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Author Wuchterl, G.; Reithofer, M.
Title Licht über Wien VI Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) Issue Pages
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract Im Zentrum Wiens sättigt die Erhellung der Nacht, am Stadtrand sinken die jährlichen Zuwächse, wäh-rend im Abstand von 36 Kilometern (Großmugl) die Nächte um 10 % pro Jahr heller werden.Der Gesamtaufwand der Wiener Lichtglocke liegt 2018 bei 37 MW. Der Verlauf von 2011 bis 2018 zeigt ein deutliches Lichtmaximum um 2014 und 2015. Danach stellen wir einen allmählichen Rückgang fest.Der Verlauf der Lichtglocke und noch deutlicher jener der Einzelstationen zeigt signifikante Schwankun-gen von Jahr zu Jahr. Zur Aufklärung der Ursachen, die weder astronomisch noch meteorologisch sind, wur-den monatliche Analysen des Lichtmessnetzes mit Daten des Luftmessnetzes der Wiener MA 22 kombiniert. Die natürliche Variation über das Jahr wurde genutzt, um Zusammenhänge zwischen den Monatsmedianen von Luftfeuchtigkeit und Feinstaub mit jenen der Globalstrahlungsdaten zu suchen.Von 2016 bis 2018 korrelieren die Globalstrahlungswerte mit der relativen Luftfeuchtigkeit und den Feinstaubwerten (PM10 und PM2,5). Die engste Beziehung besteht auf der Kuffner-Sternwarte, wo eine Verdoppelung der Luftfeuchtigkeit statistisch von einer Verzehnfachung der Globalstrahlung begleitet wird. Die gefundenen Relationen sind über einen Faktor 100 in der Globalstrahlung äußerst robust und die Koeffizienten der Relationen sind an allen Stationen sehr homogen.Damit stehen gut bestimmte Zusammenhänge zwischen der Luftgüte und dem Zustand der klaren Atmo-sphäre zur Verfügung. Das wird es erlauben, Lichtmessnetze auf Standardatmosphären zu beziehen und damit eine wesentlich bessere Vergleichbarkeit der Daten zu unterschiedlichen Zeitpunkten herzustellen.- 130 Gigawattstunden Jahresaufwand für die Wiener Lichtglocke- 8 Jahre Vermessung der Lichtglocke zeigen Ansätze eines Rückgangs der Lichtflut- Mehr Feinstaub bewirkt überproportional mehr Lichtverschmutzung
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language German Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2718
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Author Ehrlich, D.; Schiavina, M.; Pesaresi, M.; Kemper, T.
Title Detecting spatial pattern of inequalities from remote sensing – Towards mapping of deprived communities and poverty Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication EUR 29465 EN Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) Issue Pages JRC113941
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Spatial inequalities across the globe are not easy to detect and satellite data have shown to be of use in this task. Earth Observation (EO) data combined with other information sources can provide complementary information to those derived from traditional methods. This research shows patterns of inequalities emerging by combining global night lights measured from Earth Observation, population density and built-up in 2015. The focus of the paper is to describe the spatial patterns that emerge by combing the three variables. This work focuses on processing EO data to derive information products, and in combining built-up- and population density with night-time lights emission. The built-up surface was derived entirely from remote sensing archives using artificial intelligence and pattern recognition techniques. The built-up was combined with population census data to derive population density. Also the night-time lights emission data were available from EO satellite sensors. The three layers are subsequently combined as three colour compositions based on the three primary colours (i.e. red, green and blue) to display the “spatial human settlement pattern” maps. These GHSL nightlights provide insights in inequalities across the globe. Many patterns seem to be associated with countries income. Typically, high income countries are very well lit at night, low income countries are poorly lit at night. All larger cities of the world are lit at night, those in low-income countries are often less well lit than cites in high-income countries. There are also important differences in nightlights emission in conflict areas, or along borders of countries. This report provides a selected number of patterns that are described at the regional, national and local scale. However, in depth analysis would be required to assess more precisely that relation between wealth access to energy and countries GDP, for example. This work also addresses regional inequality in GHSL nightlights in Slovakia. The country was selected to address the deprivation of the Roma minority community. The work aims to relate the information from the GHSL nightlights with that collected from field survey and census information conducted at the national level. Socio-economic data available at subnational level was correlated with nightlight. The analysis shows that despite the potential of GHSL nightlights in identifying deprived areas, the measurement scale of satellite derived nightlights at 375 x 375 m to 750 x 750 m pixel size is too coarse to capture the inequalities of deprived communities that occur at finer scale. In addition, in the European context, the gradient of inequality is not strong enough to produce strong evidence. Although there is a specific pattern of GHSL nightlights in settlements with high Roma presence, this cannot be used to identify such areas among the others. This work is part of the exploratory data analysis conducted within the GHSL team. The exploratory analysis will be followed by more quantitative assessments that will be available in future work.
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Publisher European Union Place of Publication Luxembourg Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-92-79-97528-8 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2821
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Author Behera, S.K.; Mohanta, R.
Title Total An Investigation into Light Pollution as a Limiting factor for shift of Mass nesting ground at Rushikulya rookery Ganjam Odishas Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Marine Research and Reviews Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) 1 Issue 6 Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Illumination due to artificial lights on nesting beaches and from nearby place to nesting beaches is detrimental to sea turtles because it alters critical nocturnal behaviors specifically, their choice of nesting sites and their return path to the sea after nesting. Illuminations perplex the hatchlings to find sea after emerging. Numerous studies conducted in other countries have demonstrated that artificial lights negatively impact on turtles, both female adults as they come to and go from their home beach to lay eggs, and to turtle hatchlings as they seek out the way to the open ocean. In this study we correlated the mass nesting intensity of 5years (2012 to 2018) at Rushikulya mass nesting site to the illumination zone. Illumination due to light conditions on nesting beaches are complex, and measuring light pollution in a way that effectively captures the impacts to sea turtles is difficult. But increase in intensity of illumination on selective mass nesting beaches showed gradual reduction in intensity of preferred nesting site during the mass nesting event. A gradual shift of nesting preference was also observed more toward darker zone.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2104
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Author Lowden, A.; Lemos, N.; Gonçalves, B.; Öztürk, G.; Louzada, F.; Pedrazzoli, M.; Moreno, C.
Title Delayed Sleep in Winter Related to Natural Daylight Exposure among Arctic Day Workers Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep
Volume (up) 1 Issue 1 Pages 105-116
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Natural daylight exposures in arctic regions vary substantially across seasons. Negative consequences have been observed in self-reports of sleep and daytime functions during the winter but have rarely been studied in detail. The focus of the present study set out to investigate sleep seasonality among indoor workers using objective and subjective measures. Sleep seasonality among daytime office workers (n = 32) in Kiruna (Sweden, 67.86° N, 20.23° E) was studied by comparing the same group of workers in a winter and summer week, including work and days off at the weekend, using actigraphs (motion loggers) and subjective ratings of alertness and mood. Actigraph analyses showed delayed sleep onset of 39 min in winter compared to the corresponding summer week (p < 0.0001) and shorter weekly sleep duration by 12 min (p = 0.0154). A delay of mid-sleep was present in winter at workdays (25 min, p < 0.0001) and more strongly delayed during days off (46 min, p < 0.0001). Sleepiness levels were higher in winter compared to summer (p < 0.05). Increased morning light exposure was associated with earlier mid-sleep (p < 0.001), while increased evening light exposure was associated with delay (p < 0.01). This study confirms earlier work that suggests that lack of natural daylight delays the sleep/wake cycle in a group of indoor workers, despite having access to electric lighting. Photic stimuli resulted in a general advanced sleep/wake rhythm during summer and increased alertness levels.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2137
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Author Nguyen, Cuong; Noy, Ilan
Title Measuring the Impact of Insurance on Urban Recovery with L ight : The 2011 New Zealand Earthquake Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication WORKING PAPERS IN ECONOMICS AND FINANCE Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) 2/2018 Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract We measure the longer-term effect of a major earthquake on the local economy, using night-time light intensity measured from space, and investigate whether insurance claim payments for damaged residential property affected the local recovery process. We focus on the destructive Christchurch earthquake of 2011 as our case study. In this event more than 95% of residential housing units were covered by insurance, but insurance payments were staggered over 5 years, enabling us to identify their local impact. We find that night-time luminosity can capture the process of recovery and describe the recovery’s determinants. We also find that insurance payments contributed significantly to the process of economic recovery after the earthquake, but delayed payments were less affective and cash settlement of claims were more affective in contributing to local recovery than insurance-managed rebuilding.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1836
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