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Author Willmott, N.J.; Henneken, J.; Selleck, C.J.; Jones, T.M.
Title Artificial light at night alters life history in a nocturnal orb-web spider Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication PeerJ Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 6 Issue Pages e5599
Keywords Animals
Abstract The prevalence of artificial light at night (ALAN) is increasing rapidly around the world. The potential physiological costs of this night lighting are often evident in life history shifts. We investigated the effects of chronic night-time exposure to ecologically relevant levels of LED lighting on the life history traits of the nocturnal Australian garden orb-web spider (Eriophora biapicata). We reared spiders under a 12-h day and either a 12-h natural darkness (∼0 lux) or a 12-h dim light (∼20 lux) night and assessed juvenile development, growth and mortality, and adult reproductive success and survival. We found that exposure to ALAN accelerated juvenile development, resulting in spiders progressing through fewer moults, and maturing earlier and at a smaller size. There was a significant increase in daily juvenile mortality for spiders reared under 20 lux, but the earlier maturation resulted in a comparable number of 0 lux and 20 lux spiders reaching maturity. Exposure to ALAN also considerably reduced the number of eggs produced by females, and this was largely associated with ALAN-induced reductions in body size. Despite previous observations of increased fitness for some orb-web spiders in urban areas and near night lighting, it appears that exposure to artificial night lighting may lead to considerable developmental costs. Future research will need to consider the detrimental effects of ALAN combined with foraging benefits when studying nocturnal insectivores that forage around artificial lights.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2023
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Author Boyce, P.R.
Title The Present and Future of Lighting Research Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication SDAR* Journal of Sustainable Design & Applied Research Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 6 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords Commentary; Lighting; Vision; Human Health
Abstract The aim of this paper is to consider where lighting research is today and what its future might be. There is little doubt that, today, lighting research is an active field. A brief review of the topics being studied reveals that they range from residual studies on visibility and visual discomfort, through attempts to identify the influence of lighting on factors beyond visibility such as mood and behaviour, to the whole new field of light and health. But activity alone is not enough to justify a future. For lighting research to have a future it is necessary for it to

be influential. To become influential, research needs to focus its attention on outcomes that matter to people and the elements of those outcomes on which lighting is known to have a major influence. Further, researchers will have to be determined to overcome the barriers to changing lighting practice. By doing this, lighting research may change the world for the better, to be an important topic, not an irrelevance.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2113
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Author Lee, S., Matsumori, K., Nishimura, K., Nishimura, Y., Ikeda, Y., Eto, T., & Higuchi, S.
Title Melatonin suppression and sleepiness in children exposed to blue-enriched white LED lighting at night Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Physiological Reports Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 6 Issue 24 Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Light-induced melatonin suppression in children is reported to be more sensitive to white light at night than that in adults; however, it is unclear whether it depends on spectral distribution of lighting. In this study, we investigated the effects of different color temperatures of LED lighting on children’s melatonin secretion during the night. Twenty-two healthy children (8.9  2.2 years old) and 20 adults (41.7  4.4 years old) participated in this

study. A between-subjects design with four combinations, including two age

groups (adults and children) and the two color temperature conditions

(3000 K and 6200 K), was used. The experiment was conducted for two consecutive nights. On the first night, saliva samples were collected every hour

under a dim light condition (<30 lx). On the second night, the participants

were exposed to either color temperature condition. Melatonin suppression in

children was greater than that in adults at both 3000 K and 6200 K condition.

The 6200 K condition resulted in greater melatonin suppression than did the

3000 K condition in children (P < 0.05) but not in adults. Subjective sleepiness in children exposed to 6200 K light was significantly lower than that in

children exposed to 3000 K light. In children, blue-enriched LED lighting has

a greater impact on melatonin suppression and it inhibits the increase in

sleepiness during night. Light with a low color temperature is recommended

at night, particularly for children’s sleep and circadian rhythm.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2312
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Author Wu, B.; Wang, Y.; Wu, X.; Liu, D.; Xu, D.; Wang, F.
Title On-orbit sleep problems of astronauts and countermeasures Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Military Medical Research Abbreviated Journal Mil Med Res
Volume (down) 5 Issue 1 Pages 17
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Sufficient sleep duration and good sleep quality are crucial to ensure normal physical and mental health, cognition and work performance for the common people, as well as astronauts. On-orbit sleep problem is very common among astronauts and has potential detrimental influences on the health of crewmembers and the safety of flight missions. Sleep in space is becoming a new medical research frontier. In this review we summarized on-orbit sleep problems of astronauts and six kinds of causes, and we presented the effects of lack of sleep on performance as well as mental and physical health, then we proposed seven kinds of countermeasures for sleep disturbance in spaceflight, including pharmacologic interventions, light treatment, crew selection and training, Traditional Chinese Medicine and so on. Furthermore, we discussed and oriented the prospect of researches on sleep in space.
Address State Key Laboratory of Space Medicine Fundamentals and Application, China Astronaut Research and Training Center, No. 26 Beiqing Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100094, People's Republic of China
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2054-9369 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29843821; PMCID:PMC5975626 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1930
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Author Rowse, E.G.; Harris, S.; Jones, G.
Title Effects of dimming light-emitting diode street lights on light-opportunistic and light-averse bats in suburban habitats Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal R. Soc. open sci.
Volume (down) 5 Issue 6 Pages 180205
Keywords Animals; Lighting
Abstract Emerging lighting technologies provide opportunities for reducing carbon footprints, and for biodiversity conservation. In addition to installing light-emitting diode street lights, many local authorities are also dimming street lights. This might benefit light-averse bat species by creating dark refuges for these bats to forage and commute in human-dominated habitats. We conducted a field experiment to determine how light intensity affects the activity of the light-opportunistic Pipistrellus pipistrellus and light-averse bats in the genus Myotis. We used four lighting levels controlled under a central management system at existing street lights in a suburban environment (0, 25, 50 and 100% of the original output). Higher light intensities (50 and 100% of original output) increased the activity of light-opportunistic species but reduced the activity of light-averse bats. Compared to the unlit treatment, the 25% lighting level did not significantly affect either P. pipistrellus or Myotis spp. Our results suggest that it is possible to achieve a light intensity that provides both economic and ecological benefits by providing sufficient light for human requirements while not deterring light-averse bats.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2054-5703 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1931
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