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Author Bian, Z.; Yang, Q.; Li, T.; Cheng, R.; Barnett, Y.; Lu, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Study of the beneficial effects of green light on lettuce grown under short-term continuous red and blue light-emitting diodes Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Physiologia Plantarum Abbreviated Journal Physiol Plant  
  Volume (down) 164 Issue 2 Pages 226-240  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Red and blue light are the most important light spectra for driving photosynthesis to produce adequate crop yield. It is also believed that green light may contribute to adaptations to growth. However, the effects of green light, which can trigger specific and necessary responses of plant growth, have been underestimated in the past. In this study, lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) was exposed to different continuous light (CL) conditions for 48 h by a combination of red and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) supplemented with or without green LEDs, in an environmental-controlled growth chamber. Green light supplementation enhanced photosynthetic capacity by increasing net photosynthetic rates (Pn ), maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv /Fm ), electron transport for carbon fixation (JPSII ) and chlorophyll content in plants under the CL treatment. Green light decreased malondialdehyde and H2 O2 accumulation by increasing the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.1.1) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11) after 24 h of CL. Supplemental green light significantly increased the expression of photosynthetic genes LHCb and PsbA from 6 to 12 h, and these gene expression were maintained at higher levels than those under other light conditions between 12 and 24 h. However, a notable down-regulation of both LHCb and PsbA was observed during 24 to 48 h. These results indicate that the effects of green light on lettuce plant growth, via enhancing activity of particular components of antioxidantive enzyme system and promoting of LHCb and PsbA expression to maintain higher photosynthetic capacity, alleviated a number of the negative effects caused by CL.  
  Address School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Science, Brackenhurst Campus, Nottingham Trent University, NG25 0QF, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-9317 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29493775 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1905  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Syposz, M.; Gonçalves, F.; Carty, M.; Hoppitt, W.; Manco, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Factors influencing Manx Shearwater grounding on the west coast of Scotland Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Ibis Abbreviated Journal Ibis  
  Volume (down) 160 Issue 4 Pages 846-854  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Grounding of thousands of newly fledged petrels and shearwaters (family Procellariidae) in built‐up areas due to artificial light is a global problem. Due to their anatomy these grounded birds find it difficult to take off from built‐up areas and many fall victim to predation, cars, dehydration or starvation. This research investigated a combination of several factors that may influence the number of Manx Shearwater Puffinus puffinus groundings in a coastal village of Scotland located close to a nesting site for this species. A model was developed that used meteorological variables and moon cycle to predict the daily quantity of birds that were recovered on the ground. The model, explaining 46.32% of the variance of the data, revealed how new moon and strong onshore winds influence grounding. To a lesser extent, visibility conditions can also have an effect on grounding probabilities. The analysis presented in this study can improve rescue campaigns of not only Manx Shearwaters but also other species attracted to the light pollution by predicting conditions leading to an increase in the number of groundings. It could also inform local authorities when artificial light intensity needs to be reduced.  
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0019-1019 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2778  
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Author Stafstrom, J.A.; Hebets, E.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Male attraction to female airborne cues by the net-casting spider, Deinopis spinosa Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Behavioural Processes Abbreviated Journal Behav Processes  
  Volume (down) 159 Issue Pages 23-30  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract For many animals, finding a mate can be a difficult task. For males, it often involves actively searching for conspecific females, sometimes over great distances. This mate-searching can be aided through chemical or visual signals or cues produced by sexually receptive females. Here, we investigate the roles of olfaction and vision in mate-searching in a strictly nocturnal net-casting spider, Deinopis spinosa. First, we used an olfactometer assay to determine if mature male D. spinosa respond to conspecific airborne cues. We found that mature males, but not mature females, were attracted to airborne cues of mature female conspecifics. We next investigated the relative importance of olfaction and vision in male mate-searching. While manipulating airflow and light levels in screened enclosures in the laboratory, we tested freely moving mature males for mate-searching success. We found no effect of our airflow treatment on mate-searching success. Light levels, however, affected mate-searching in an unexpected way – males were more likely to locate females in complete darkness when compared to dim-light conditions. Our results suggest that visual cues are not necessary for successful male mate-searching in D. spinosa, but that the visual environment can nonetheless influence male behavior. In summary, we provide evidence suggesting that airborne cues, but not visual cues, are important in D. spinosa male mate-searching efforts, though the source of these chemical airborne cues remains unknown.  
  Address University of Nebraska – Lincoln, School of Biological Sciences, NE, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0376-6357 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30562562 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2152  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kong, Y.; Stasiak, M.; Dixon, M.A.; Zheng, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Blue light associated with low phytochrome activity can promote elongation growth as shade-avoidance response: A comparison with red light in four bedding plant species Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Environmental and Experimental Botany Abbreviated Journal Environmental and Experimental Botany  
  Volume (down) 155 Issue Pages 345-359  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract o explore the action mode of blue light on elongation growth of bedding plants, the plant growth and morphology traits of petunia (Petunia × hybrida, ‘Duvet Red’), calibrachoa (Calibrachoa × hybrida, ‘Kabloom Deep Blue’), geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum, ‘Pinto Premium Salmon’), and marigold (Tagetes erecta, ‘Antigua Orange’) were compared under four light quality treatments: (1) R, “pure” red light (660 nm); (2) B, “pure” blue light (450 nm); (3) BR, “unpure” blue light created by mixing B with a low level of R to provide B/R ≈ 9; (4) BRF, “unpure” blue light created by adding a low level of far red light to BR with red/far red ≈ 1. Continuous (24-h) light-emitting diode lighting with either 100 or 50 μmol m−2 s−1 photosynthetic photon flux density at ≈ 23℃ was used with the above treatments. After 14–20 day of lighting treatment, B promoted elongation growth compared to R, as demonstrated by a greater canopy height, main stem length, internode length, and daily main stem extension rate. However, BR showed similar or inhibitory effects on these traits relative to R, while BRF exhibited similar promotion effects as B. The calculated phytochrome photoequilibrium, an indication of phytochrome activity, was higher for R (0.89) and BR (0.74) than for B (0.49) and BRF (0.63). Adding red (or far red) light reversed the effects of B (or BR) on elongation growth and the phytochrome photoequilibrium, suggesting that blue light promotion of elongation growth is related to the lower phytochrome activity. Also, B and BRF, when compared to R or BR, promoted elongation growth to a greater degree at 50 than 100 μmol m−2 s−1 for petunia and calibrachoa. In addition to the promoted elongation growth, B and BRF reduced side branch number, biomass allocation to side branches, leaf epinasty, leaf angle, and/or leaf chlorophyll content relative to R or BR, but increased individual leaf area, petiole length, and/or biomass allocation to main stem, which varied with different species. It suggests that the promoted elongation growth by blue light associated with lower phytochrome activity is one of shade-avoidance responses with varying sensitivity among species.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0098-8472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1973  
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Author Dimitriadis, C.; Fournari - Konstantinidou, I.; Sourbès, L.; Koutsoubas, D.; Mazaris, A.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reduction of sea turtle population recruitment caused by nightlight: Evidence from the Mediterranean region Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Ocean & Coastal Management Abbreviated Journal Ocean & Coastal Management  
  Volume (down) 153 Issue Pages 108-115  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The spread of artificial night lighting is increasingly acknowledged as a major threat to global biodiversity. Identifying and exploring the impacts of nightlight pollution upon species behavior, ecology and population dynamics could enhance conservation capacity. Sea turtle hatchlings emerge from nest at night and use visual cues to direct towards the brightest and lowest horizon, eventually leading them to the sea. Nightlight pollution could alter the cues perceived, disorienting the fragile hatchlings. We examined the level of artificial lighting and orientation patterns of sea turtles hatchling, in Zakynthos Island, Greece, one of the main nesting rookeries of the loggerheads (Caretta caretta) in the Mediterranean Sea. We analyzed movement patterns of 5967 hatchlings from 230 nests, and demonstrate that nightlight pollution could reduce population recruitment by more than 7%, suggesting that mitigation measures should become a high conservation priority. Our results further suggest that the responses of sea turtle hatchlings to artificial nighttime lighting could vary significantly depending on various factors, either anthropogenic or natural. Local conditions operating at the nesting site level determine the fine scale responses of hatchlings, thus conservation measures should be drawn in respect to site-specific properties.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0964-5691 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1792  
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