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Author Benfield, J.A.; Nutt, R.J.; Taff, B.D.; Miller, Z.D.; Costigan, H.; Newman, P.
Title A laboratory study of the psychological impact of light pollution in National Parks Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Environmental Psychology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Environmental Psychology
Volume (up) 57 Issue Pages 67-72
Keywords Conservation; Skyglow; Psychology
Abstract Light pollution is ubiquitous in much of the developed and developing world, including rural and wilderness areas. Other sources of pollution, such as noise or motorized vehicle emissions, are known to impact the perceived quality of natural settings as well as the psychological well-being and satisfaction of visitors to those locations, but the effects of light pollution on visitors to natural settings is largely unstudied. Using experimental manipulations of light pollution levels in virtual reality simulations of three U.S. National Parks, the current study aimed to provide initial evidence of an effect on visitors. Results show that light pollution impacts a range of psychological and scene evaluation dimensions but that pristine night skies are not necessarily viewed as the ideal, likely due to being viewed as unfamiliar or unrealistic because so few have experienced the true baseline.
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ISSN 0272-4944 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1941
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Author Babadi, S.; Ramirez-Inguiez, R.; Boutaleb, T.; Mallick, T.
Title Producing uniform illumination within a rectangular area by using a nonimaging optic Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Applied Optics Abbreviated Journal Appl. Opt.
Volume (up) 57 Issue 31 Pages 9357
Keywords Lighting
Abstract This paper proposes a new design method to create a novel optical element to generate uniform illumination within a rectangular area. Based on this model, an illuminated area is irradiated by two sets of rays; the first one irradiates the target plane after refraction from the top section of the lens, and the second one irradiates from the reflection at the side profile of the lens and then from refraction at the top part of the lens. The results show that a uniformity of over 90% can be achieved.
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ISSN 1559-128X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2046
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Author Zhao, N., Zhang, W., Liu, Y., Samson, E. L., Chen, Y., & Cao, G.
Title Improving Nighttime Light Imagery With Location-Based Social Media Data Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) 57 Issue 4 Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Location-based social media have been extensively utilized in the concept of “social sensing” to exploit dynamic information about human activities, yet joint uses of social sensing and remote sensing images are underdeveloped at present. In this paper, the close relationship between the number of Twitter users and brightness of nighttime lights (NTL) over the contiguous United States is calculated and geotagged tweets are then used to upsample a stable light image for 2013. An associated outcome of the upsampling process is the solution of two major problems existing in the NTL image, pixel saturation, and blooming effects. Compared with the original stable light image, digital number (DN) values of the upsampled stable light image have larger correlation coefficients with gridded population (0.47 versus 0.09) and DN values of the new generation NTL image product (0.56 versus 0.52), i.e., the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite day/night band image composite. In addition, total personal incomes of states are disaggregated to each pixel in proportion to the DN value of the pixel in the NTL images and then aggregate by counties. Personal incomes distributed by the upsampled NTL image are closer to the official demographic data than those distributed by the original stable light image. All of these results explore the potential of geotagged tweets to improve the quality of NTL images for more accurately estimating or mapping socioeconomic factors.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2353
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Author Kernbach, M.E.; Hall, R.J.; Burkett-Cadena, N.; Unnasch, T.R.; Martin, L.B.
Title Dim light at night: physiological effects and ecological consequences for infectious disease Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Integrative and Comparative Biology Abbreviated Journal Integr Comp Biol
Volume (up) 58 Issue 5 Pages 995-1007
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light pollution has emerged as a pervasive component of land development over the past century. Several detrimental impacts of this anthropogenic influence have been identified in night shift workers, laboratory rodents, and a plethora of wildlife species. Circadian, or daily, patterns are interrupted by the presence of light at night and have the capacity to alter rhythmic physiological or behavioral characteristics. Indeed, biorhythm disruption can lead to metabolic, reproductive, and immunological dysfunction depending on the intensity, timing, duration and wavelength of light exposure. Light pollution, in many forms and by many pathways, is thus apt to affect the nature of host-pathogen interactions. However, no research has yet investigated this possibility. The goal of this manuscript is to outline how dim light at night (dLAN), a relevant and common form of light pollution, may affect disease dynamics by interrupting circadian rhythms and regulation of immune responses as well as opportunities for host-parasite interactions and subsequent transmission risk including spillover into humans. We close by proposing some promising interventions including alternative lighting methods or vector control efforts.
Address Department of Global Health, University of South Florida, Tampa FL
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1540-7063 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29939262 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1946
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Author Kim, Y.J.; Kim, H.M.; Kim, H.M.; Jeong, B.R.; Lee, H.-J.; Kim, H.-J.; Hwang, S.J.
Title Ice plant growth and phytochemical concentrations are affected by light quality and intensity of monochromatic light-emitting diodes Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Horticulture, Environment, and Biotechnology Abbreviated Journal Hortic. Environ. Biotechnol.
Volume (up) 59 Issue 4 Pages 529-536
Keywords Plants
Abstract The ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.), widely known to be an effective cure for diabetes mellitus, is also a functional crop. This study was conducted to examine the effects of light quality and intensity of monochromatic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on ice plant growth and phytochemical concentrations in a closed-type plant production system. Ice plant seedlings were transplanted into a deep floating technique system with a recycling nutrient solution (EC 4.0 dS m−1, pH 6.5). Fluorescent lamps, as well as monochromatic red (660 nm) and blue (450 nm) LEDs, were used at 120 ± 5 or 150 ± 5 µmol m−2 s−1 PPFD with a photoperiod of 14 h/10 h (light/dark) for 4 weeks. Ice plants showed higher growth under the high light intensity treatment, especially under the red LEDs. Furthermore, the SPAD value and photosynthetic rate were higher under the red LEDs with 150 µmol m−2 s−1 PPFD. The ice plant phytochemical composition, such as antioxidant activity and myo-inositol and pinitol concentrations, were highest under the blue LEDs with 150 µmol m−2 s−1 PPFD. Total phenolic concentration was highest under the blue LEDs with 120 µmol m−2 s−1 PPFD. Despite a slightly different dependence on light intensity, phytochemical concentrations responded positively to the blue LED treatments, as compared to other treatments. In conclusion, this study suggests that red LEDs enhance ice plant biomass, while blue LEDs induce phytochemical
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 2211-3452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1983
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