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Author Mascovich, K. A., Larson, L. R., & Andrews, K. M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lights On, or Lights Off? Hotel Guests' Response to Nonpersonal Educational Outreach Designed to Protect Nesting Sea Turtles Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Chelonian Conservation and Biology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 17 Issue 2 Pages 206-215  
  Keywords Education; Psychology  
  Abstract Light pollution from beachfront hotels has the potential to impact nesting and hatching sea turtles. Education strategies could be used to alter visitor behavior and mitigate this threat. We tested the efficacy of a sea turtle–friendly education card that encouraged visitors to “protect the night, hide the light.” Cards were placed in beachfront hotel rooms at a prominent sea turtle nesting site: Jekyll Island, Georgia. We assessed visitor responses by conducting nightly observations to determine the proportion of occupied guest rooms with beach-visible lights under 2 different scenarios (cards present or cards absent). We found that less than half of all hotel guests closed room blinds to minimize artificial light on the nesting beach, and compliance rates seemed to be lower during peak visitation times. The nonpersonal educational treatment (card) had little effect on visitors' sea turtle–friendly lighting choices and behaviors, highlighting the need for other approaches to encourage responsible tourist behavior at ecologically sensitive beach destinations.  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2316  
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Author Al Zahrani, M.H.; Omar, A.I.; Abdoon, A.M.O.; Ibrahim, A.A.; Alhogail, A.; Elmubarak, M.; Elamin, Y.E.; AlHelal, M.A.; Alshahrani, A.M.; Abdelgader, T.M.; Saeed, I.; El Gamri, T.B.; Alattas, M.S.; Dahlan, A.A.; Assiri, A.M.; Maina, J.; Li, X.H.; Snow, R.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Cross-border movement, economic development and malaria elimination in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMC Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Med  
  Volume (down) 16 Issue 1 Pages 98  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health  
  Abstract Malaria at international borders presents particular challenges with regards to elimination. International borders share common malaria ecologies, yet neighboring countries are often at different stages of the control-to-elimination pathway. Herein, we present a case study on malaria, and its control, at the border between Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Malaria program activity reports, case data, and ancillary information have been assembled from national health information systems, archives, and other related sources. Information was analyzed as a semi-quantitative time series, between 2000 and 2017, to provide a plausibility framework to understand the possible contributions of factors related to control activities, conflict, economic development, migration, and climate. The malaria recession in the Yemeni border regions of Saudi Arabia is a likely consequence of multiple, coincidental factors, including scaled elimination activities, cross-border vector control, periods of low rainfall, and economic development. The temporal alignment of many of these factors suggests that economic development may have changed the receptivity to the extent that it mitigated against surges in vulnerability posed by imported malaria from its endemic neighbor Yemen. In many border areas of the world, malaria is likely to be sustained through a complex congruence of factors, including poverty, conflict, and migration.  
  Address Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. rsnow@kemri-wellcome.org  
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  ISSN 1741-7015 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:29940950 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1948  
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Author Hopkins, G.R.; Gaston, K.J.; Visser, M.E.; Elgar, M.A.; Jones, T.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night as a driver of evolution across urban-rural landscapes Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Abbreviated Journal Front Ecol Environ  
  Volume (down) 16 Issue 8 Pages 472-479  
  Keywords Ecology, Commentary  
  Abstract Light is fundamental to biological systems, affecting the daily rhythms of bacteria, plants, and animals. Artificial light at night (ALAN), a ubiquitous feature of urbanization, interferes with these rhythms and has the potential to exert strong selection pressures on organisms living in urban environments. ALAN also fragments landscapes, altering the movement of animals into and out of artificially lit habitats. Although research has documented phenotypic and genetic differentiation between urban and rural organisms, ALAN has rarely been considered as a driver of evolution. We argue that the fundamental importance of light to biological systems, and the capacity for ALAN to influence multiple processes contributing to evolution, makes this an important driver of evolutionary change, one with the potential to explain broad patterns of population differentiation across urban–rural landscapes. Integrating ALAN's evolutionary potential into urban ecology is a targeted and powerful approach to understanding the capacity for life to adapt to an increasingly urbanized world.  
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  ISSN 1540-9295 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2073  
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Author Li, H.; Jia, Y.; Zhou, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Urban Expansion Pattern Analysis and Planning Implementation Evaluation Based on using Fully Convolution Neural Network to Extract Land Range Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication NeuroQuantology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 16 Issue 5 Pages 814-822  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract In recent years, due to the rapid development of China’s urban, it is significant for effective implementation of urban science development and planning that grasp the process of urban development, analyze the potential of subsequent development, and evaluate the matching degree of the development status and the planning. Thereinto, an effective way we exercise today is to evaluate urban expansion pattern analysis and planning implementation. According to research results of the urban land range extraction method based on the support vector machine (SVM) and fully convolution neural network (FCN) of the depth learning method for the night light image data, this paper describes an integration of remote sensing (RS) and geographic information system (GIS) and analyzes the urban expansion pattern of Beijing based on the computed results of landscape pattern indices. The results unveil that from 1990s to 2010s, Beijing took on a circle expansion mode on the ground the spatial agglomeration degree gradually increases and the expansion potential has spatial distinctions, which basically meets the requirements of the overall planning.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2088  
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Author Yang, M.; Ma, N.; Zhu, Y.; Su, Y.-C.; Chen, Q.; Hsiao, F.-C.; Ji, Y.; Yang, C.-M.; Zhou, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Acute Effects of Intermittent Light Exposure in the Evening on Alertness and Subsequent Sleep Architecture Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health  
  Volume (down) 15 Issue 3 Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Exposure to bright light is typically intermittent in our daily life. However, the acute effects of intermittent light on alertness and sleep have seldom been explored. To investigate this issue, we employed within-subject design and compared the effects of three light conditions: intermittent bright light (30-min pulse of blue-enriched bright light (~1000 lux, ~6000 K) alternating with 30-min dim normal light (~5 lux, ~3600 K) three times); continuous bright light; and continuous dim light on subjective and objective alertness and subsequent sleep structure. Each light exposure was conducted during the three hours before bedtime. Fifteen healthy volunteers (20 +/- 3.4 years; seven males) were scheduled to stay in the sleep laboratory for four separated nights (one for adaptation and the others for the light exposures) with a period of at least one week between nights. The results showed that when compared with dim light, both intermittent light and continuous bright light significantly increased subjective alertness and decreased sleep efficiency (SE) and total sleep time (TST). Intermittent light significantly increased objective alertness than dim light did during the second half of the light-exposure period. Our results suggested that intermittent light was as effective as continuous bright light in their acute effects in enhancing subjective and objective alertness and in negatively impacting subsequent sleep.  
  Address Shenzhen Guohua Optoelectronics Tech. Co., Ltd., Shenzhen 518110, China. guofu.zhou@m.scnu.edu.cn  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1660-4601 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29543731 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1822  
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