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Author Farkas, T.D.; Kiràly, T.; Pardy, T.; Rang, T.; Rang, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Application of power line communication technology in street lighting control Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Design & Nature and Ecodynamics Abbreviated Journal Int. J. DNE  
  Volume 13 Issue 2 Pages 176-186  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract Rapidly increasing usage of telecommunication systems causes new transmission technologies and networks to emerge. Not only the efficiency, reliability and accessibility of the network are important, but also the economic issues. One cost-effective solution could be power line communication (PLC) technology, which transmits data using the existing electricity infrastructure. The application of this communication technique is an attractive and innovative solution for the realization of smart cities and smart homes. With intelligent control networks, energy savings can be optimized and the operating as well as maintenance costs can be reduced. Since outdoor lighting systems are the major consumers of electricity, to create a modern, energy-efficient city, intelligent street lighting control is needed. This paper provides an overview of power line communication principles including the theoretical background of data communication, modulation techniques, channel access methods, protocols, disturbances and noises. Furthermore, in order to highlight the benefits of a PLC-based street lighting control system, a pilot project will be presented.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1755-7437 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2091  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kurvers, R.H.J.M.; Drägestein, J.; Hölker, F.; Jechow, A.; Krause, J.; Bierbach, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial Light at Night Affects Emergence from a Refuge and Space Use in Guppies Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a major form of anthropogenic pollution. ALAN is well known to affect different behaviours during nighttime, when changes in light conditions often have immediate consequences for the trade-offs individuals experience. How ALAN affects daytime behaviours, however, has received far less attention. Here we studied how ALAN affected daytime personality traits and learning ability. We exposed Trinidadian guppies, Poecilia reticulata, for 10 weeks to different ALAN levels: bright light (24 hrs bright light, ~5,000 lx), dim light (12 hrs bright light; 12 hrs dim light, ~0.5 lx) and control (12 hrs bright light; 12 hrs dark). Afterwards, we tested how the treatments affected diurnal emergence from a refuge, space use, activity, sociability and the ability to memorize the location of companion fish. Individuals exposed to the light treatments (both dim and bright light) emerged quicker from a refuge and fish from the bright light treatment spent relatively more time in the open area of the arena. ALAN did not affect any of the other behaviours, although memory could not be tested since fish did not learn the companions’ location. Our results demonstrate that ALAN, next to affecting nocturnal behaviours, can also affect key diurnal behavioural processes, associated with risk-taking.  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2013  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Russart, K.L.G.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial light at night alters behavior in laboratory and wild animals Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol  
  Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 401-408  
  Keywords Animals; Review  
  Abstract Life has evolved to internalize and depend upon the daily and seasonal light cycles to synchronize physiology and behavior with environmental conditions. The nightscape has been vastly changed in response to the use of artificial lighting. Wildlife is now often exposed to direct lighting via streetlights or indirect lighting via sky glow at night. Because many activities rely on daily and seasonal light cues, the effects of artificial light at night could be extensive, but remain largely unknown. Laboratory studies suggest exposure to light at night can alter typical timing of daily locomotor activity and shift the timing of foraging/food intake to the daytime in nocturnal rodents. Additionally, nocturnal rodents decrease anxiety-like behaviors (i.e., spend more time in the open and increase rearing up) in response to even dim light at night. These are all likely maladaptive responses in the wild. Photoperiodic animals rely on seasonal changes in day length as a cue to evoke physiological and behavioral modifications to anticipate favorable and unfavorable conditions for survival and reproduction. Light at night can mask detection of short days, inappropriately signal long days, and thus desynchronize seasonal reproductive activities. We review laboratory and the sparse field studies that address the effects of exposure to artificial light at night to propose that exposure to light at night disrupts circadian and seasonal behavior in wildlife, which potentially decreases individual fitness and modifies ecosystems.  
  Address Behavioral Medicine and Psychiatry, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29806740 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1928  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Willmott, N.J.; Henneken, J.; Selleck, C.J.; Jones, T.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial light at night alters life history in a nocturnal orb-web spider Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication PeerJ Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages e5599  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The prevalence of artificial light at night (ALAN) is increasing rapidly around the world. The potential physiological costs of this night lighting are often evident in life history shifts. We investigated the effects of chronic night-time exposure to ecologically relevant levels of LED lighting on the life history traits of the nocturnal Australian garden orb-web spider (Eriophora biapicata). We reared spiders under a 12-h day and either a 12-h natural darkness (∼0 lux) or a 12-h dim light (∼20 lux) night and assessed juvenile development, growth and mortality, and adult reproductive success and survival. We found that exposure to ALAN accelerated juvenile development, resulting in spiders progressing through fewer moults, and maturing earlier and at a smaller size. There was a significant increase in daily juvenile mortality for spiders reared under 20 lux, but the earlier maturation resulted in a comparable number of 0 lux and 20 lux spiders reaching maturity. Exposure to ALAN also considerably reduced the number of eggs produced by females, and this was largely associated with ALAN-induced reductions in body size. Despite previous observations of increased fitness for some orb-web spiders in urban areas and near night lighting, it appears that exposure to artificial night lighting may lead to considerable developmental costs. Future research will need to consider the detrimental effects of ALAN combined with foraging benefits when studying nocturnal insectivores that forage around artificial lights.  
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2023  
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Author Gaston, M.S.; Pereyra, L.C.; Vaira, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial light at night and captivity induces differential effects on leukocyte profile, body condition, and erythrocyte size of a diurnal toad Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Amphibians; Toads  
  Abstract Light pollution or artificial lighting at night (ALAN) is an emerging threat to biodiversity that can disrupt physiological processes and behaviors. Because ALAN stressful effects are little studied in diurnal amphibian species, we investigated if chronic ALAN exposure affects the leukocyte profile, body condition, and blood cell sizes of a diurnal toad. We hand-captured male toads of Melanophryniscus rubriventris in Angosto de Jaire (Jujuy, Argentina). We prepared blood smears from three groups of toads: “field” (toads processed in the field immediately after capture), “natural light” (toads kept in the laboratory under captivity with natural photoperiod), and “constant light” (toads kept in the laboratory under captivity with constant photoperiod/ALAN). We significantly observed higher neutrophil proportions and neutrophils to lymphocytes ratio in toads under constant light treatment. In addition, we observed significantly better body condition and higher erythrocyte size in field toads compared with captive toads. In summary, ALAN can trigger a leukocyte response to stress in males of the diurnal toad M. rubriventris. In addition, captivity can affect the body condition and erythrocyte size of these toads.  
  Address Instituto de Ecorregiones Andinas (INECOA), Universidad Nacional de Jujuy, CONICET, San Salvador de Jujuy, Argentina  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30320969 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2049  
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