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Author Koen, E.L.; Minnaar, C.; Roever, C.L.; Boyles, J.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Emerging threat of the 21(st) century lightscape to global biodiversity Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol  
  Volume (down) 24 Issue 6 Pages 2315-2324  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Over the last century the temporal and spatial distribution of light on Earth has been drastically altered by human activity. Despite mounting evidence of detrimental effects of light pollution on organisms and their trophic interactions, the extent to which light pollution threatens biodiversity on a global scale remains unclear. We assessed the spatial extent and magnitude of light encroachment by measuring change in the extent of light using satellite imagery from 1992 to 2012 relative to species richness for terrestrial and freshwater mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians. The encroachment of light into previously dark areas was consistently high, often doubling, in areas of high species richness for all four groups. This pattern persisted for nocturnal groups (e.g., bats, owls, and geckos) and species considered vulnerable to extinction. Areas with high species richness and large increases in light extent were clustered within newly industrialized regions where expansion of light is likely to continue unabated unless we act to conserve remaining darkness. Implementing change at a global scale requires global public, and therefore scientific, support. Here, we offer substantial evidence that light extent is increasing where biodiversity is high, representing an emerging threat to global biodiversity requiring immediate attention. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Center for Ecology and Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois, 62901, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29575356 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1833  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Davies, T.W.; Smyth, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Why artificial light at night should be a focus for global change research in the 21st century Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol  
  Volume (down) 24 Issue 3 Pages 872-882  
  Keywords Commentary; Animals; Plants  
  Abstract The environmental impacts of artificial light at night have been a rapidly growing field of global change science in recent years. Yet, light pollution has not achieved parity with other global change phenomena in the level of concern and interest it receives from the scientific community, government and nongovernmental organizations. This is despite the globally widespread, expanding and changing nature of night-time lighting and the immediacy, severity and phylogenetic breath of its impacts. In this opinion piece, we evidence 10 reasons why artificial light at night should be a focus for global change research in the 21st century. Our reasons extend beyond those concerned principally with the environment, to also include impacts on human health, culture and biodiversity conservation more generally. We conclude that the growing use of night-time lighting will continue to raise numerous ecological, human health and cultural issues, but that opportunities exist to mitigate its impacts by combining novel technologies with sound scientific evidence. The potential gains from appropriate management extend far beyond those for the environment, indeed it may play a key role in transitioning towards a more sustainable society.  
  Address Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth, Devon, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29124824 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2054  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Masri, S.; Sassone-Corsi, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The emerging link between cancer, metabolism, and circadian rhythms Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Nature Medicine Abbreviated Journal Nat Med  
  Volume (down) 24 Issue 12 Pages 1795-1803  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract The circadian clock is a complex cellular mechanism that, through the control of diverse metabolic and gene expression pathways, governs a large array of cyclic physiological processes. Epidemiological and clinical data reveal a connection between the disruption of circadian rhythms and cancer that is supported by recent preclinical data. In addition, results from animal models and molecular studies underscore emerging links between cancer metabolism and the circadian clock. This has implications for therapeutic approaches, and we discuss the possible design of chronopharmacological strategies.  
  Address Department of Biological Chemistry, Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism, INSERM U1233, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA. psc@uci.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1078-8956 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30523327 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2135  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stone, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Value of Darkness: A Moral Framework for Urban Nighttime Lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Science and Engineering Ethics Abbreviated Journal Sci Eng Ethics  
  Volume (down) 24 Issue 2 Pages 607-628  
  Keywords Darkness; Society  
  Abstract The adverse effects of artificial nighttime lighting, known as light pollution, are emerging as an important environmental issue. To address these effects, current scientific research focuses mainly on identifying what is bad or undesirable about certain types and uses of lighting at night. This paper adopts a value-sensitive approach, focusing instead on what is good about darkness at night. In doing so, it offers a first comprehensive analysis of the environmental value of darkness at night from within applied ethics. A design for values orientation is utilized to conceptualize, define, and categorize the ways in which value is derived from darkness. Nine values are identified and categorized via their type of good, temporal outlook, and spatial characteristics. Furthermore, these nine values are translated into prima facie moral obligations that should be incorporated into future design choices, policy-making, and innovations to nighttime lighting. Thus, the value of darkness is analyzed with the practical goal of informing future decision-making about urban nighttime lighting.  
  Address Ethics and Philosophy of Technology Section, Delft University of Technology, Jaffalaan 5, 2628 BX, Delft, The Netherlands. t.w.stone@tudelft.nl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1353-3452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28597220; PMCID:PMC5876417 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2225  
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Author McKenna, H.; van der Horst, G.T.J.; Reiss, I.; Martin, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Clinical chronobiology: a timely consideration in critical care medicine Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Critical Care (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Crit Care  
  Volume (down) 22 Issue 1 Pages 124  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract A fundamental aspect of human physiology is its cyclical nature over a 24-h period, a feature conserved across most life on Earth. Organisms compartmentalise processes with respect to time in order to promote survival, in a manner that mirrors the rotation of the planet and accompanying diurnal cycles of light and darkness. The influence of circadian rhythms can no longer be overlooked in clinical settings; this review provides intensivists with an up-to-date understanding of the burgeoning field of chronobiology, and suggests ways to incorporate these concepts into daily practice to improve patient outcomes. We outline the function of molecular clocks in remote tissues, which adjust cellular and global physiological function according to the time of day, and the potential clinical advantages to keeping in time with them. We highlight the consequences of “chronopathology”, when this harmony is lost, and the risk factors for this condition in critically ill patients. We introduce the concept of “chronofitness” as a new target in the treatment of critical illness: preserving the internal synchronisation of clocks in different tissues, as well as external synchronisation with the environment. We describe methods for monitoring circadian rhythms in a clinical setting, and how this technology may be used for identifying optimal time windows for interventions, or to alert the physician to a critical deterioration of circadian rhythmicity. We suggest a chronobiological approach to critical illness, involving multicomponent strategies to promote chronofitness (chronobundles), and further investment in the development of personalised, time-based treatment for critically ill patients.  
  Address Critical Care Unit, Royal Free Hospital, Pond Street, London, NW3 2QG, UK. daniel.martin@ucl.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1364-8535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29747699 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1897  
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