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Author Wilson, P.; Thums, M.; Pattiaratchi, C.; Meekan, M.; Pendoley, K.; Fisher, R.; Whiting, S.
Title Artificial light disrupts the nearshore dispersal of neonate flatback turtles Natator depressus Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.
Volume 600 Issue Pages 179-192
Keywords Animals
Abstract After emerging from nests, neonate sea turtles entering the water are thought to orientate away from shore using wave cues to guide them out to sea. Artificial light may interfere with this process, but the relative importance of natural and anthropogenic cues to the dispersal of hatchlings is unknown. Here, we used acoustic telemetry to track the movement of flatback turtle (Natator depressus) hatchlings dispersing through nearshore waters. Turtles dispersed in the presence and absence of artificial light through a receiver array where a range of oceanographic variables were measured. Turtle tracks were analysed using a full subsets Generalised Additive Mixed Model approach to identify the most important cues influencing the bearing, variance in bearing (a measure of the ability to orientate directly), rate of travel and time spent in the array. Artificial light reduced their swim speed by up to 30%, increased the amount of time spent in nearshore waters (by 50–150%) and increased the variance in bearing (100–180% more variable), regardless of oceanographic conditions. Under ambient conditions, ocean currents affected the bearing of hatchlings as they left the shore, but when light was present, this effect was diminished, showing turtles actively swam against currents in their attempts to move towards light. After accounting for the effects of currents on hatchlings dispersing under ambient conditions, turtles swam offshore by moving perpendicular to the coastline and did not appear to orient into incident wave direction. Overall, light disrupted the dispersal of hatchlings causing them to linger, become disoriented in the near shore and expend energy swimming against ocean currents.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1967
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Author Desaulniers, J.; Desjardins, S.; Lapierre, S.; Desgagné, A.
Title Sleep Environment and Insomnia in Elderly Persons Living at Home Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Aging Research Abbreviated Journal Journal of Aging Research
Volume 2018 Issue Pages 1-7
Keywords Human Health
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2090-2204 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2016
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Author Windle, A. E., Hooley, D. S., & Johnston, D. W.
Title Robotic Vehicles Enable High-Resolution Light Pollution Sampling of Sea Turtle Nesting Beaches Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue 493 Pages
Keywords Instrumentation; Animals; Skyglow
Abstract Nesting sea turtles appear to avoid brightly lit beaches and often turn back to sea prematurely when exposed to artificial light. Observations and experiments have noted that nesting turtles prefer darker areas where buildings and high dunes act as light barriers. As a result, sea turtles often nest on darker beaches, creating spatial concentrations of nests. Artificial nighttime light, or light pollution, has been quantified using a variety of methods. However, it has proven challenging to make accurate measurements of ambient light at fine scales and on smaller nesting beaches. Additionally, light has traditionally been measured from stationary tripods perpendicular to beach vegetation, disregarding the point of view of a nesting sea turtle. In the present study, nighttime ambient light conditions were assessed on three beaches in central North Carolina: a developed coastline of a barrier island, a nearby State Park on the same barrier island comprised of protected and undeveloped land, and a completely uninhabited wilderness on an adjacent barrier island in the Cape Lookout National Seashore. Using an autonomous terrestrial rover, high resolution light measurements (mag/arcsec2) were collected every minute with two ambient light sensors along transects on each beach. Spatial comparisons between ambient light and nesting density at and between these locations reveal that highest densities of nests occur in regions with lowest light levels, supporting the hypothesis that light pollution from coastal development may influence turtle nesting distribution. These results can be used to support ongoing management strategies to mitigate this pressing conservation issue.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2315
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Author McGlashan, E.M.; Poudel, G.R.; Vidafar, P.; Drummond, S.P.A.; Cain, S.W.
Title Imaging Individual Differences in the Response of the Human Suprachiasmatic Area to Light Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front. Neurol.
Volume 9 Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Circadian disruption is associated with poor health outcomes, including sleep and mood disorders. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus acts as the master biological clock in mammals, regulating circadian rhythms throughout the body. The clock is synchronized to the day/night cycle via retinal light exposure. The BOLD-fMRI response of the human suprachiasmatic area to light has been shown to be greater in the night than in the day, consistent with the known sensitivity of the clock to light at night. Whether the BOLD-fMRI response of the human suprachiasmatic area to light is related to a functional outcome has not been demonstrated. In a pilot study (n = 10), we investigated suprachiasmatic area activation in response to light in a 30 s block-paradigm of lights on (100 lux) and lights off (< 1 lux) using the BOLD-fMRI response, compared to each participant's melatonin suppression response to moderate indoor light (100 lux). We found a significant correlation between activation in the suprachiasmatic area in response to light in the scanner and melatonin suppression, with increased melatonin suppression being associated with increased suprachiasmatic area activation in response to the same light level. These preliminary findings are a first step toward using imaging techniques to measure individual differences in circadian light sensitivity, a measure that may have clinical relevance in understanding vulnerability in disorders that are influenced by circadian disruption.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1664-2295 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2114
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Author Mascovich, K. A., Larson, L. R., & Andrews, K. M.
Title Lights On, or Lights Off? Hotel Guests' Response to Nonpersonal Educational Outreach Designed to Protect Nesting Sea Turtles Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Chelonian Conservation and Biology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 206-215
Keywords Education; Psychology
Abstract Light pollution from beachfront hotels has the potential to impact nesting and hatching sea turtles. Education strategies could be used to alter visitor behavior and mitigate this threat. We tested the efficacy of a sea turtle–friendly education card that encouraged visitors to “protect the night, hide the light.” Cards were placed in beachfront hotel rooms at a prominent sea turtle nesting site: Jekyll Island, Georgia. We assessed visitor responses by conducting nightly observations to determine the proportion of occupied guest rooms with beach-visible lights under 2 different scenarios (cards present or cards absent). We found that less than half of all hotel guests closed room blinds to minimize artificial light on the nesting beach, and compliance rates seemed to be lower during peak visitation times. The nonpersonal educational treatment (card) had little effect on visitors' sea turtle–friendly lighting choices and behaviors, highlighting the need for other approaches to encourage responsible tourist behavior at ecologically sensitive beach destinations.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2316
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