrading biodiversity in island ecosystems. However, light may adversely affect native species; in particular, little is known about invertebrate responses to altered lighting regimes. We investigated how endemic orthopterans responded to artificial light at Maungatautari Ecological Island (Waikato, New Zealand). We predicted that based on their nocturnal behaviour, ecology and evolutionary history, tree weta (Hemideina thoracica) and cave weta (Rhaphidophoridae) would reduce their activity under illumination. Experimental stations (n=15) experienced three evenings under each treatment (order randomised): (a) light (illuminated LED fixture), (b) dark (unilluminated LED fixture) and (c) baseline (no lighting fixture). Weta visitation rates were analysed from images captured on infra-red trail cameras set up at each station. Light significantly reduced the number of observations of cave (71.7% reduction) and tree weta (87.5% reduction). In observations where sex was distinguishable (53% of all visits), male tree weta were observed significantly more often (85% of visits) than females (15% of visits) and while males avoided illuminated sites, no detectable difference was observed across treatments for females. Sex could not be distinguished for cave weta. Our findings have implications for the use of light as a novel pest management strategy, and for the conservation of invertebrate diversity and abundance within natural and urban ecosystems worldwide that may be affected by light pollution.
Address Biological Sciences, School of Science, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton, New Zealand. Electronic address: waasur@waikato.ac.nz
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29414377 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1856
Permanent link to this record