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Author Lee, S-H.; Lim, H-S.
Title A Study on Sky Light Pollution based on Sky Glow in Jeju Island Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of the Architectural Institute of Korea Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 34 Issue 4 Pages 83-91
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract Artificial lighting contributes greatly to developing civilizations. It allows daytime activities to continue throughout the dark hours of the day and thus increasing work productivity as well as allowing people to enjoy nighttime activities. In addition, artificial lighting is used to beautify landscapes, architectural monuments, and thus highlighting the social-economic development of a given place. However, excessive and improper usage of artificial lighting can lead to light pollution. Light pollution is a serious issue that is detrimental to human health. It has been linked to a number of health conditions including sleep disorder, visual discomfort as well as cancer. The effects of light pollution extend throughout the entire ecosystem, affecting both plants and animals. Furthermore, sky-glow from light pollution hinders astronomical observation. The current paper presents a study conducted on lit environment of a nightscape. The quality of the sky was measured in 144 spots using Sky Quality Meter (SQM) devices. The measured spots were chosen on the basis of land use as well as distance from the Halla Mountain.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2105
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Author Matveyenko, A.V.
Title Consideration for Circadian Physiology in Rodent Research Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Physiology (Bethesda, Md.) Abbreviated Journal Physiology (Bethesda)
Volume (down) 33 Issue 4 Pages 250-251
Keywords Animals; Commentary
Abstract
Address Mayo Clinic , Rochester, Minnesota
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 1548-9221 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29873599 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1935
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Author Mason, I.C.; Boubekri, M.; Figueiro, M.G.; Hasler, B.P.; Hattar, S.; Hill, S.M.; Nelson, R.J.; Sharkey, K.M.; Wright, K.P.; Boyd, W.A.; Brown, M.K.; Laposky, A.D.; Twery, M.J.; Zee, P.C.
Title Circadian Health and Light: A Report on the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Workshop Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume (down) 33 Issue 5 Pages 451-457
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Despite the omnipresence of artificial and natural light exposure, there exists little guidance in the United States and elsewhere on light exposure in terms of timing, intensity, spectrum, and other light characteristics known to affect human health, performance, and well-being; in parallel, there is little information regarding the quantity and characteristics of light exposure that people receive. To address this, the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research, in the Division of Lung Diseases, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, held a workshop in August 2016 on circadian health and light. Workshop participants discussed scientific research advances on the effects of light on human physiology, identified remaining knowledge gaps in these research areas, and articulated opportunities to use appropriate lighting to protect and improve circadian-dependent health. Based on this workshop, participants put forth the following strategic intent, objectives, and strategies to guide discovery, measurement, education, and implementation of the appropriate use of light to achieve, promote, and maintain circadian health in modern society.
Address Center for Circadian and Sleep Medicine, Department of Neurology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois
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ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30033850 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1975
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Author Souman, J.L.; Borra, T.; de Goijer, I.; Schlangen, L.J.M.; Vlaskamp, B.N.S.; Lucassen, M.P.
Title Spectral Tuning of White Light Allows for Strong Reduction in Melatonin Suppression without Changing Illumination Level or Color Temperature Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume (down) 33 Issue 4 Pages 420-431
Keywords Human Health; Lighting
Abstract Studies with monochromatic light stimuli have shown that the action spectrum for melatonin suppression exhibits its highest sensitivity at short wavelengths, around 460 to 480 nm. Other studies have demonstrated that filtering out the short wavelengths from white light reduces melatonin suppression. However, this filtering of short wavelengths was generally confounded with reduced light intensity and/or changes in color temperature. Moreover, it changed the appearance from white light to yellow/orange, rendering it unusable for many practical applications. Here, we show that selectively tuning a polychromatic white light spectrum, compensating for the reduction in spectral power between 450 and 500 nm by enhancing power at even shorter wavelengths, can produce greatly different effects on melatonin production, without changes in illuminance or color temperature. On different evenings, 15 participants were exposed to 3 h of white light with either low or high power between 450 and 500 nm, and the effects on salivary melatonin levels and alertness were compared with those during a dim light baseline. Exposure to the spectrum with low power between 450 and 500 nm, but high power at even shorter wavelengths, did not suppress melatonin compared with dim light, despite a large difference in illuminance (175 vs. <5 lux). In contrast, exposure to the spectrum with high power between 450 and 500 nm (also 175 lux) resulted in almost 50% melatonin suppression. For alertness, no significant differences between the 3 conditions were observed. These results open up new opportunities for lighting applications that allow for the use of electrical lighting without disturbance of melatonin production.
Address Philips Lighting Research, Department Lighting Applications, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29984614 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1985
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Author Suh, Y.-W.; Na, K.-H.; Ahn, S.-E.; Oh, J.
Title Effect of Ambient Light Exposure on Ocular Fatigue during Sleep Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Korean Medical Science Abbreviated Journal J Korean Med Sci
Volume (down) 33 Issue 38 Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Background

To investigate the influence of nocturnal ambient light on visual function and ocular fatigue.

Methods

Sixty healthy subjects (30 males and 30 females) aged 19 through 29 years with no history of ocular disease were recruited. All subjects spent 3 consecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. During the first and second nights, the subjects were not exposed to light during sleep, but during the third night, they were exposed to ambient light, measuring 5 or 10 lux at the eye level, which was randomly allocated with 30 subjects each. The visual function and ocular fatigue were assessed at 7 a.m. on the 3rd and 4th mornings, using best-corrected visual acuity, refractive error, conjunctival hyperemia, tear break-up time, maximal blinking interval, ocular surface temperature, and subjective symptoms reported on a questionnaire.

Results

Three male and three female subjects failed to complete the study (4 in the 5 lux; 2 from the 10 lux). For the entire 54 subjects, tear break-up time and maximal blinking interval decreased (P = 0.015; 0.010, respectively), and nasal and temporal conjunctival hyperemia increased significantly after sleep under any ambient light (P < 0.001; 0.021, respectively). Eye tiredness and soreness also increased (P = 0.004; 0.024, respectively). After sleep under 5 lux light, only nasal conjunctival hyperemia increased significantly (P = 0.008). After sleep under 10 lux light, nasal and temporal conjunctival hyperemia, eye tiredness, soreness, difficulty in focusing, and ocular discomfort increased significantly (P < 0.05).

Conclusion

Nocturnal ambient light exposure increases ocular fatigue. Avoiding ambient light during sleep could be recommended to prevent ocular fatigue.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1011-8934 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1991
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