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Author Dimitriadis, C.; Fournari - Konstantinidou, I.; Sourbès, L.; Koutsoubas, D.; Mazaris, A.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Reduction of sea turtle population recruitment caused by nightlight: Evidence from the Mediterranean region Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Ocean & Coastal Management Abbreviated Journal Ocean & Coastal Management  
  Volume 153 Issue Pages 108-115  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The spread of artificial night lighting is increasingly acknowledged as a major threat to global biodiversity. Identifying and exploring the impacts of nightlight pollution upon species behavior, ecology and population dynamics could enhance conservation capacity. Sea turtle hatchlings emerge from nest at night and use visual cues to direct towards the brightest and lowest horizon, eventually leading them to the sea. Nightlight pollution could alter the cues perceived, disorienting the fragile hatchlings. We examined the level of artificial lighting and orientation patterns of sea turtles hatchling, in Zakynthos Island, Greece, one of the main nesting rookeries of the loggerheads (Caretta caretta) in the Mediterranean Sea. We analyzed movement patterns of 5967 hatchlings from 230 nests, and demonstrate that nightlight pollution could reduce population recruitment by more than 7%, suggesting that mitigation measures should become a high conservation priority. Our results further suggest that the responses of sea turtle hatchlings to artificial nighttime lighting could vary significantly depending on various factors, either anthropogenic or natural. Local conditions operating at the nesting site level determine the fine scale responses of hatchlings, thus conservation measures should be drawn in respect to site-specific properties.  
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  ISSN 0964-5691 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1792  
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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Mohar, A.; Pintar, G; Stare, J url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Reducing the environmental footprint of church lighting: matching façade shape and lowering luminance with the EcoSky LED Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 20 Issue 1 Pages 1-10  
  Keywords Energy; Lighting; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The lighting of the Church of the Three Kings in Logatec, Slovenia was replaced in 2014. The power of the installation was reduced 96% from 1.6 kW to 58 W, and spill light from the site was effectively eliminated. As a result, the church is no longer visible in nighttime satellite images of the area, indicating a reduction of waste light from the site of at least a factor of 30. This article discusses the concept of sustainability with regards to cultural heritage lighting, within the context of this example.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1831  
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Author Czaczkes, T.J.; Bastidas-Urrutia, A.M.; Ghislandi, P.; Tuni, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Reduced light avoidance in spiders from populations in light-polluted urban environments Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Die Naturwissenschaften Abbreviated Journal Naturwissenschaften  
  Volume 105 Issue 11-12 Pages 64  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Increased urbanisation is leading to a rise in light pollution. Light pollution can disrupt the behaviour and physiology of animals resulting in increased mortality. However, animals may also benefit from artificial light sources, as these may aggregate prey or signal suitable environments. For example, spiders are commonly seen congregating around artificial light sources. Changes in selective pressures engendered by urban environments are driving changes in urban organisms, driving better adaptation to these environments. Here, we ask whether urban populations of the synanthropic spider Steatoda triangulosa show different responses to light compared to rural populations. Egg-sacs from urban and rural populations were collected and incubated in a common garden setting, and the emerging spiderlings tested for light preference. While rural spiderlings avoided light (37% built webs in the light), urban spiderlings were indifferent to it (49% built webs in the light). Reduced light avoidance may benefit spiders through increased prey capture, increased movement into suitable habitats, or due to a release from selection pressure from visually hunting predators which do not enter buildings.  
  Address Department of Biology, Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich, Grosshaderner Str. 2, 82152, Planegg-Martinsried, Germany  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-1042 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:30377809 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2140  
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Author Leise, T.L.; Goldberg, A.; Michael, J.; Montoya, G.; Solow, S.; Molyneux, P.; Vetrivelan, R.; Harrington, M.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Recurring circadian disruption alters circadian clock sensitivity to resetting Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract A single phase advance of the light:dark (LD) cycle can temporarily disrupt synchrony of neural circadian rhythms within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and between the SCN and peripheral tissues. Compounding this, modern life can involve repeated disruptive light conditions. To model chronic disruption to the circadian system, we exposed male mice to more than a month of a 20 h light cycle (LD10:10), which mice typically cannot entrain to. Control animals were housed under LD12:12. We measured locomotor activity and body temperature rhythms in vivo, and rhythms of PER2::LUC bioluminescence in SCN and peripheral tissues ex vivo. Unexpectedly, we discovered strong effects of the time of dissection on circadian phase of PER2::LUC bioluminescent rhythms, which varied across tissues. White adipose tissue was strongly reset by dissection, while thymus phase appeared independent of dissection timing. Prior light exposure impacted the SCN, resulting in strong resetting of SCN phase by dissection for mice housed under LD10:10, and weak phase shifts by time of dissection in SCN from control LD12:12 mice. These findings suggest that exposure to circadian disruption may desynchronize SCN neurons, increasing network sensitivity to perturbations. We propose that tissues with a weakened circadian network, such as the SCN under disruptive light conditions, or with little to no coupling, e.g., some peripheral tissues, will show increased resetting effects. In particular, exposure to light at inconsistent circadian times on a recurring weekly basis disrupts circadian rhythms and alters sensitivity of the SCN neural pacemaker to dissection time. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Neuroscience Program, Smith College, Northampton, MA, 01063, USA  
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  ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:30269396 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2036  
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Author Stone, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Re-envisioning the Nocturnal Sublime: On the Ethics and Aesthetics of Nighttime Lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Topoi Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume In press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Society  
  Abstract Grounded in the practical problem of light pollution, this paper examines the aesthetic dimensions of urban and natural darkness, and its impact on how we perceive and evaluate nighttime lighting. It is argued that competing notions of the sublime, manifested through artificial illumination and the natural night sky respectively, reinforce a geographical dualism between cities and wilderness. To challenge this spatial differentiation, recent work in urban-focused environmental ethics, as well as environmental aesthetics, are utilized to envision the moral and aesthetic possibilities of a new urban nocturnal sublime. Through articulating the aspirations and constraints of a new urban nocturnal experience, this paper elucidates the axiological dimensions of light pollution, draws attention to nightscapes as a site of importance for urban-focused (environmental) philosophy, and examines the enduring relevance of the sublime for both the design of nighttime illumination and the appreciation of the night sky.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2098  
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