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Author Grenis, K.; Murphy, S.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Direct and indirect effects of light pollution on the performance of an herbivorous insect Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Insect Science Abbreviated Journal Insect Sci  
  Volume (down) 26 Issue 4 Pages 770-776  
  Keywords Animals; Plants  
  Abstract Light pollution is a global disturbance with resounding impacts on a wide variety of organisms, but our understanding of these impacts is restricted to relatively few higher vertebrate species. We tested the direct effects of light pollution on herbivore performance as well as indirect effects mediated by host plant quality. We found that artificial light from streetlights alters plant toughness. Additionally, we found evidence of both direct and indirect effects of light pollution on the performance of an herbivorous insect, which indicates that streetlights can have cascading impacts on multiple trophic levels. Our novel findings suggest that light pollution can alter plant-insect interactions and thus may have important community-wide consequences.  
  Address Department of Biological Sciences, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1672-9609 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29425403 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1865  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rybnikova, N.; Stevens, R.G.; Gregorio, D.I.; Samociuk, H.; Portnov, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Kernel density analysis reveals a halo pattern of breast cancer incidence in Connecticut Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology  
  Volume (down) 26 Issue Pages 143-151  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Breast cancer (BC) incidence rates in Connecticut are among the highest in the United States, and are unevenly distributed within the state. Our goal was to determine whether artificial light at night (ALAN) played a role. Using BC records obtained from the Connecticut Tumor Registry, we applied the double kernel density (DKD) estimator to produce a continuous relative risk surface of a disease throughout the State. A multi-variate analysis compared DKD and census track estimates with population density, fertility rate, percent of non-white population, population below poverty level, and ALAN levels. The analysis identified a “halo” geographic pattern of BC incidence, with the highest rates of the disease observed at distances 5-15 km from the state's major cities. The “halo” was of high-income communities, with high ALAN, located in suburban fringes of the state's main cities.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1877-5845 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1961  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Challéat, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Le socioécosystème environnement nocturne : un objet de recherche interdisciplinaire Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Natures Sciences Sociétés Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 26 Issue 3 Pages 257-269  
  Keywords Commentary; Review  
  Abstract Résumé

Cet article expose le cheminement par lequel nous constituons lʼenvironnement nocturne en objet de recherche interdisciplinaire. Apparue dans les années 1990 suite à la requalification environnementale de lʼéclairage urbain en pollution lumineuse, cette notion floue vise à appréhender les systèmes – humains ou non – fonctionnellement liés à la nuit et à lʼobscurité. En nous appuyant sur lʼobservation des processus de construction, de légitimation et de territorialisation de lʼenvironnement nocturne, nous montrons que cette notion opère une jonction entre différentes acceptions et approches fortement cloisonnées des rôles, fonctions et effets de lʼéclairage artificiel nocturne (ALAN, pour artificial light at night1). Nous proposons dʼaborder son étude suivant le cadre dʼanalyse des socioécosystèmes qui nécessite la mise en interaction des différentes approches de lʼALAN par les sciences de la société et les sciences du vivant.

Abstract

This paper explains the scientific reasoning that led us to institute the “night environment” as new interdisciplinary research topic from a social-ecological perspective. Sociocultural, ecological and health costs of artificial light at night (ALAN) have been gradually highlighted since the second half of the twentieth century in a range of scientific fields, from astronomy to medicine through ecology and energy. At the same time an environmentalist movement was emerging: the “dark-sky movement” which condemns “light pollution” and carries its demands within local, national or international arenas. In the 1990s, the requalification of urban lighting as light pollution gave rise to the ill-defined notion of night environment. This notion aims to understand the systems, both human and non-human, that are functionally related to the night and darkness. Building on medium and long-term observations of the processes of construction, legitimation and territorialization of the nocturnal environment, we demonstrate that this notion enables to establish a junction between the different strongly compartmentalized meanings and approaches of the roles, functions and effects of ALAN, and more specifically of urban lighting. We propose to approach its study based on the social-ecological systems framework. This requires creating strong interactions between the different approaches of ALAN: those of the social sciences and those of the experimental, life and health sciences.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language French Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2317  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vaaja, M. T., Kurkela, M., Maksimainen, M., Virtanen, J., Kukko, A., Lehtola, V. V., Hyyppä, J., & Hyyppä, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title MOBILE MAPPING OF NIGHT-TIME ROAD ENVIRONMENT LIGHTING CONDITIONS Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Photogrammetric Journal of Finland Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 26 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Lighting; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The measurement of 3D geometry for road environments is one of the main applications of mobile mapping systems (MMS). We present mobile mapping applied to a night-time road environment. We integrate the measurement of luminances into a georeferenced 3D point cloud. The luminance measurement and the 3D point cloud acquired with an MMS are used in assessing road environment lighting conditions. Luminance (cd/m2) was measured with a luminance-calibrated panoramic camera system, and point cloud was produced by laser scanners. The relative orientation between the GNSS, IMU, camera, and laser scanner sensors was solved in order to

integrate the data sets into the same coordinate system. Hence, the georeferenced luminance values are transferable into geographic information systems (GIS). The method provides promising results for future road lighting assessment. In addition, this article demonstrates the night-time mobile mapping principle applied to a road section in Helsinki, Finland. Finally, we discuss the

future applications of mobile-mapped luminance point clouds.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2650  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zubidat, A.E.; Fares, B.; Fares, F.; Haim, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Light at Night of Different Spectral Compositions Differentially Affects Tumor Growth in Mice: Interaction With Melatonin and Epigenetic Pathways Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Cancer Control : Journal of the Moffitt Cancer Center Abbreviated Journal Cancer Control  
  Volume (down) 25 Issue 1 Pages 1073274818812908  
  Keywords Human Health; 6-Smt; Cfl; EE-halogen; GDM-levels; body mass; carbon; corticosterone; cosinor analysis; light at night; yellow-LED  
  Abstract Lighting technology is rapidly advancing toward shorter wavelength illuminations that offer energy-efficient properties. Along with this advantage, the increased use of such illuminations also poses some health challenges, particularly breast cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the effects of artificial light at night (ALAN) of 4 different spectral compositions (500-595 nm) at 350 Lux on melatonin suppression by measuring its urine metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, global DNA methylation, tumor growth, metastases formation, and urinary corticosterone levels in 4T1 breast cancer cell-inoculated female BALB/c mice. The results revealed an inverse dose-dependent relationship between wavelength and melatonin suppression. Short wavelength increased tumor growth, promoted lung metastases formation, and advanced DNA hypomethylation, while long wavelength lessened these effects. Melatonin treatment counteracted these effects and resulted in reduced cancer burden. The wavelength suppression threshold for melatonin-induced tumor growth was 500 nm. These results suggest that short wavelength increases cancer burden by inducing aberrant DNA methylation mediated by the suppression of melatonin. Additionally, melatonin suppression and global DNA methylation are suggested as promising biomarkers for early diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer. Finally, ALAN may manifest other physiological responses such as stress responses that may challenge the survival fitness of the animal under natural environments.  
  Address 1 The Israeli Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Chronobiology, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1073-2748 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30477310; PMCID:PMC6259078 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2143  
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