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Author Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lighting up the nighttime Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 362 Issue 6416 Pages 744-746  
  Keywords Commentary  
  Abstract Among the most visually compelling images of the whole Earth have been those created using data obtained at night by astronauts or from satellites. The proliferation in use of electric lighting—including from industrial, commercial, municipal, and domestic sources—is striking. It sketches the spatial distribution of much of the human population, outlining a substantial proportion of the world's coastline, highlighting a multitude of towns and cities, and drawing the major highways that connect them. The data embodied in these nighttime images have been used to estimate and map levels of energy use, urbanization, and economic activity. They have also been key in focusing attention on the environmental impacts of the artificial light at night itself. Explicit steps need to be taken to limit these impacts, which vary according to the intensity, spectrum, spatial extent, and temporal dynamics of this lighting.  
  Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, UK. k.j.gaston@exeter.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30442788 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2058  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Griepentrog, J.E.; Labiner, H.E.; Gunn, S.R.; Rosengart, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bright environmental light improves the sleepiness of nightshift ICU nurses Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Critical Care (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Crit Care  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 295  
  Keywords Circadian; Light; Night shift; Nurse; Shift work sleep disorder  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Shift work can disturb circadian homeostasis and result in fatigue, excessive sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. Light therapy has been shown to impart positive effects in night shift workers. We sought to determine whether or not prolonged exposure to bright light during a night shift reduces sleepiness and enhances psychomotor performance among ICU nurses.

METHODS: This is a single-center randomized, crossover clinical trial at a surgical trauma ICU. ICU nurses working a night shift were exposed to a 10-h period of high illuminance (1500-2000 lx) white light compared to standard ambient fluorescent lighting of the hospital. They then completed the Stanford Sleepiness Scale and the Psychomotor Vigilance Test. The primary and secondary endpoints were analyzed using the paired t test. A p value <0.05 was considered significant.

RESULTS: A total of 43 matched pairs completed both lighting exposures and were analyzed. When exposed to high illuminance lighting subjects experienced reduced sleepiness scores on the Stanford Sleepiness Scale than when exposed to standard hospital lighting: mean (sem) 2.6 (0.2) vs. 3.0 (0.2), p = 0.03. However, they committed more psychomotor errors: 2.3 (0.2) vs. 1.7 (0.2), p = 0.03.

CONCLUSIONS: A bright lighting environment for ICU nurses working the night shift reduces sleepiness but increases the number of psychomotor errors.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03331822 . Retrospectively registered on 6 November 2017.
 
  Address Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. rosengartmr@upmc.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1364-8535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30424793 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2070  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shima, J.S.; Swearer, S.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Moonlight enhances growth in larval fish Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal Ecology  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Moonlight  
  Abstract Moonlight mediates trophic interactions and shapes the evolution of life-history strategies for nocturnal organisms. Reproductive cycles and important life-history transitions for many marine organisms coincide with moon phases, but few studies consider the effects of moonlight on pelagic larvae at sea. We evaluated effects of moonlight on growth of pelagic larvae of a temperate reef fish using 'master chronologies' of larval growth constructed from age-independent daily increment widths recorded in otoliths of 321 individuals. We found that daily growth rates of fish larvae were enhanced by lunar illumination after controlling for the positive influence of temperature and the negative influence of cloud cover. Collectively, these results indicate that moonlight enhances growth rates of larval fish. This pattern is likely the result of moonlight's combined effects on foraging efficiency and suppression of diel migrations of mesopelagic predators, and has the potential to drive evolution of marine life histories. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3010, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30422325 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2059  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bharti, N.; Tatem, A.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Fluctuations in anthropogenic nighttime lights from satellite imagery for five cities in Niger and Nigeria Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Scientific Data Abbreviated Journal Sci Data  
  Volume 5 Issue Pages 180256  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Dynamic measures of human populations are critical for global health management but are often overlooked, largely because they are difficult to quantify. Measuring human population dynamics can be prohibitively expensive in under-resourced communities. Satellite imagery can provide measurements of human populations, past and present, to complement public health analyses and interventions. We used anthropogenic illumination from publicly accessible, serial satellite nighttime images as a quantifiable proxy for seasonal population variation in five urban areas in Niger and Nigeria. We identified population fluxes as the mechanistic driver of regional seasonal measles outbreaks. Our data showed 1) urban illumination fluctuated seasonally, 2) corresponding population fluctuations were sufficient to drive seasonal measles outbreaks, and 3) overlooking these fluctuations during vaccination activities resulted in below-target coverage levels, incapable of halting transmission of the virus. We designed immunization solutions capable of achieving above-target coverage of both resident and mobile populations. Here, we provide detailed data on brightness from 2000-2005 for 5 cities in Niger and Nigeria and detailed methodology for application to other populations.  
  Address WorldPop, Department of Geography and Environment, University of Southampton; Flowminder Foundation, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2052-4463 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30422123; PMCID:PMC6233255 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2769  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vetter, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian disruption: What do we actually mean? Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract The circadian system regulates physiology and behavior. Acute challenges to the system, such as those experienced during travel across time zones, will eventually result in re-synchronization to the local environmental time cues, but this re-synchronization is oftentimes accompanied by adverse short-term consequences. When such challenges are experienced chronically, adaptation may not be achieved, as for example in the case of rotating night shift workers. The transient and chronic disturbance of the circadian system is most frequently referred to as “circadian disruption”, but many other terms have been proposed and used to refer to similar situations. It is now beyond doubt that the circadian system contributes to health and disease, emphasizing the need for clear terminology when describing challenges to the circadian system and their consequences. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the terms used to describe disruption of the circadian system, discuss proposed quantifications of disruption in experimental and observational settings with a focus on human research, and highlight limitations and challenges of currently available tools. For circadian research to advance as a translational science, clear, operationalizable, and scalable quantifications of circadian disruption are key, as they will enable improved assessment and reproducibility of results, ideally ranging from mechanistic settings, including animal research, to large-scale randomized clinical trials. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30402904 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2057  
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