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Author Robertson, B.A.; Keddy-Hector, I.A.; Shrestha, S.D.; Silverberg, L.Y.; Woolner, C.E.; Hetterich, I.; Horváth, G.
Title Susceptibility to ecological traps is similar among closely related taxa but sensitive to spatial isolation Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 135 Issue Pages 77-84
Keywords aquatic insect; behaviour; evolutionary trap; light pollution; maladaptation; polarized light pollution
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ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1793
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Author Emmer, K.M.; Russart, K.L.G.; Walker, W.H.; Nelson, R.J.; DeVries, A.C.
Title Effects of light at night on laboratory animals and research outcomes Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Behavioral Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Behav Neurosci
Volume (down) 132 Issue 4 Pages 302-314
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light has substantial influences on the physiology and behavior of most laboratory animals. As such, lighting conditions within animal rooms are potentially significant and often underappreciated variables within experiments. Disruption of the light/dark cycle, primarily by exposing animals to light at night (LAN), disturbs biological rhythms and has widespread physiological consequences because of mechanisms such as melatonin suppression, sympathetic stimulation, and altered circadian clock gene expression. Thus, attention to the lighting environment of laboratory animals and maintaining consistency of a light/dark cycle is imperative for study reproducibility. Light intensity, as well as wavelength, photoperiod, and timing, are all important variables. Although modern rodent facilities are designed to facilitate appropriate light cycling, there are simple ways to modify rooms to prevent extraneous light exposure during the dark period. Attention to lighting conditions of laboratory animals by both researchers and research care staff ensures best practices for maintaining animal welfare, as well as reproducibility of research results. (PsycINFO Database Record
Address Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0735-7044 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29952608 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1957
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Author Hiltunen, A. P., Kumpula, T., &Tykkyläinen, M.
Title Yövalaistuksen ja valopäästöjen alueellinen jakautuminen Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Geoinformatiikka Yhteiskunnassa Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 130 Issue 4 Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Remotely-sensed night-time lights (NTL) reveal the occurrence of human development while excessive light emissions cause ecological impacts and may create human health hazards. The aim of this research is to find out the factors affecting the quantity of remotely-sensed NTLs in Finland at 2015. We also aim to unveil how much NTLs have changed in Finland from 1993 to 2012 and what is the share of NTLs for different land use types in Finland in 2015. Answers to these questions are achieved with satellite radiance data and data on spatial structure, multiple linear regression (MLR), and change-detection methods. National and regional MLR models were produced to explain NTL and to compare the suitability of this modelling approach in different regions. Radiance is explained by population density, industrial building density, and lit roads density. Surprisingly, the brightest areas in Finland seem to be in Närpiö, a rural area with low population density but where greenhouse farming is common. Based on change-detection, new light sources have emerged because of the expansion of mining and tourism industries.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Finnish Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2354
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Author Wittenbrink, N.; Ananthasubramaniam, B.; Munch, M.; Koller, B.; Maier, B.; Weschke, C.; Bes, F.; de Zeeuw, J.; Nowozin, C.; Wahnschaffe, A.; Wisniewski, S.; Zaleska, M.; Bartok, O.; Ashwal-Fluss, R.; Lammert, H.; Herzel, H.; Hummel, M.; Kadener, S.; Kunz, D.; Kramer, A.
Title High-accuracy determination of internal circadian time from a single blood sample Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Clinical Investigation Abbreviated Journal J Clin Invest
Volume (down) 128 Issue 9 Pages 3826-3839
Keywords Human Health
Abstract BACKGROUND: The circadian clock is a fundamental and pervasive biological program that coordinates 24-hour rhythms in physiology, metabolism, and behavior, and it is essential to health. Whereas therapy adapted to time of day is increasingly reported to be highly successful, it needs to be personalized, since internal circadian time is different for each individual. In addition, internal time is not a stable trait, but is influenced by many factors, including genetic predisposition, age, sex, environmental light levels, and season. An easy and convenient diagnostic tool is currently missing. METHODS: To establish a validated test, we followed a 3-stage biomarker development strategy: (a) using circadian transcriptomics of blood monocytes from 12 individuals in a constant routine protocol combined with machine learning approaches, we identified biomarkers for internal time; and these biomarkers (b) were migrated to a clinically relevant gene expression profiling platform (NanoString) and (c) were externally validated using an independent study with 28 early or late chronotypes. RESULTS: We developed a highly accurate and simple assay (BodyTime) to estimate the internal circadian time in humans from a single blood sample. Our assay needs only a small set of blood-based transcript biomarkers and is as accurate as the current gold standard method, dim-light melatonin onset, at smaller monetary, time, and sample-number cost. CONCLUSION: The BodyTime assay provides a new diagnostic tool for personalization of health care according to the patient's circadian clock. FUNDING: This study was supported by the Bundesministerium fur Bildung und Forschung, Germany (FKZ: 13N13160 and 13N13162) and Intellux GmbH, Germany.
Address Charite Universitatsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universitat Berlin, Humboldt-Universitat zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Laboratory of Chronobiology, Berlin, Germany
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-9738 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29953415; PMCID:PMC6118629 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2194
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Author Manfrin, A.; Lehmann, D.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Larsen, S.; Syväranta, J.; Wharton, G.; Voigt, C.C.; Monaghan, M.T.; Hölker, F.
Title Dietary changes in predators and scavengers in a nocturnally illuminated riparian ecosystem Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Oikos Abbreviated Journal Oikos
Volume (down) 127 Issue 7 Pages 960-969
Keywords Ecology; Animals
Abstract Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are linked by fluxes of carbon and nutrients in riparian areas. Processes that alter these fluxes may therefore change the diet and composition of consumer communities. We used stable carbon isotope (δ13C) analyses to test whether the increased abundance of aquatic prey observed in a previous study led to a dietary shift in riparian consumers in areas illuminated by artificial light at night (ALAN). We measured the contribution of aquatic-derived carbon to diets in riparian arthropods in experimentally lit and unlit sites along an agricultural drainage ditch in northern Germany. The δ13C signature of the spider Pachygnatha clercki (Tetragnathidae) was 0.7‰ lower in the ALAN-illuminated site in summer, indicating a greater assimilation of aquatic prey. Bayesian mixing models also supported higher intake of aquatic prey under ALAN in summer (34% versus 21%). In contrast, isotopic signatures for P. clercki (0.3‰) and Pardosa prativaga (0.7‰) indicated a preference for terrestrial prey in the illuminated site in summer. Terrestrial prey intake increased in spring for P. clercki under ALAN (from 70% to 74%) and in spring and autumn for P. prativaga (from 68% to 77% and from 67% to 72%) and Opiliones (from 68% to 72%; 68% to 75%). This was despite most of the available prey (up to 80%) being aquatic in origin. We conclude that ALAN changed the diet of riparian secondary consumers by increasing the density of both aquatic and terrestrial prey. Dietary changes were species- and season-specific, indicating that the effects of ALAN may interact with phenology and feeding strategy. Because streetlights can occur in high density near freshwaters, ALAN may have widespread effects on aquatic-terrestrial ecosystem linkages.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0030-1299 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1811
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