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Author Mulvin, D.
Title (up) Media Prophylaxis: Night Modes and the Politics of Preventing Harm Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Information & Culture Abbreviated Journal Information & Culture
Volume 53 Issue 2 Pages 175-202
Keywords Human Health; Society
Abstract This article develops the term “media prophylaxis” to analyze the ways technologies are applied to challenges of calibrating one’s body with its environment and as defenses against endemic, human-made harms. In recent years, self-illuminated screens (like those of computers, phones, and tablets) have been identified by scientists, journalists, and concerned individuals as particularly pernicious sources of sleep-disrupting light. By tracing the history of circadian research, the effects of light on sleep patterns, and the recent appearance of software like “f.lux,” Apple’s “Night Shift,” and “Twilight,” this article shows how media-prophylactic technologies can individualize responsibility for preventing harm while simultaneously surfacing otherwise ignored forms of chronic suffering.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2164-8034 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1853
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Author Mulvin, D.
Title (up) Media Prophylaxis: Night Modes and the Politics of Preventing Harm Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Information & Culture Abbreviated Journal Information & Culture
Volume 53 Issue 2 Pages 175-202
Keywords History; Lighting; Society
Abstract This article develops the term “media prophylaxis” to analyze the ways technologies are applied to challenges of calibrating one’s body with its environment and as defenses against endemic, human-made harms. In recent years, self-illuminated screens (like those of computers, phones, and tablets) have been identified by scientists, journalists, and concerned individuals as particularly pernicious sources of sleep-disrupting light. By tracing the history of circadian research, the effects of light on sleep patterns, and the recent appearance of software like “f.lux,” Apple’s “Night Shift,” and “Twilight,” this article shows how media-prophylactic technologies can individualize responsibility for preventing harm while simultaneously surfacing otherwise ignored forms of chronic suffering.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2164-8034 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1917
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Author Buonfiglio, D.; Parthimos, R.; Dantas, R.; Cerqueira Silva, R.; Gomes, G.; Andrade-Silva, J.; Ramos-Lobo, A.; Amaral, F.G.; Matos, R.; Sinesio, J.J.; Motta-Teixeira, L.C.; Donato, J.J.; Reiter, R.J.; Cipolla-Neto, J.
Title (up) Melatonin Absence Leads to Long-Term Leptin Resistance and Overweight in Rats Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal Front Endocrinol (Lausanne)
Volume 9 Issue Pages 122
Keywords Human health
Abstract Melatonin (Mel), a molecule that conveys photoperiodic information to the organisms, is also involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Mechanisms of action of Mel in the energy balance remain unclear; herein we investigated how Mel regulates energy intake and expenditure to promote a proper energy balance. Male Wistar rats were assigned to control, control + Mel, pinealectomized (PINX) and PINX + Mel groups. To restore a 24-h rhythm, Mel (1 mg/kg) was added to the drinking water exclusively during the dark phase for 13 weeks. After this treatment period, rats were subjected to a 24-h fasting test, an acute leptin responsiveness test and cold challenge. Mel treatment reduced food intake, body weight, and adiposity. When challenged to 24-h fasting, Mel-treated rats also showed reduced hyperphagia when the food was replaced. Remarkably, PINX rats exhibited leptin resistance; this was likely related to the capacity of leptin to affect body weight, food intake, and hypothalamic signal-transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation, all of which were reduced. Mel treatment restored leptin sensitivity in PINX rats. An increased hypothalamic expression of agouti-related peptide (Agrp), neuropeptide Y, and Orexin was observed in the PINX group while Mel treatment reduced the expression of Agrp and Orexin. In addition, PINX rats presented lower UCP1 protein levels in the brown adipose tissue and required higher tail vasoconstriction to get a proper thermogenic response to cold challenge. Our findings reveal a previously unrecognized interaction of Mel and leptin in the hypothalamus to regulate the energy balance. These findings may help to explain the high incidence of metabolic diseases in individuals exposed to light at night.
Address Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Institute of Biomedical Sciences-I, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1664-2392 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29636725; PMCID:PMC5881424 Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2093
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Author Lee, S., Matsumori, K., Nishimura, K., Nishimura, Y., Ikeda, Y., Eto, T., & Higuchi, S.
Title (up) Melatonin suppression and sleepiness in children exposed to blue-enriched white LED lighting at night Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Physiological Reports Abbreviated Journal
Volume 6 Issue 24 Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Light-induced melatonin suppression in children is reported to be more sensitive to white light at night than that in adults; however, it is unclear whether it depends on spectral distribution of lighting. In this study, we investigated the effects of different color temperatures of LED lighting on children’s melatonin secretion during the night. Twenty-two healthy children (8.9  2.2 years old) and 20 adults (41.7  4.4 years old) participated in this

study. A between-subjects design with four combinations, including two age

groups (adults and children) and the two color temperature conditions

(3000 K and 6200 K), was used. The experiment was conducted for two consecutive nights. On the first night, saliva samples were collected every hour

under a dim light condition (<30 lx). On the second night, the participants

were exposed to either color temperature condition. Melatonin suppression in

children was greater than that in adults at both 3000 K and 6200 K condition.

The 6200 K condition resulted in greater melatonin suppression than did the

3000 K condition in children (P < 0.05) but not in adults. Subjective sleepiness in children exposed to 6200 K light was significantly lower than that in

children exposed to 3000 K light. In children, blue-enriched LED lighting has

a greater impact on melatonin suppression and it inhibits the increase in

sleepiness during night. Light with a low color temperature is recommended

at night, particularly for children’s sleep and circadian rhythm.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2312
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Author Wang, L.; Liu, X.; Liu, Z.; Wang, X.; Lei, C.; Zhu, F.
Title (up) Members of the neuropeptide transcriptional network in Helicoverpa armigera and their expression in response to light stress Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Gene Abbreviated Journal Gene
Volume 671 Issue Pages 67-77
Keywords Animals
Abstract Neuropeptides and peptide hormones play central roles in the regulation of various types of insect physiology and behavior. Artificial light at night, a form of environmental stress, has recently been regarded as a source of light stress on nocturnal insects. Because related genomic information is not available, molecular biological studies on the response of neuropeptides in nocturnal insects to light stress are limited. Based on the de novo sequencing of the Helicoverpa armigera head transcriptome, we obtained 124,960 unigenes. Of these, the number of unigenes annotated as neuropeptides and peptide hormones, neurotransmitter precursor processing enzymes, and neurotransmitter receptors were 34, 17, and 58, respectively. Under light stress, there were sex-specific differences in gene expression measured by qRT-PCR. The IMFamide, leucokinin and sNPF genes were differentially expressed at the mRNA level in males but not in females in response to light stress. The results provide new insights on the diversity of the neuropeptide transcriptional network of H. armigera. In addition, some neuropeptides exhibited sex-specific differential expression in response to light stress. Taken collectively, these results not only expand the catalog of known insect neuropeptides but also provide a framework for future functional studies on the physiological roles they play in the light stress response behavior of nocturnal moths.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0378-1119 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1910
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