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Author Fehrer, D.; Krarti, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spatial distribution of building energy use in the United States through satellite imagery of the earth at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Building and Environment Abbreviated Journal Building and Environment  
  Volume (down) 142 Issue Pages 252-264  
  Keywords remote sensing  
  Abstract Despite the importance of geospatial analysis of energy use in buildings, the data available for such exercises is limited. A potential solution is to use geospatial information, such as that obtained from satellites, to disaggregate building energy use data to a more useful scale. Many researchers have used satellite imagery to estimate the extent of human activities, including building energy use and population distribution. Much of the reported work has been carried out in rapidly developing countries such as India and China where urban development is dynamic and not always easy to measure. In countries with less rapid urbanization, such as the United States, there is still value in using satellite imagery to estimate building energy use for the purposes of identifying energy efficiency opportunities and planning electricity transmission. This study evaluates nighttime light imagery obtained from the VIIRS instrument aboard the SUOMI NPP satellite as a predictor of building energy use intensity within states, counties, and cities in the United States. It is found that nighttime lights can explain upwards of 90% of the variability in energy consumption in the United States, depending on conditions and geospatial scale. The results of this research are used to generate electricity and fuel consumption maps of the United States with a resolution of less than 200 square meters. The methodologies undertaken in this study can be replicated globally to create more opportunities for geospatial energy analysis without the hurdles often associated with disaggregated building energy use data collection.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0360-1323 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1938  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Boucher, R.; Knefati, S.; Ouimet, C.-A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Conservation du ciel nocturne : surveillance de l’éclairage extérieur et de la pollution lumineuse au parc national et à la Réserve internationale de ciel étoilé du Mont-Mégantic Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Le Naturaliste canadien Abbreviated Journal Le Naturaliste canadien  
  Volume (down) 142 Issue 3 Pages 88  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract English:

Although seemingly unchanging, today, our ability to see stars on a dark night is in danger of disappearing. The reason for this is the widespread growth of light pollution from inadequate lighting systems. This study, which used a range of methods, presents the results of light pollution measurements taken within the Mont-Mégantic International Dark Sky Reserve (MMIDSR), which was created in 2007 to protect the quality of astronomical observations and research at the Mont-Mégantic Observatory, and to preserve the exceptional starry nightscape visible from the site. Two essential elements of artificial night lighting were considered: its source and its diffusion in the atmosphere. Analyses showed that despite a global trend towards an increase in light levels, population growth on the outskirts of the Parc national du Mont-Mégantic, and the arrival of problematic types of lighting fixtures on the market, the level of light pollution in the MMIDSR has remained stable over the last 10 years, not only at the zenith but across the entire sky.

French:

Pourtant d’apparence immuable, le ciel étoilé est aujourd’hui menacé de disparition. La cause est la croissance généralisée de la pollution lumineuse, résultat de l’utilisation de dispositifs d’éclairage inadéquats. Nous présentons ici les résultats de la mesure de cette pollution obtenue par différentes approches méthodologiques sur le territoire de la Réserve internationale de ciel étoilé du Mont-Mégantic (RICEMM). La RICEMM a été créée en 2007 afin de protéger la qualité des observations astronomiques et de recherche de l’observatoire du mont Mégantic, ainsi que pour conserver les paysages étoilés exceptionnels du site. Deux aspects incontournables de la lumière artificielle nocturne ont été pris en compte : ses sources, ainsi que sa diffusion dans l’atmosphère. Les analyses démontrent que le niveau de pollution lumineuse est resté stable depuis 10 ans dans la RICEMM, tant au zénith que pour l’ensemble du ciel, et ce, malgré une tendance mondiale à la hausse des niveaux d’éclairement, l’augmentation de la population dans la périphérie du parc national du Mont-Mégantic et l’arrivée sur le marché de types de luminaires problématiques.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language French Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0798 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2004  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cai, W.; Yue, J.; Dai, Q.; Hao, L.; Lin, Y.; Shi, W.; Huang, Y.; Wei, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The impact of room surface reflectance on corneal illuminance and rule-of-thumb equations for circadian lighting design Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Building and Environment Abbreviated Journal Building and Environment  
  Volume (down) 141 Issue Pages 288-297  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract Recently, corneal illuminance attracts much attention because it is closely related to important functions of indoor lighting. Especially, applying circadian light in the built environment places a challenging requirement on indirect corneal illuminance. In this work, rule-of-thumb equations are proposed to guide circadian lighting design: (i) for artificial lighting, Ecor,avg (i) = (Φ/C1) · ρ/(1−ρ′), where Ecor,avg (i) is the average indirect corneal illuminance at standing or sitting positions, Φ is the initial flux from luminaires, C1 is a constant comparable to the total room surface area, ρ is the reflectance of the surface where the first reflection occurs, and ρ′ is the area-weighted average of surface reflectance; and (ii) for daylighting, Ecor,avg (i) = C2 · WWR · ρ/(1−ρ′), where C2 is a constant, and WWR represents the window-to-wall ratio.

The equations above are validated by comparing against numerical simulation data obtained with the Radiance software. For artificial lighting simulation, various combinations of room surface reflectance, initial light distribution, and WWR are investigated; and for daylighting simulation, different combinations of surface reflectance, WWR, and geographic location are analyzed. The good fits to simulation data indicate that the proposed simple equations can provide reasonably accurate results for quick feedback at the field. It is also demonstrated that room surface reflectance has a dominant impact on indirect corneal illuminance. The approach of improving surface reflectance is more favorable than increasing luminaire flux or expanding window area, and therefore should be the recommended approach to achieve quality and efficient circadian lighting.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0360-1323 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1929  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Robertson, B.A.; Keddy-Hector, I.A.; Shrestha, S.D.; Silverberg, L.Y.; Woolner, C.E.; Hetterich, I.; Horváth, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Susceptibility to ecological traps is similar among closely related taxa but sensitive to spatial isolation Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 135 Issue Pages 77-84  
  Keywords aquatic insect; behaviour; evolutionary trap; light pollution; maladaptation; polarized light pollution  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1793  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Emmer, K.M.; Russart, K.L.G.; Walker, W.H.; Nelson, R.J.; DeVries, A.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of light at night on laboratory animals and research outcomes Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Behavioral Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Behav Neurosci  
  Volume (down) 132 Issue 4 Pages 302-314  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Light has substantial influences on the physiology and behavior of most laboratory animals. As such, lighting conditions within animal rooms are potentially significant and often underappreciated variables within experiments. Disruption of the light/dark cycle, primarily by exposing animals to light at night (LAN), disturbs biological rhythms and has widespread physiological consequences because of mechanisms such as melatonin suppression, sympathetic stimulation, and altered circadian clock gene expression. Thus, attention to the lighting environment of laboratory animals and maintaining consistency of a light/dark cycle is imperative for study reproducibility. Light intensity, as well as wavelength, photoperiod, and timing, are all important variables. Although modern rodent facilities are designed to facilitate appropriate light cycling, there are simple ways to modify rooms to prevent extraneous light exposure during the dark period. Attention to lighting conditions of laboratory animals by both researchers and research care staff ensures best practices for maintaining animal welfare, as well as reproducibility of research results. (PsycINFO Database Record  
  Address Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0735-7044 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29952608 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1957  
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