toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Netzel, H.; Netzel, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) High-resolution map of light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume 221 Issue Pages 300-308  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract In 1976 Berry created a very simple model describing artificial night sky brightness due to light emitted by cities. He used several assumptions and simplifications, due to which, map calculated with this model does not properly describes the night sky brightness. Especially, this is the case for highly urbanized areas. We used Berry’s idea, but we changed some assumptions and used very different input data. As in Berry’s approach, we focused on total sky brightness and did not analyze spectral properties of artificial light emission. Resultant map has a resolution of 100 meters, and so far it is the most detailed map of night sky brightness. Moreover we included the shadowing effect, which is very important on mountainous areas. Map is calculated for Poland and for several other places in Europe. We also describe the comparison between calculated values and measurements for different areas in Europe. Also we present comparison between our approach and the new world atlas of artificial night sky brightness.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1937  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Weisbuch, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Historical perspective on the physics of artificial lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Comptes Rendus Physique Abbreviated Journal Comptes Rendus Physique  
  Volume 19 Issue 3 Pages 89-112  
  Keywords History; Lighting  
  Abstract We describe the evolution of lighting technologies used throughout the ages, and how the need for improvements was such that any new technology giving better and cheaper lighting was immediately implemented. Thus, every revolution in energy sources – gas, petrol electricity – was first put to large-scale use in lighting. We describe in some detail several “ancient” techniques of scientific interest, along with their physical limitations. Electroluminescence – the phenomenon by which LEDs directly convert electricity into light – was long thought to only be of use for indicators or flat panel displays supposed to replace the bulky cathode-ray tubes. The more recent uses of LEDs were mainly for street traffic lights, car indicators, small phone displays, followed by backlighting of TV screens. LED lamps for general lighting only emerged recently as the dominant application of LEDs thanks to dramatic decrease in cost, and continuous improvements of color quality and energy conversion efficiency.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1631-0705 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1840  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ouyang, J.Q.; Davies, S.; Dominoni, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Hormonally mediated effects of artificial light at night on behavior and fitness: linking endocrine mechanisms with function Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Experimental Biology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Biol  
  Volume 221 Issue Pt 6 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Alan; Glucocorticoid; Hormones; Light pollution; Melatonin; Metabolism; Sleep; Stress; Thyroid; Urban ecology  
  Abstract Alternation between day and night is a predictable environmental fluctuation that organisms use to time their activities. Since the invention of artificial lighting, this predictability has been disrupted and continues to change in a unidirectional fashion with increasing urbanization. As hormones mediate individual responses to changing environments, endocrine systems might be one of the first systems affected, as well as being the first line of defense to ameliorate any negative health impacts. In this Review, we first highlight how light can influence endocrine function in vertebrates. We then focus on four endocrine axes that might be affected by artificial light at night (ALAN): pineal, reproductive, adrenal and thyroid. Throughout, we highlight key findings, rather than performing an exhaustive review, in order to emphasize knowledge gaps that are hindering progress on proposing impactful and concrete plans to ameliorate the negative effects of ALAN. We discuss these findings with respect to impacts on human and animal health, with a focus on the consequences of anthropogenic modification of the night-time environment for non-human organisms. Lastly, we stress the need for the integration of field and lab experiments as well as the need for long-term integrative eco-physiological studies in the rapidly expanding field of light pollution.  
  Address Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK;  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29545373 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1817  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Czeisler, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Housing Immigrant Children – The Inhumanity of Constant Illumination Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The New England Journal of Medicine Abbreviated Journal N Engl J Med  
  Volume 379 Issue 2 Pages e3  
  Keywords Human Health; Commentary  
  Abstract  
  Address From the Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and the Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School – both in Boston  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-4793 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29932841 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1942  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Foster, J.J.; Smolka, J.; Nilsson, D.-E.; Dacke, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) How animals follow the stars Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume 285 Issue 1871 Pages  
  Keywords Vision; Animals  
  Abstract Throughout history, the stars have provided humans with ever more information about our world, enabling increasingly accurate systems of navigation in addition to fuelling some of the greatest scientific controversies. What information animals have evolved to extract from a starry sky and how they do so, is a topic of study that combines the practical and theoretical challenges faced by both astronomers and field biologists. While a number of animal species have been demonstrated to use the stars as a source of directional information, the strategies that these animals use to convert this complex and variable pattern of dim-light points into a reliable 'stellar orientation' cue have been more difficult to ascertain. In this review, we assess the stars as a visual stimulus that conveys directional information, and compare the bodies of evidence available for the different stellar orientation strategies proposed to date. In this context, we also introduce new technologies that may aid in the study of stellar orientation, and suggest how field experiments may be used to characterize the mechanisms underlying stellar orientation.  
  Address Department of Biology, Lund University, Solvegatan 35, Lund 223 62, Sweden  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29367394 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1802  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: