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Author (up) Agbaria, S.; Haim, A.; Fares, F.; Zubidat, A.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Epigenetic modification in 4T1 mouse breast cancer model by artificial light at night and melatonin – the role of DNA-methyltransferase Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-15  
  Keywords Human Health; Cosinor analysis; DNA methyltransferases; global DNA methylation; melatonin; splenomegaly; tissue-specific  
  Abstract Currently, one of the most disputed hypotheses regarding breast cancer (BC) development is exposure to short wavelength artificial light at night (ALAN) as multiple studies suggest a possible link between them. This link is suggested to be mediated by nocturnal melatonin suppression that plays an integral role in circadian regulations including cell division. The objective of the research was to evaluate effects of 1 x 30 min/midnight ALAN (134 micro Wcm(-2), 460 nm) with or without nocturnal melatonin supplement on tumor development and epigenetic responses in 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice. Mice were monitored for body mass (Wb) and tumor volume for 3 weeks and thereafter urine samples were collected at regular intervals for determining daily rhythms of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (6-SMT). Finally, mice were sacrificed and the tumor, lungs, liver, and spleen were excised for analyzing the total activity of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) and global DNA methylation (GDM) levels. Mice exposed to ALAN significantly reduced 6-SMT levels and increased Wb, tumor volume, and lung metastasis compared with controls. These effects were diminished by melatonin. The DNMT activity and GDM levels showed tissue-specific response. The enzymatic activity and GDM levels were lower in tumor and liver and higher in spleen and lungs under ALAN compared with controls. Our results suggest that ALAN disrupts the melatonin rhythm and potentially leading to increased BC burden by affecting DNMT activity and GDM levels. These data may also be applicable to early detection and management of BC by monitoring melatonin and GDM levels as early biomarker of ALAN circadian disruption.  
  Address b The Israeli Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Chronobiology , University of Haifa , Haifa , Israel; Zubidat3(at)013.net.il  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30746962 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2211  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Agbaria, S.; Haim, A.; Fares, F.; Zubidat, A.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Epigenetic modification in 4T1 mouse breast cancer model by artificial light at night and melatonin – the role of DNA-methyltransferase Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Currently, one of the most disputed hypotheses regarding breast cancer (BC) development is exposure to short wavelength artificial light at night (ALAN) as multiple studies suggest a possible link between them. This link is suggested to be mediated by nocturnal melatonin suppression that plays an integral role in circadian regulations including cell division. The objective of the research was to evaluate effects of 1 x 30 min/midnight ALAN (134 micro Wcm(-2), 460 nm) with or without nocturnal melatonin supplement on tumor development and epigenetic responses in 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice. Mice were monitored for body mass (Wb) and tumor volume for 3 weeks and thereafter urine samples were collected at regular intervals for determining daily rhythms of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (6-SMT). Finally, mice were sacrificed and the tumor, lungs, liver, and spleen were excised for analyzing the total activity of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) and global DNA methylation (GDM) levels. Mice exposed to ALAN significantly reduced 6-SMT levels and increased Wb, tumor volume, and lung metastasis compared with controls. These effects were diminished by melatonin. The DNMT activity and GDM levels showed tissue-specific response. The enzymatic activity and GDM levels were lower in tumor and liver and higher in spleen and lungs under ALAN compared with controls. Our results suggest that ALAN disrupts the melatonin rhythm and potentially leading to increased BC burden by affecting DNMT activity and GDM levels. These data may also be applicable to early detection and management of BC by monitoring melatonin and GDM levels as early biomarker of ALAN circadian disruption.  
  Address b The Israeli Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Chronobiology , University of Haifa , Haifa , Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30746962 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2212  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Berman, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Opinion: Whither V(λ)? Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology  
  Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages 4-4  
  Keywords Vision  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2219  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Boyce, P.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The benefits of light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Building and Environment Abbreviated Journal Building and Environment  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting; Society; Conservation  
  Abstract The use of light at night continues to increase. Simply put, this is because without light we are deprived of our premier sense, vision. By enabling vision the use of light at night delivers a number of benefits to people. Such benefits include greater safety for pedestrians and drivers, reduced fear of crime, more use of outdoor facilities after dark, enhanced economic growth and the creation of built and natural environments that are a source of beauty and entertainment. This suggests that the use of light at night is linked to some very basic human motivations which in turn means that people value such benefits and will not willingly abandon them. Fortunately, careful lighting design, soundly-based outdoor lighting standards and new lighting and sensor technology offer the possibility of providing the benefits of light at night while minimizing the impact on the environment.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0360-1323 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2171  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Caorsi, V.; Sprau, P.; Zollinger, S.A.; Brumm, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nocturnal resting behaviour in urban great tits and its relation to anthropogenic disturbance and microclimate Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol  
  Volume 73 Issue 2 Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The ecological novelty of urbanisation poses many challenges to animals. We investigated whether anthropogenic disturbance (artificial light at night and noise) and abiotic factors in cities (temperature and humidity) predict nocturnal activity and rest in free-living urban great tits (Parus major). Our study is the first to relate nocturnal rest in wild birds to levels of noise pollution during the night, an issue that has been shown to be particularly damaging to human health. Unlike previous work on nocturnal behaviour of urban birds, we considered the combined effect of anthropogenic disturbance and urban microclimate to acknowledge that the umwelt of an animal is composed of multiple environmental variables. Using infrared cameras, we observed the nocturnal resting behaviour as a proxy for sleep in 17 birds in nest boxes deployed across the city of Munich, Germany. Although we found marked differences in resting behaviour between individuals, this variation was not related to the measured environmental factors. This finding contrasts earlier studies that reported nocturnal resting behaviour of birds to vary with temperature and light exposure. Although we did not find evidence that urban environmental factors disrupt resting behaviour in great tits, their sleep might still be impaired by the anthropogenic disturbances. To elucidate this issue, further studies are necessary that, for instance, measure brain activity.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2185  
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