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Author Stevens, R.G.
Title (up) Comment on 'Domestic light at night and breast cancer risk: a prospective analysis of 105 000 UK women in the Generations Study' Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication British Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Br J Cancer
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract
Address University of Connecticut, School of Medicine, 263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT, 06032, USA. bugs@uchc.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0007-0920 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30283145 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2035
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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Spitschan, M.
Title (up) Comment on 'Domestic light at night and breast cancer risk: a prospective analysis of 105000 UK women in the Generations Study' Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication British Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Br J Cancer
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; Commentary
Abstract
Address Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0007-0920 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30584260 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2145
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Author Hasler, B.P.
Title (up) Commentary on Bedroom Light Exposure at Night and the Incidence of Depressive Symptoms: A Longitudinal Study of the HEIJOKYO Cohort (Obayashi et al) Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 187 Issue 3 Pages 435-438
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract In modern society, we are increasingly disconnected from natural light/dark cycles and beset by round-the-clock exposure to artificial light. Light has powerful effects on physical and mental health, in part via the circadian system, and thus the timing of light exposure dictates whether it is helpful or harmful. In their compelling paper, Obayashi and colleagues offer evidence that light at night can prospectively predict an elevated incidence of depressive symptoms in older adults. Strengths of the study include the longitudinal design and direct, objective assessment of light levels, as well as accounting for multiple plausible confounders during analyses. Follow-up studies should address the study's limitations, including reliance on a global self-report of sleep quality and a two-night assessment of light exposure that may not reliably represent typical light exposure. In addition, experimental studies including physiological circadian measures will be necessary to determine if the light effects on depression are mediated through the circadian system or are so-called “direct” effects of light. In any case, these exciting findings could inform novel new approaches to preventing depressive disorders in older adults.
Address
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1716
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Author Benis, K.; Ferrão, P.
Title (up) Commercial farming within the urban built environment – Taking stock of an evolving field in northern countries Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Global Food Security Abbreviated Journal Global Food Security
Volume 17 Issue Pages 30-37
Keywords Planning
Abstract Urban horticulture has historically contributed to the supply of fresh produce to urban dwellers and has been gaining popularity over the last years in the Global North, with growing awareness of environmental and health concerns. Over the past few years, commercial farms have been emerging in major northern cities, promoting a trend of environmentally friendly food, grown in highly efficient installations on top of or in buildings. This paper presents a scoping study, including: (i) a review of the scientific literature addressing environmental, economic and social aspects of commercial farming in urban contexts; and (ii) a consultation exercise to inform and validate findings from the review, consisting of semi-structured interviews with a few practitioners in the Netherlands. The main findings are: (1) while the recent proliferation of commercial farms in major cities shows that these new modes of urban agricultural production are gaining momentum, establishing their viability as compared to conventional agricultural practices is a challenge when it comes to scalability, resource efficiency, and cost-effectiveness; (2) as it is still a relatively new field, very few studies have been conducted to quantitatively assess the impacts of commercial farming in urban areas; (3) given the complex environmental, economic and social dimensions of urban agriculture, holistic decision support tools could help integrating them in urban areas.
Address
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2211-9124 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1843
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Author Cianchetti-Benedetti, M.; Becciu, P.; Massa, B.; Dell’Omo, G.
Title (up) Conflicts between touristic recreational activities and breeding shearwaters: short-term effect of artificial light and sound on chick weight Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication European Journal of Wildlife Research Abbreviated Journal Eur J Wildl Res
Volume 64 Issue 2 Pages
Keywords Animals; Society
Abstract Human disturbances are increasingly becoming a conservation concern for many populations of colonial seabirds. Colonially reproducing species are particularly vulnerable to localised disturbances because detrimental elements can simultaneously affect the entire population. Studies of petrels and shearwaters have shown that light pollution, in particular, can be harmful for both fledglings and adults, but little is known of the way such anthropogenic elements affect the quality of parental care at the nest. Chick provisioning in petrels and shearwaters occurs exclusively at night and is also negatively correlated with the amount of moonlight. We tested the hypothesis that high-intensity light and sound disturbances will disrupt nest attendance and thus affect weight gain in chicks but that the magnitude of such effects would be modulated by moonlight conditions. We measured the effect of two outdoor disco events on overnight weight gain in 26 chicks of Scopoli’s shearwaters (Calonectris diomedea) from a breeding colony on Linosa Island. The two disco events occurred under contrasting moonlight conditions (moonless vs moonlight). Chicks situated closer to the disturbance gained significantly less weight compared to conspecifics from nests further away but the effect was only evident on the moonless night.Our results suggest that light and sound disturbances can have a negative effect on parental care in C. diomedea but moonlight might moderate the bird’s perception and thus the magnitude of the disturbance. However, while occasional disturbances may impact short-term weight gain in C. diomedea chicks, such effects are not perceivable at fledging when measured as differences in the weight or the date at which they left the nest.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1612-4642 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1839
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